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Title 12 Part 1081 → Subpart A

Title 12 → Chapter X → Part 1081 → Subpart A

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 12 Part 1081 → Subpart A

e-CFR data is current as of March 27, 2020

Title 12Chapter XPart 1081 → Subpart A


Title 12: Banks and Banking
PART 1081—RULES OF PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATION PROCEEDINGS


§1081.100   Scope of the rules of practice.

Subparts A, B, C, and D of this part prescribe rules of practice and procedure applicable to adjudication proceedings authorized by section 1053 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 (Dodd-Frank Act) to ensure or enforce compliance with the provisions of Title X of the Dodd-Frank Act, rules prescribed by the Bureau under Title X of the Dodd-Frank Act, and any other Federal law or regulation that the Bureau is authorized to enforce. Except as otherwise provided in this part, the rules of practice contained in subparts A, B, C, and D of this part do not govern the conduct of Bureau investigations, investigational hearings or other proceedings that do not arise from proceedings after a notice of charges or a stipulation and consent order.

[78 FR 59164, Sept. 26, 2013]

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§1081.101   Expedition and fairness of proceedings.

To the extent practicable, consistent with requirements of law, the Bureau's policy is to conduct such adjudication proceedings fairly and expeditiously. In the conduct of such proceedings, the hearing officer and counsel for all parties shall make every effort at each stage of a proceeding to avoid delay. With the consent of the parties, the Director, at any time, or the hearing officer at any time prior to the filing of his or her recommended decision, may shorten any time limit prescribed by this part.

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§1081.102   Rules of construction.

For the purposes of this part:

(a) Any term in the singular includes the plural, and the plural includes the singular, if such use would be appropriate;

(b) Any use of a masculine, feminine, or neutral gender encompasses all three, if such use would be appropriate;

(c) Unless context requires otherwise, a party's counsel of record, if any, may, on behalf of that party, take any action required to be taken by the party; and

(d) To the extent this part uses terms defined by section 1002 of the Dodd-Frank Act, such terms shall have the same meaning as set forth therein, unless defined differently by §1081.103.

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§1081.103   Definitions.

For the purposes of this part, unless explicitly stated to the contrary:

Dodd-Frank Act means the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, Public Law 111-203 (July 21, 2010).

Adjudication proceeding means a proceeding conducted pursuant to section 1053 of the Dodd-Frank Act and intended to lead to the formulation of a final order other than a temporary order to cease and desist issued pursuant to section 1053(c) of the Dodd-Frank Act.

Bureau means the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection.

Chief hearing officer means the hearing officer charged with assigning hearing officers to specific proceedings, in the event there is more than one hearing officer available to the Bureau.

Counsel means any person representing a party pursuant to §1081.107.

Decisional employee means any employee of the Bureau who has not engaged in an investigative or prosecutorial role in a proceeding and who may assist the Director or the hearing officer, respectively, in preparing orders, recommended decisions, decisions, and other documents under this part.

Director means the Director of the Bureau or a person authorized to perform the functions of the Director in accordance with the law.

Enforcement counsel means any individual who files a notice of appearance as counsel on behalf of the Bureau in an adjudication proceeding.

Final order means an order issued by the Bureau with or without the consent of the respondent, which has become final, without regard to the pendency of any petition for reconsideration or review.

General Counsel means the General Counsel of the Bureau or any Bureau employee to whom the General Counsel has delegated authority to act under this part.

Hearing officer means an administrative law judge or any other person duly authorized to preside at a hearing.

Notice of charges means the pleading that commences an adjudication proceeding, as described in §1081.200, except that it does not include a stipulation and consent order under §1081.200(d).

Office of Administrative Adjudication means the office of the Bureau responsible for conducting adjudication proceedings.

Office of Enforcement means the office of the Bureau responsible for enforcement of Federal consumer financial law.

Party means the Bureau, any person named as a party in any notice of charges issued pursuant to this part, and, to the extent applicable, any person who intervenes in the proceeding pursuant to §1081.119(a) to seek a protective order.

Person means an individual, partnership, company, corporation, association (incorporated or unincorporated), trust, estate, cooperative organization, or other entity.

Person employed by the Bureau means Bureau employees, contractors, agents, and others acting for or on behalf of the Bureau, or at its direction, including consulting experts.

Respondent means the party named in the notice of charges.

State means any State, territory, or possession of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, or the United States Virgin Islands or any federally recognized Indian tribe, as defined by the Secretary of the Interior under section 104(a) of the Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act of 1994, 25 U.S.C. 479a-1(a).

