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Title 7 Part 51 → Subpart

Title 7 → Subtitle B → Chapter I → Subchapter C → Part 51 → Subpart

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 7 Part 51 → Subpart

e-CFR data is current as of November 14, 2019

Title 7Subtitle BChapter ISubchapter CPart 51 → Subpart


Title 7: Agriculture
PART 51—FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS)


Subpart—United States Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type)1


Contents

Grades

§51.880   U.S. Extra Fancy Table.
§51.881   U.S. Extra Fancy Export.
§51.882   U.S. Fancy Table.
§51.883   U.S. Fancy Export.
§51.884   U.S. No. 1 Table.
§51.885   U.S. No. 1 Institutional.

Tolerances

§51.886   Tolerances.

Application of Tolerances

§51.887   Application of tolerances.

Maturity Requirements

§51.888   Maturity requirements.

Definitions

§51.889   Well developed grapes.
§51.890   One variety.
§51.891   Uniform in appearance.
§51.892   Color terms.
§51.893   Firm.
§51.894   Weak.
§51.895   Shriveled at capstem.
§51.896   Shattered.
§51.897   Wet.
§51.898   Decay.
§51.899   Waterberry.
§51.900   Sunburn.
§51.901   Damage.
§51.902   Fairly well filled.
§51.903   Excessively tight.
§51.904   Shot berries.
§51.905   Dried berries.
§51.906   Well developed and strong.
§51.907   Diameter.
§51.908   Serious damage.
§51.909   Materially shriveled at capstem.
§51.910   Straggly.
§51.911   Container.
§51.912   Export.
§51.913   Clusters.

Metric Conversion Table

§51.914   Metric conversion table.

1Packing of the product in conformity with the requirements of these standards shall not excuse failure to comply with the provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act or with applicable State laws and regulations.

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Grades

§51.880   U.S. Extra Fancy Table.

“U.S. Extra Fancy Table” consists of bunches of well developed grapes of one variety, except when designated as assorted varieties, which are uniform in appearance, well colored, and which meet the following requirements:

(a) Basic requirements for berries:

(1) Mature;

(2) Firm;

(3) Firmly attached to capstem;

(4) Not weak;

(5) Not shriveled at capstem;

(6) Not shattered;

(7) Not split or crushed;

(8) Not wet.

(b) Basic requirements for bunches:

(1) Fairly well filled;

(2) Not excessively tight for the variety.

(c) Basic requirements for stems:

(1) Well developed and strong;

(2) Not dry and brittle;

(3) At least yellowish-green in color except for Cardinal, Robin, Exotic, and Beauty Seedless varieties.

(d) Berries free from:

(1) Decay;

(2) Waterberry;

(3) Sunburn;

(4) Almeria Spot.

(e) Stems free from:

(1) Mold;

(2) Decay.

(f) Berries not damaged by:

(1) Any other cause.

(g) Bunches not damaged by:

(1) Shot berries;

(2) Dried berries;

(3) Other defective berries;

(4) Trimming away of defective berries;

(5) Any other cause.

(h) Stems not damaged by:

(1) Freezing;

(2) Any other cause.

(i) Size:

(1) For berries: Exclusive of shot berries and dried berries, not less than 90 percent, by count, of the berries on each bunch shall have the minimum diameters indicated for varieties as follows:

(i) Ribier, Cardinal, Robin, Exotic, Queen, Italia Muscat, and other similar varieties thirteen-sixteenths of an inch.

(ii) Other varieties eleven-sixteenths of an inch.

(2) For bunches:

(i) Not less than one-half pound.

(j) For tolerances see §51.886.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981, and amended at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.881   U.S. Extra Fancy Export.

“U.S. Extra Fancy Export” consists of grapes which meet the requirements for U.S. Extra Fancy Table and, in addition, meet the packaging requirements set forth in §51.911.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981]

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§51.882   U.S. Fancy Table.

“U.S. Fancy Table” consists of bunches of well developed grapes of one variety, except when designated as assorted varieties, which are at least reasonably well colored, uniform in appearance when so specified in connection with the grade, and which meet the following requirements:

(a) Basic requirements for berries:

(1) Mature;

(2) Firm;

(3) Firmly attached to capstem;

(4) Not weak;

(5) Not shriveled at capstem;

(6) Not shattered;

(7) Not split or crushed;

(8) Not wet.

(b) Basic requirements for bunches:

(1) Fairly well filled;

(2) Not excessively tight for the variety.

(c) Basic requirements for stems:

(1) Well developed and strong;

(2) Not dry and brittle.

(d) Berries free from:

(1) Decay;

(2) Waterberry;

(3) Sunburn;

(4) Almeria Spot.

(e) Stems free from:

(1) Mold;

(2) Decay.

(f) Berries not damaged by:

(1) Any other cause.

(g) Bunches not damaged by:

(1) Shot berries;

(2) Dried berries;

(3) Other defective berries;

(4) Trimming away of defective berries;

(5) Any other cause.

(h) Stems not damaged by:

(1) Freezing;

(2) Any other cause.

