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Title 49 Part 219 → Subpart A → §219.12

Title 49 → Subtitle B → Chapter II → Part 219 → Subpart A → §219.12

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 49 Part 219 → Subpart A → §219.12

e-CFR data is current as of December 3, 2019

Title 49Subtitle BChapter IIPart 219Subpart A → §219.12


Title 49: Transportation
PART 219—CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE
Subpart A—General


§219.12   Hours-of-service laws implications.

(a) A railroad is not excused from performing alcohol or drug testing under subpart C (post-accident toxicological testing) and subpart D (reasonable suspicion testing) of this part because the performance of such testing would violate the hours-of-service laws at 49 U.S.C. ch. 211. If a railroad establishes that a violation of the hours-of-service laws is caused solely because it was required to conduct post-accident toxicological testing or reasonable suspicion testing, FRA will not take enforcement action for the violation if the railroad used reasonable due diligence in completing the collection and otherwise completed it within the time limitations of §219.203(d) (for post-accident toxicological testing) or §219.305 (for reasonable suspicion testing), although the railroad must still report any excess service to FRA.

(b) A railroad may perform alcohol or drug testing authorized under subpart E (reasonable cause testing) of this part even if the performance of such testing would violate the hours-of-service laws at 49 U.S.C. ch. 211. If a railroad establishes that a violation of the hours-of-service laws is caused solely by its decision to conduct authorized reasonable cause testing, FRA will not take enforcement action for the violation if the railroad used reasonable due diligence in completing the collection and otherwise completed it within the time limitations of §219.407, although the railroad must still report any excess service to FRA.

(c) A railroad must schedule random alcohol and drug tests under subpart G of this part so that sufficient time is provided to complete the test within a covered employee's hours-of-service limitations under 49 U.S.C. ch. 211. However, if a direct observation collection is required during a random test per the requirements of part 40 of this title, then the random test must be completed regardless of the hours-of-service law limitations, although the railroad must still report any excess service to FRA. A railroad may not place a regulated employee on-duty for the sole purpose of conducting a random alcohol or drug test under subpart G of this part.

(d) A railroad must schedule follow-up tests under §219.104 so that sufficient time is provided to complete a test within a covered employee's hours-of-service limitations under 49 U.S.C. ch. 211. If a railroad is having a difficult time scheduling the required number of follow-up tests because a covered employee's work schedule is unpredictable, there is no prohibition against the railroad placing an employee (who is subject to being called to perform regulated service) on duty for the purpose of conducting the follow-up tests; except that an employee may be placed on duty for a follow-up alcohol test only if he or she is required to completely abstain from alcohol by a return-to-duty agreement, as provided by §40.303(b) of this title. A railroad must maintain documentation establishing the need to place the employee on duty for the purpose of conducting the follow-up test and provide this documentation for review upon request of an FRA representative.

[81 FR 37927, June 10, 2016]


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