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§1081.104   Authority of the hearing officer.

(a) General Rule. The hearing officer shall have all powers necessary to conduct a proceeding in a fair and impartial manner and to avoid unnecessary delay. No provision of this part shall be construed to limit the powers of the hearing officers provided by the Administrative Procedure Act, 5 U.S.C. 556, 557.

(b) Powers. The powers of the hearing officer include but are not limited to the power:

(1) To administer oaths and affirmations;

(2) To issue subpoenas, subpoenas duces tecum, and protective orders, as authorized by this part, and to quash or modify any such subpoenas or orders;

(3) To take depositions or cause depositions to be taken;

(4) To receive relevant evidence and to rule upon the admission of evidence and offers of proof;

(5) To regulate the course of a proceeding and the conduct of parties and their counsel;

(6) To reject written submissions that materially fail to comply with the requirements of this part, and to deny confidential status to documents and testimony without prejudice until a party complies with all relevant rules;

(7) To hold conferences for settlement, simplification of the issues, or any other proper purpose and require the attendance at any such conference of at least one representative of each party who has authority to negotiate concerning the resolution of issues in controversy;

(8) To inform the parties as to the availability of one or more alternative means of dispute resolution, and to encourage the use of such methods;

(9) To certify questions to the Director for his or her determination in accordance with the rules of this part;

(10) To consider and rule upon, as justice may require, all procedural and other motions appropriate in adjudication proceedings;

(11) To issue and file recommended decisions;

(12) To recuse himself or herself by motion made by a party or on his or her own motion;

(13) To issue such sanctions against parties or their counsel as may be necessary to deter repetition of sanctionable conduct or comparable conduct by others similarly situated, as provided for in this part or as otherwise necessary to the appropriate conduct of hearings and related proceedings, provided that no sanction shall be imposed before providing the sanctioned person an opportunity to show cause why no such sanction should issue; and

(14) To do all other things necessary and appropriate to discharge the duties of a presiding officer.

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§1081.105   Assignment, substitution, performance, disqualification of hearing officer.

(a) How assigned. In the event that more than one hearing officer is available to the Bureau for the conduct of proceedings under this part, the presiding hearing officer shall be designated by the chief hearing officer, who shall notify the parties of the hearing officer designated.

(b) Interference. Hearing officers shall not be subject to the supervision or direction of, or responsible to, any officer, employee, or agent engaged in the performance of investigative or prosecuting functions for the Bureau, and all direction by the Bureau to the hearing officer concerning any adjudication proceedings shall appear in and be made part of the record.

(c) Disqualification of hearing officers. (1) When a hearing officer deems himself or herself disqualified to preside in a particular proceeding, he or she shall issue a notice stating that he or she is withdrawing from the matter and setting forth the reasons therefore.

(2) Any party who has a reasonable, good faith basis to believe that a hearing officer has a personal bias, or is otherwise disqualified from hearing a case, may make a motion to the hearing officer that the hearing officer withdraw. The motion shall be accompanied by an affidavit setting forth the facts alleged to constitute grounds for disqualification. Such motion shall be filed at the earliest practicable time after the party learns, or could reasonably have learned, of the alleged grounds for disqualification. If the hearing officer does not disqualify himself or herself within ten days, he or she shall certify the motion to the Director pursuant to §1081.211, together with any statement he or she may wish to have considered by the Director. The Director shall promptly determine the validity of the grounds alleged, either directly or on the report of another hearing officer appointed to conduct a hearing for that purpose, and shall either direct the reassignment of the matter or confirm the hearing officer's continued role in the matter.

(d) Unavailability of hearing officer. In the event that the hearing officer withdraws or is otherwise unable to perform the duties of the hearing officer, the chief hearing officer or the Director shall designate another hearing officer to serve.

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§1081.106   Deadlines.

The deadlines for action by the hearing officer established by §§1081.203, 1081.205, 1081.211, 1081.212, and 1081.400, or elsewhere in this part, confer no substantive rights on respondents.

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§1081.107   Appearance and practice in adjudication proceedings.

(a) Appearance before the Bureau or a hearing officer—(1) By attorneys. Any member in good standing of the bar of the highest court of any State may represent others before the Bureau if such attorney is not currently suspended or debarred from practice before the Bureau or by a court of the United States or of any State.