(i) Size:

(1) For berries: Exclusive of shot berries and dried berries, the following percentages, by count, of the berries on each bunch shall have the minimum diameters indicated for varieties as follows:

(i) For Ribier, Cardinal, Robin, Exotic, Queen, Italia Muscat, and other similar varieties, 90 percent shall be at least twelve-sixteenths of an inch;

(ii) For Thompson Seedless, Perlette, Delight, Beauty Seedless, Sugraone, Flame Seedless and other seedless varieties, 75 percent shall be at least ten-sixteenths of an inch; and,

(iii) For other varieties 90 percent shall be at least ten-sixteenths of an inch.

(2) For bunches:

(i) Not less than one-fourth pound.

(j) For tolerances see §51.886.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981, and amended at 48 FR 19350, Apr. 29, 1983; 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991; 64 FR 14576, Mar. 26, 1999]

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§51.883   U.S. Fancy Export.

“U.S. Fancy Export” consists of grapes which meet the requirements for U.S. Fancy Table, except that bunches shall weigh not less than one-half pound, and in addition meet the packaging requirements set forth in §51.912.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981, and amended at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.884   U.S. No. 1 Table.

“U.S. No. 1 Table” consists of bunches of well developed grapes of one variety, except when designated as assorted varieties, which are at least fairly well colored, uniform in appearance when so specified in connection with the grade, and which meet the following requirements:

(a) Basic requirements for berries:

(1) Mature;

(2) Firm;

(3) Firmly attached to capstem;

(4) Not weak;

(5) Not materially shriveled at capstem;

(6) Not shattered;

(7) Not split or crushed;

(8) Not wet.

(b) Basic requirements for bunches:

(1) Not straggly.

(c) Basic requirements for stems:

(1) Not weak, or dry and brittle.

(d) Berries free from:

(1) Decay;

(2) Waterberry;

(3) Sunburn.

(e) Stems free from:

(1) Mold;

(2) Decay.

(f) Berries not damaged by:

(1) Any other cause.

(g) Bunches not damaged by:

(1) Shot berries;

(2) Dried berries;

(3) Other defective berries;

(4) Trimming away of defective berries;

(5) Any other cause.

(h) Stems not damaged by:

(1) Freezing;

(2) Any other cause.

(i) Size:

(1) For berries: Exclusive of shot berries and dried berries, 75 percent, by count, of the berries on each bunch shall have the minimum diameters indicated for varieties as follows:

(i) Thompson Seedless, Perlette, Delight, Beauty Seedless, Sugraone, Flame Seedless and other seedless varieties nine-sixteenths of an inch.

(ii) Other varieties ten-sixteenths of an inch.

(2) For bunches:

(i) Not less than one-fourth pound.

(j) For tolerances see §51.886.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981, and amended at 48 FR 19350, Apr. 29, 1983; 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991; 64 FR 14576, Mar. 26, 1999]

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§51.885   U.S. No. 1 Institutional.

“U.S. No. 1 Institutional” grapes must have no less than 95 percent of the containers in the lot legibly marked “Institutional Pack.” Further requirements for this grade include grapes which consist of clusters and/or bunches of well developed grapes of one variety, except when designated as assorted varieties, which are at least fairly well colored, uniform in appearance when so specified in connection with the grade, and which meet the following requirements:

(a) Basic requirements for berries:

(1) Mature;

(2) Firm;

(3) Firmly attached to capstem;

(4) Not weak;

(5) Not materially shriveled at capstem;

(6) Not shattered;

(7) Not split or crushed;

(8) Not wet.

(b) Basic requirements for stems: Not weak, or dry and brittle.

(c) Berries free from:

(1) Decay;

(2) Waterberry;

(3) Sunburn.

(d) Stems free from:

(1) Mold;

(2) Decay.

(e) Berries not damaged by: Any other cause.

(f) Bunches not damaged by:

(1) Shot berries;

(2) Dried berries;

(3) Other defective berries;

(4) Any other cause.

(g) Stems not damaged by:

(1) Freezing;

(2) Any other cause.

(h) Size:

(1) For berries: Exclusive of shot berries and dried berries, 75 percent, by count, of the berries on each bunch shall have the minimum diameters indicated for varieties as follows:

(i) Thompson Seedless, Perlette, Delight, Beauty Seedless, Sugraone, Flame Seedless and other seedless varieties nine-sixteenths of an inch.

(ii) Other varieties ten-sixteenths of an inch.

(2) For clusters/bunches: In this grade grapes shall consist of at least a two berry cluster ranging to clusters and/or bunches of grapes not greater than five ounces in weight. See section 51.913.

(i) For tolerances see section 51.886.

[61 FR 11126, Mar. 19, 1996, as amended at 64 FR 14576, Mar. 26, 1999]

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Tolerances

§51.886   Tolerances.

(a) No tolerances are provided in these standards for grapes which fail to meet the applicable maturity requirements other than the allowances specified in §51.888 or in the sampling and testing procedures of State maturity regulations.

(b) In order to allow for variations incident to proper grading and handling in each of the foregoing grades except U.S. No. 1 Institutional, tolerances, by weight, other than for maturity, are provided as set forth in Tables I and II.

