Title 40

SECTION 1048.510

1048.510 What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing

§ 1048.510 What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

(a) Starting with the 2007 model year, measure emissions by testing the engine on a dynamometer with the duty cycle described in Appendix II to determine whether it meets the transient emission standards in § 1048.101(a).

(b) Calculate cycle statistics and compare with the established criteria as specified in 40 CFR 1065.514 to confirm that the test is valid.

(c) Warm up the test engine as follows before running a transient test:

(1) Operate the engine for the first 180 seconds of the appropriate duty cycle, then allow it to idle without load for 30 seconds. At the end of the 30-second idling period, start measuring emissions as the engine operates over the prescribed duty cycle. For severe-duty engines, this engine warm-up procedure may include up to 15 minutes of operation over the appropriate duty cycle.

(2) If the engine was already operating before a test, use good engineering judgment to let the engine cool down enough so measured emissions during the next test will accurately represent those from an engine starting at room temperature. For example, if an engine starting at room temperature warms up enough in three minutes to start closed-loop operation and achieve full catalyst activity, then minimal engine cooling is necessary before starting the next test.

(3) You are not required to measure emissions while the engine is warming up. However, you must design your emission-control system to start working as soon as possible after engine starting. In your application for certification, describe how your engine meets this objective (see § 1048.205(b)).

[67 FR 68347, Nov. 8, 2002, as amended at 70 FR 40478, July 13, 2005; 73 FR 59241, Oct. 8, 2008; 75 FR 23023, Apr. 30, 2010]

1048.510 What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing

§ 1048.510 What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

(a) Starting with the 2007 model year, measure emissions by testing the engine on a dynamometer with the duty cycle described in Appendix II to determine whether it meets the transient emission standards in § 1048.101(a).

(b) Calculate cycle statistics and compare with the established criteria as specified in 40 CFR 1065.514 to confirm that the test is valid.

(c) Warm up the test engine as follows before running a transient test:

(1) Operate the engine for the first 180 seconds of the appropriate duty cycle, then allow it to idle without load for 30 seconds. At the end of the 30-second idling period, start measuring emissions as the engine operates over the prescribed duty cycle. For severe-duty engines, this engine warm-up procedure may include up to 15 minutes of operation over the appropriate duty cycle.

(2) If the engine was already operating before a test, use good engineering judgment to let the engine cool down enough so measured emissions during the next test will accurately represent those from an engine starting at room temperature. For example, if an engine starting at room temperature warms up enough in three minutes to start closed-loop operation and achieve full catalyst activity, then minimal engine cooling is necessary before starting the next test.

(3) You are not required to measure emissions while the engine is warming up. However, you must design your emission-control system to start working as soon as possible after engine starting. In your application for certification, describe how your engine meets this objective (see § 1048.205(b)).

[67 FR 68347, Nov. 8, 2002, as amended at 70 FR 40478, July 13, 2005; 73 FR 59241, Oct. 8, 2008; 75 FR 23023, Apr. 30, 2010]