(2) By non-attorneys. So long as such individual is not currently suspended or debarred from practice before the Bureau:

(i) An individual may appear on his or her own behalf;

(ii) A member of a partnership may represent the partnership;

(iii) A duly authorized officer of a corporation, trust or association may represent the corporation, trust or association; and

(iv) A duly authorized officer or employee of any government unit, agency, or authority may represent that unit, agency, or authority.

(3) Notice of appearance. Any individual acting as counsel on behalf of a party, including the Bureau, shall file a notice of appearance at or before the time that the individual submits papers or otherwise appears on behalf of a party in the adjudication proceeding. The notice of appearance must include a written declaration that the individual is currently qualified as provided in paragraph (a)(1) or (a)(2) of this section and is authorized to represent the particular party, and if applicable, must include the attorney's jurisdiction of admission or qualification, attorney identification number, and a statement by the appearing attorney attesting to his or her good standing within the legal profession. By filing a notice of appearance on behalf of a party in an adjudication proceeding, the counsel agrees and represents that he or she is authorized to accept service on behalf of the represented party and that, in the event of withdrawal from representation, he or she will, if required by the hearing officer, continue to accept service until a new counsel has filed a notice of appearance or until the represented party indicates that he or she will proceed on a pro se basis. The notice of appearance shall provide the representative's email address, telephone number and business address and, if different from the representative's addresses, electronic or other address at which the represented party may be served.

(b) Sanctions. Dilatory, obstructionist, egregious, contemptuous or contumacious conduct at any phase of any adjudication proceeding may be grounds for exclusion or suspension of counsel from the proceeding. An order imposing a sanction must describe the sanctioned conduct and explain the basis for the sanction.

(c) Standards of conduct; disbarment. (1) All attorneys practicing before the Bureau shall conform to the standards of ethical conduct required by the bars of which the attorneys are members.

(2) If for good cause shown, the Director believes that any attorney is not conforming to such standards, or that an attorney or counsel to a party has otherwise engaged in conduct warranting disciplinary action, the Director may issue an order requiring such person to show cause why he should not be suspended or disbarred from practice before the Bureau. The alleged offender shall be granted due opportunity to be heard in his or her own defense and may be represented by counsel. Thereafter, if warranted by the facts, the Director may issue against the attorney or counsel an order of reprimand, suspension, or disbarment.

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§1081.108   Good faith certification.

(a) General requirement. Every filing or submission of record following the issuance of a notice of charges shall be signed by at least one counsel of record in his or her individual name and shall state counsel's address, email address, and telephone number. A party who acts as his or her own counsel shall sign his or her individual name and state his or her address, email address, and telephone number on every filing or submission of record. Papers filed by electronic transmission may be signed with an “/s/” notation, which shall be deemed the signature of the party or representative whose name appears below the signature line.

(b) Effect of signature. (1) The signature of counsel or a party shall constitute a certification that: the counsel or party has read the filing or submission of record; to the best of his or her knowledge, information, and belief formed after reasonable inquiry, the filing or submission of record is well-grounded in fact and is warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law; and the filing or submission of record is not made for any improper purpose, such as to harass or to cause unnecessary delay or needless increase in the cost of litigation.

(2) If a filing or submission of record is not signed, the hearing officer shall strike the filing or submission of record, unless it is signed promptly after the omission is called to the attention of the filer.

(c) Effect of making oral motion or argument. The act of making any oral motion or oral argument by any counsel or party constitutes a certification that to the best of his or her knowledge, information, and belief formed after reasonable inquiry, his or her statements are well-grounded in fact and are warranted by existing law or a good faith argument for the extension, modification, or reversal of existing law, and are not made for any improper purpose, such as to harass or to cause unnecessary delay or needless increase in the cost of litigation.

(d) Sanctions. Counsel or a party that fails to abide by the requirements of this section may be subject to sanctions pursuant to §1081.104(b)(13).

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§1081.109   Conflict of interest.

(a) Conflict of interest in representation. No person shall appear as counsel for another person in an adjudication proceeding if it reasonably appears that such representation may be materially limited by that counsel's responsibilities to a third person or by the counsel's own interests. The hearing officer may take corrective measures at any stage of a proceeding to cure a conflict of interest in representation, including the issuance of an order limiting the scope of representation or disqualifying an individual from appearing in a representative capacity for the duration of the proceeding.

(b) Certification and waiver. If any person appearing as counsel represents two or more parties to an adjudication proceeding or also represents a non-party on a matter relevant to an issue in the proceeding, counsel must certify in writing at the time of filing the notice of appearance required by §1081.107(a)(3):

(1) That the counsel has personally and fully discussed the possibility of conflicts of interest with each such party and non-party; and

(2) That each such party and/or non-party waives any right it might otherwise have had to assert any known conflicts of interest or to assert any conflicts of interest during the course of the proceeding.

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§1081.110   Ex parte communication.

(a) Definitions. (1) For purposes of this section, ex parte communication means any material oral or written communication relevant to the merits of an adjudication proceeding that was neither on the record nor on reasonable prior notice to all parties that takes place between:

(i) An interested person not employed by the Bureau (including such person's counsel); and

(ii) The hearing officer handling the proceeding, the Director, or a decisional employee.

(2) Exception. A request for status of the proceeding does not constitute an ex parte communication.

(3) Pendency of an adjudication proceeding means the time from when the Bureau issues a notice of charges, unless the person responsible for the communication has knowledge that a notice of charges will be issued, in which case the pendency of an adjudication shall commence at the time of his or her acquisition of such knowledge, or from when an order by a court of competent jurisdiction remanding a Bureau decision and order for further proceedings becomes effective, until the time the Director enters his or her final decision and order in the proceeding and the time permitted to seek reconsideration of that decision and order has elapsed. For purposes of this section, an order of remand by a court of competent jurisdiction shall be deemed to become effective when the Bureau's right to petition for review or for a writ of certiorari has lapsed without a petition having been filed, or when such a petition has been denied. If a petition for reconsideration of a Bureau decision is filed pursuant to §1081.406, the matter shall be considered to be a pending adjudication proceeding until the time the Bureau enters an order disposing of the petition.

(b) Prohibited ex parte communications. During the pendency of an adjudication proceeding, except to the extent required for the disposition of ex parte matters as authorized by law or as otherwise authorized by this part:

(1) No interested person not employed by the Bureau shall make or knowingly cause to be made to the Director, or to the hearing officer, or to any decisional employee, an ex parte communication; and

(2) The Director, the hearing officer, or any decisional employee shall not make or knowingly cause to be made to any interested person not employed by the Bureau any ex parte communication.

(c) Procedure upon occurrence of ex parte communication. If an ex parte communication prohibited by paragraph (b) of this section is received by the hearing officer, the Director, or any decisional employee, that person shall cause all such written communications (or, if the communication is oral, a memorandum stating the substance of the communication) to be placed on the record of the proceeding and served on all parties. All other parties to the proceeding shall have an opportunity, within ten days of receipt of service of the ex parte communication, to file responses thereto and to recommend any sanctions, in accordance with paragraph (d) of this section, that they believe to be appropriate under the circumstances.

(d) Sanctions—(1) Adverse action on claim. Upon receipt of an ex parte communication knowingly made or knowingly caused to be made by a party and prohibited by paragraph (b) of this section, the Director or hearing officer, as appropriate, may, to the extent consistent with the interests of justice and the policy of the underlying statutes, require the party to show cause why his claim or interest in the proceeding should not be dismissed, denied, disregarded, or otherwise adversely affected on account of such violation.

(2) Discipline of persons practicing before the Bureau. The Director may, to the extent not prohibited by law, censure, suspend, or revoke the privilege to practice before the Bureau of any person who makes, or solicits the making of, an unauthorized ex parte communication.

(e) Separation of functions. Except to the extent required for the disposition of ex parte matters as authorized by law, the hearing officer may not consult a person or party on any matter relevant to the merits of the adjudication, unless upon notice and opportunity for all parties to participate. An employee or agent engaged in the performance of investigative or prosecuting functions for the Bureau in a case, other than the Director, may not, in that or a factually related case, participate or advise in the decision, recommended decision, or agency review of the recommended decision, except as witness or counsel in public proceedings.

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§1081.111   Filing of papers.

(a) Filing. The following papers must be filed by parties in an adjudication proceeding: the notice of charges, proof of service of the notice of charges, notices of appearance, answer, the disclosure statement required under §1081.201(e), motion, brief, request for issuance or enforcement of a subpoena, response, opposition, reply, notice of appeal, or petition for reconsideration. The hearing officer shall file all written orders, rulings, notices, or requests. Any papers required to be filed shall be filed with the Office of Administrative Adjudication, except as otherwise provided herein.

(b) Manner of filing. Unless otherwise specified by the Director or the hearing officer, filing may be accomplished by:

(1) Electronic transmission in accordance with guidance issued by the Office of Administrative Adjudication; or

(2) Any of the following methods if respondent demonstrates, in accordance with guidance issued by the Office of Administrative Adjudication, that electronic filing is not practicable:

(i) Personal delivery;

(ii) Delivery to a reliable commercial courier service or overnight delivery service; or

(iii) Mailing the papers through the U.S. Postal Service by First Class Mail, Registered Mail, Certified Mail or Express Mail.

(c) Papers filed in an adjudication proceeding are presumed to be public. Unless otherwise ordered by the Bureau or the hearing officer, all papers filed in connection with an adjudication proceeding are presumed to be open to the public. The Bureau may provide public access to and publish any papers filed in an adjudication proceeding except if there is a pending motion for a protective order filed pursuant to §1081.119, or if there is an order from the Director, hearing officer, or a Federal court authorizing the confidential treatment of the papers filed.

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§1081.112   Formal requirements as to papers filed.

(a) Form. All papers filed by parties must:

(1) Set forth the name, address, telephone number, and email address of the counsel or party making the filing;

(2) Be double-spaced (except for single-spaced footnotes and single-spaced indented quotations) and printed or typewritten on 812 × 11 inch paper in 12-point or larger font;

(3) Include at the head of the paper, or on a title page, a caption setting forth the title of the case, the docket number of the proceeding, and a brief descriptive title indicating the purpose of the paper;

(4) Be paginated with margins at least one inch wide; and

(5) If filed by other than electronic means, be stapled, clipped or otherwise fastened in a manner that lies flat when opened.

(b) Signature. All papers must be dated and signed as provided in §1081.108.

(c) Number of copies. Unless otherwise specified by the Director or the hearing officer, one copy of all documents and papers shall be filed if filing is by electronic transmission. If filing is accomplished by any other means, an original and one copy of all documents and papers shall be filed, except that only one copy of transcripts of testimony and exhibits must be filed.

(d) Authority to reject document for filing. The Office of Administrative Adjudication or the hearing officer may reject a document for filing that materially fails to comply with these rules.

(e) Sensitive personal information. Sensitive personal information means an individual's Social Security number, taxpayer identification number, financial account number, credit card or debit card number, driver's license number, State-issued identification number, passport number, date of birth (other than year), and any sensitive health information identifiable by individual, such as an individual's medical records. Sensitive personal information shall not be included in, and must be redacted or omitted from, filings unless the person filing the paper determines that such information is relevant or otherwise necessary for the conduct of the proceeding. If the person filing a paper determines the sensitive personal information contained in the paper is relevant or necessary to the proceeding, the person shall file the paper in accordance with paragraph (f) of this section, including filing an expurgated copy of the paper with the sensitive personal information redacted.

(f) Confidential treatment of information in certain filings. A party seeking confidential treatment of information contained in a filing must contemporaneously file either a motion requesting such treatment in accordance with §1081.119 or a copy of the order from the Director, hearing officer, or Federal court authorizing such confidential treatment. The filing must comply with any applicable order of the Director or hearing officer and must be accompanied by:

(1) A complete, sealed copy of the documents containing the materials as to which confidential treatment is sought, with the allegedly confidential material clearly marked as such, and with the first page of the document labeled “Under Seal.” If the movant seeks or has obtained a protective order against disclosure to other parties as well as the public, copies of the documents shall not be served on other parties; and

(2) An expurgated copy of the materials as to which confidential treatment is sought, with the allegedly confidential materials redacted. The redacted version shall indicate any omissions with brackets or ellipses, and its pagination and depiction of text on each page shall be identical to that of the sealed version.

(g) Certificate of service. Any papers filed in an adjudication proceeding shall contain proof of service on all other parties or their counsel in the form of a statement of the date and manner of service and of the names of the persons served, certified by the person who made service. The certificate of service must be affixed to the papers filed and signed in accordance with §1081.108.

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§1081.113   Service of papers.

(a) When required. In every adjudication proceeding, each paper required to be filed by §1081.111 shall be served upon each party in the proceeding in accordance with the provisions of this section; provided, however, that absent an order to the contrary, no service shall be required for motions which are to be heard ex parte.

(b) Upon a person represented by counsel. Whenever service is required to be made upon a person represented by counsel who has filed a notice of appearance pursuant to §1081.107(a)(3), service shall be made pursuant to paragraph (c) of this section upon counsel, unless service upon the person represented is ordered by the Director or the hearing officer, as appropriate.

(c) Method of service. Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section or as otherwise ordered by the hearing officer or the Director, service shall be made by delivering a copy of the filing by one of the following methods:

(1) Transmitting the papers by electronic transmission where the persons so serving each other have consented to service by specified electronic transmission and provided the Bureau and the parties with notice of the means for service by electronic transmission (e.g., email address or facsimile number);

(2) Handing a copy to the person required to be served; or leaving a copy at the person's office with a clerk or other person in charge thereof, or, if there is no one in charge, leaving it in a conspicuous place therein; or, if the office is closed or the person to be served has no office, leaving it at the person's dwelling or usual place of abode with some person of suitable age and discretion then residing therein;

(3) Mailing the papers through the U.S. Postal Service by First Cass Mail, Registered Mail, Certified Mail or Express Mail delivery addressed to the person; or

(4) Sending the papers through a third-party commercial courier service or express delivery service.

(d) Service of certain papers by the Bureau. Service of the notice of charges, recommended decisions and final orders of the Bureau shall be effected as follows:

(1) Service of a notice of charges—(i) To individuals. Notice of a proceeding shall be made to an individual by delivering a copy of the notice of charges to the individual or to an agent authorized by appointment or by law to receive such notice. Delivery, for purposes of this paragraph, means handing a copy of the notice to the individual; or leaving a copy at the individual's office with a clerk or other person in charge thereof; or leaving a copy at the individual's dwelling house or usual place of abode with some person of suitable age and discretion then residing therein; or sending a copy of the notice addressed to the individual through the U.S. Postal Service by Registered Mail, Certified Mail or Express Mail delivery, or by third-party commercial carrier, for overnight delivery and obtaining a confirmation of receipt.

(ii) To corporations or entities. Notice of a proceeding shall be made to a person other than a natural person by delivering a copy of the notice of charges to an officer, managing or general agent, or any other agent authorized by appointment or law to receive such notice, by any method specified in paragraph (d)(1)(i) of this section.

(iii) Upon persons registered with the Bureau. In addition to any other method of service specified in paragraph (d)(1)(i) or (ii) of this section, notice may be made to a person currently registered with the Bureau by sending a copy of the notice of charges addressed to the most recent business address shown on the person's registration form by U.S. Postal Service certified, registered or Express Mail and obtaining a confirmation of receipt or attempted delivery.

(iv) Upon persons in a foreign country. Notice of a proceeding to a person in a foreign country may be made by any method specified in paragraph (d)(1) of this section, or by any other method reasonably calculated to give notice, provided that the method of service used is not prohibited by the law of the foreign country.

(v) Record of service. The Bureau shall maintain and file a record of service of the notice of charges on parties, identifying the party given notice, the method of service, the date of service, the address to which service was made, and the person who made service. If service is made in person, the certificate of service shall state, if available, the name of the individual to whom the notice of charges was given. If service is made by U.S. Postal Service Registered Mail, Certified Mail or Express Mail, the Bureau shall maintain the confirmation of receipt or attempted delivery. If service is made to an agent authorized by appointment to receive service, the certificate of service shall be accompanied by evidence of the appointment.

(vi) Waiver of service. In lieu of service as set forth in paragraph (d)(1)(i) or (d)(1)(ii) of this section, the party may be provided a copy of the notice of charges by First Class Mail or other reliable means if a waiver of service is obtained from the party and placed in the record.

(2) Service of recommended decisions and final orders. Recommended decisions issued by the hearing officer and final orders issued by the Bureau shall be served promptly on each party pursuant to any method of service authorized under paragraph (d)(1) of this section. Such decisions and orders may also be served by electronic transmission if the party to be served has agreed to accept such service in writing, signed by the party or its counsel, and has provided the Bureau with information concerning the manner of electronic transmission.

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§1081.114   Construction of time limits.

(a) General rule. In computing any period of time prescribed by this part, by order of the Director or a hearing officer, or by any applicable statute, the date of the act or event that commences the designated period of time is not included. The last day so computed is included unless it is a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday as set forth in 5 U.S.C. 6103(a). When the last day is a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday, the period runs until the end of the next day that is not a Saturday, Sunday, or Federal holiday. Intermediate Saturdays, Sundays, and Federal holidays are included in the computation of time, except when the time period within which an act is to be performed is ten days or less, not including any additional time allowed for in paragraph (c) of this section.

(b) When papers are deemed to be filed or served. Filing and service are deemed to be effective:

(1) In the case of personal service or same day commercial courier delivery, upon actual receipt by person served;

(2) In the case of overnight commercial delivery service, Express Mail delivery, First Class Mail, Registered Mail, or Certified Mail, upon deposit in or delivery to an appropriate point of collection; or

(3) In the case of electronic transmission, upon transmission.

(c) Calculation of time for service and filing of responsive papers. Whenever a time limit is measured by a prescribed period from the service of any notice or paper, the applicable time limits are calculated as follows:

(1) If service is made by First Class Mail, Registered Mail, or Certified Mail, add three calendar days to the prescribed period;

(2) If service is made by Express Mail or overnight delivery service, add one calendar day to the prescribed period; or

(3) If service is made by electronic transmission, add one calendar day to the prescribed period.

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§1081.115   Change of time limits.

(a) Except as otherwise provided by law, the hearing officer may, in any proceeding before him or her, for good cause shown, extend the time limits prescribed by this part or by any notice or order issued in the proceedings. After appeal to the Director pursuant to §1081.402, the Director may grant extensions of the time limits for good cause shown. Extensions may be granted on the motion of a party after notice and opportunity to respond is afforded all non-moving parties or on the Director's or the hearing officer's own motion, as appropriate.

(b) Considerations in determining whether to extend time limits or grant postponements, adjournments and extensions. In considering all motions for extensions of time filed pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section, the Director or the hearing officer should adhere to a policy of strongly disfavoring granting such motions, except in circumstances where the moving party makes a strong showing that the denial of the motion would substantially prejudice its case. In determining whether to grant any motions, the Director or hearing officer, as appropriate, shall consider, in addition to any other relevant factors:

(1) The length of the proceeding to date;

(2) The number of postponements, adjournments or extensions already granted;

(3) The stage of the proceedings at the time of the motion;

(4) The impact of the motion on the hearing officer's ability to complete the proceeding in the time specified by §1081.400(a); and

(5) Any other matters as justice may require.

(c) Time limit. Postponements, adjournments, or extensions of time for filing papers shall not exceed 21 days unless the Director or the hearing officer, as appropriate, states on the record or sets forth in a written order the reasons why a longer period of time is necessary.

(d) No effect on deadline for recommended decision. The granting of any extension of time pursuant to this section shall not affect any deadlines set pursuant to §1081.400(a).

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§1081.116   Witness fees and expenses.

Respondents shall pay to witnesses subpoenaed for testimony or depositions on their behalf the same fees for attendance and mileage as are paid in the United States district courts in proceedings in which the United States is a party, provided that, in the case of a deposition subpoena addressed to a party, no witness fees or mileage need be paid. Fees for witnesses shall be tendered in advance by any respondent requesting the issuance of a subpoena, except that fees and mileage need not be tendered in advance where the Bureau is the party requesting the subpoena. The Bureau shall pay to witnesses subpoenaed for testimony or depositions on behalf of the Office of Enforcement the same fees for attendance and mileage as are paid in the United States district courts in proceedings in which the United States is a party, but the Bureau need not tender such fees in advance.

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§1081.117   Bureau's right to conduct examination, collect information.

Nothing contained in this part limits in any manner the right of the Bureau to conduct any examination, inspection, or visitation of any person, to conduct or continue any form of investigation authorized by law, to collect information in order to monitor the market for risks to consumers in the offering or provision of consumer financial products or services, or to otherwise gather information in accordance with law.

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§1081.118   Collateral attacks on adjudication proceedings.

Unless a court of competent jurisdiction, or the Director for good cause, so directs, if an interlocutory appeal or collateral attack is brought in any court concerning all or any part of an adjudication proceeding, the challenged adjudication proceeding shall continue without regard to the pendency of that court proceeding. No default or other failure to act as directed in the adjudication proceeding within the times prescribed in this part shall be excused based on the pendency before any court of any interlocutory appeal or collateral attack.

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§1081.119   Confidential information; protective orders.

(a) Rights of third parties. Any party that intends to disclose information obtained from a third party that is subject to a claim of confidentiality must provide notice to the third party at least ten days prior to the proposed disclosure of such information. In response to such notice, the third party may consent to the disclosure of such information, which may be conditioned on the entry of an appropriate protective order, or may intervene in the proceeding for the limited purpose of moving for a protective order pursuant to this section. Any written filing by a party that contains such confidential information must be accompanied by a certification that proper notice was provided. The act of making any oral motion or oral argument by any counsel or party which contains such confidential information constitutes a certification that proper notice was provided. A third party wishing to intervene for purposes of protecting its confidential information may file a single motion, in conformity with all applicable rules, setting forth the basis of both the third party's right to intervene and the basis for the protective order, in conformity with paragraph (b).

(b) Procedure. In any adjudication proceeding, a party, including a third party who has intervened pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section, may file a motion requesting a protective order to limit from disclosure to other parties or to the public documents or testimony that contain confidential information. The motion should include a general summary or extract of the documents or testimony without revealing confidential details, and a copy of the proposed protective order. A motion for confidential treatment of documents should be filed in accordance with §1081.112(f), and all other applicable rules.

(c) Basis for issuance. Documents and testimony introduced in a public hearing, or filed in connection with an adjudication proceeding, are presumed to be public. A motion for a protective order shall be granted:

(1) Upon a finding that public disclosure will likely result in a clearly defined, serious injury to the party or third party requesting confidential treatment;

(2) After finding that the material constitutes sensitive personal information, as defined in §1081.112(e);

(3) If all parties, including third parties to the extent their information is at issue, stipulate to the entry of a protective order; or

(4) Where public disclosure is prohibited by law.

(d) Requests for additional information supporting confidentiality. The hearing officer may require a movant under paragraph (b) of this section to furnish in writing additional information with respect to the grounds for confidentiality. Failure to supply the information so requested within five days from the date of receipt by the movant of a notice of the information required shall be deemed a waiver of the objection to public disclosure of that portion of the documents to which the additional information relates, unless the hearing officer shall otherwise order for good cause shown at or before the expiration of such five-day period.

(e) Confidentiality of documents pending decision. Pending a determination of a motion under this section, the documents as to which confidential treatment is sought and any other documents that would reveal the confidential information in those documents shall be maintained under seal and shall be disclosed only in accordance with orders of the hearing officer. Any order issued in connection with a motion under this section shall be public unless the order would disclose information as to which a protective order has been granted, in which case that portion of the order that would reveal the protected information shall be nonpublic.

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§1081.120   Settlement.

(a) Availability. Any respondent in an adjudication proceeding instituted under this part, may, at any time, propose in writing an offer of settlement.

(b) Procedure. An offer of settlement shall state that it is made pursuant to this section; shall recite or incorporate as a part of the offer the provisions of paragraphs (c)(3) and (4) of this section; shall be signed by the person making the offer, not by counsel; and shall be submitted to enforcement counsel.

(c) Consideration of offers of settlement. (1) Offers of settlement shall be considered when time, the nature of the proceedings, and the public interest permit.

(2) Any settlement offer shall be presented to the Director with a recommendation, except that, if the recommendation is unfavorable, the offer shall not be presented to the Director unless the person making the offer so requests.

(3) By submitting an offer of settlement, the person making the offer waives, subject to acceptance of the offer:

(i) All hearings pursuant to the statutory provisions under which the proceeding has been instituted;

(ii) The filing of proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law;

(iii) Proceedings before, and a recommended decision by, a hearing officer;

(iv) All post-hearing procedures;

(v) Judicial review by any court; and

(vi) Any objection to the jurisdiction of the Bureau under section 1053 of the Dodd-Frank Act.

(4) By submitting an offer of settlement the person further waives:

(i) Such provisions of this part or other requirements of law as may be construed to prevent any Bureau employee from participating in the preparation of, or advising the Director as to, any order, opinion, finding of fact, or conclusion of law to be entered pursuant to the offer; and

(ii) Any right to claim bias or prejudgment by the Director based on the consideration of or discussions concerning settlement of all or any part of the proceeding.

(5) If the Director rejects the offer of settlement, the person making the offer shall be notified of the Director's action and the offer of settlement shall be deemed withdrawn. The rejected offer shall not constitute a part of the record in any proceeding against the person making the offer, provided, however, that rejection of an offer of settlement does not affect the continued validity of waivers pursuant to paragraph (c)(4) of this section with respect to any discussions concerning the rejected offer of settlement.

(d) Consent orders. If the Director accepts the offer of settlement, all terms and conditions of a settlement entered into under this section shall be recorded in a written stipulation signed by all settling parties, and a consent order concluding the proceeding. The stipulation and consent order shall be filed pursuant to §1081.111, and shall recite or incorporate as a part of the stipulation the provisions of paragraphs (c)(3) and (4) of this section. The Director will then issue a consent order, which shall be a final order concluding the proceeding.

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§1081.121   Cooperation with other agencies.

It is the policy of the Bureau to cooperate with other governmental agencies to avoid unnecessary overlap or duplication of regulatory functions.

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