Table I—Tolerances at Shipping Point1

[Percent]

FactorU.S. Extra fancy tableU.S. Fancy tableU.S. No. 1 table
(A) For bunches failing to meet color requirements101010
(B) For bunches failing to meet requirements for minimum diameter of berries101010
(C) For bunches failing to meet stem color requirements10
(D) For offsize bunches and for bunches and berries failing to meet the remaining requirements for the grade888
Including in (D):
(a) For serious damage222
And, including in (a):
(i) For decay 12 of 1 12 of 1 12 of 1

1Shipping Point, as used in these standards, means the point of origin of the shipment in the producing area or at port of loading for ship stores or overseas shipment, or, in the case of shipments from outside the continental United States, the port of entry into the United States.

Table II—Tolerances En Route or at Destination

(A) For bunches failing to meet color requirements101010
(B) For bunches failing to meet requirements for minimum diameter of berries101010
(C) For bunches failing to meet stem color requirements10
(D) For offsize bunches and for bunches and berries failing to meet the remaining requirements for the grade121212
Including in (D):
(a) For permanent defects888
(b) For serious damage444
And, including in (b):
(i) For serious damage by permanent defects222
(ii) For decay111

(c) In order to allow for variations incident to proper grading and handling in the U.S. No. 1 Institutional grade only, tolerances, by weight, other than for maturity, are provided as set forth in Tables Ia and IIa of this section.

Table Ia—Tolerances at Shipping Point for U.S. No. 1 Institutional Grade Only1

[Percent]

FactorU.S. No. 1 institutional
(A) For clusters/bunches failing to meet color requirements10.
(B) For clusters/bunches failing to meet requirements for minimum diameter of berries10.
(C) For offsize clusters/bunches4.
(D) For clusters/bunches and berries failing to meet the remaining requirements for the grade8.
Including in (D):
(a) For serious damage2
And, including in (a):
(i) For decay 12 of 1.

1Shipping point, as used in these standards, means the point of origin of the shipment in the producing area or at port of loading for ship stores or overseas shipment, or, in the case of shipments from outside the continental United States, the port of entry into the United States.

Table IIa—Tolerances En Route or at Destination for U.S. No. 1 Institutional Grade Only

FactorU.S. No. 1 institutional
(A) For clusters/bunches failing to meet color requirements10.
(B) For clusters/bunches failing to meet requirements for minimum diameter of berries10.
(C) For offsize clusters/bunches4.
(D) For clusters/bunches and berries failing to meet the remaining requirements for the grade12.
Including in (D):
(a) For permanent defects8.
(b) For serious damage4.
And, including in (b):
(i) For serious damage by permanent defects2.
(ii) For decay1.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981, and amended at 52 FR 22437, June 12, 1987. Redesignated and amended at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991; 61 FR 11127, Mar. 19, 1996]

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Application of Tolerances

§51.887   Application of tolerances.

The contents of the individual packages in any lot, based on sample inspection, are subject to the following limitations: Provided, That the averages for the entire lot are within the tolerances specified for the grade:

(a) For tolerances of 10 percent or more, individual packages may contain not more than one and one-half times the specified tolerance.

(b) For a tolerance of less than 10 percent, individual packages may contain not more than double the specified tolerance.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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Maturity Requirements

§51.888   Maturity requirements.

(a) In the case of grapes grown in Arizona or California, “mature” means grapes in any lot shall meet the maturity requirements for the variety as set forth in the applicable State Agricultural Laws and Regulations referenced in this section. This incorporation by reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from, in the case of Arizona maturity regulations, Arizona Department of Agriculture, Citrus, Fruit and Vegetable Standardization, 1688 W. Adams, Phoenix, AZ 85007 or in the case of California maturity regulations, California Department of Food and Agriculture, Fruit and Vegetable Quality Control, Standardization Section, 1220 N Street, P.O. Box 942871, Sacramento, California 94271-0001 or copies of both regulations may be inspected at USDA, AMS, F&VD, FPB, Standardization Section, Room 2065-S, 14th and Independence Avenue, Washington, DC 20250 or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal__register/code__of__federal__regulations/ibr__locations.html.

(1) Arizona maturity regulations are contained in Chapter 4—Plant Services Division, Article 7, Fruit And Vegetable Standardization, Section R3-4-733 Table Grape Standards, Effective January 6, 1994.

(2) California maturity regulations are contained in The California Code of Regulations, Title 3, Subchapter 4. Fresh Fruits, Nuts and Vegetables, Article 25, Table Grapes and Raisins, November 16, 1996.

(b) Grapes subject to U.S. import regulations shall meet the maturity requirements specified in such regulations.

(c) Grapes produced in States other than Arizona or California, or grapes imported from countries outside the United States during periods in which U.S. import regulations do not apply, shall meet the minimum percentage of soluble solids set forth in Table III as determined by use of a standard hand refractometer.

Table III

VarietyPercent of soluble solids
Muscat17.5
All varieties not listed in this table16.5
Cardinal, Emperor, Perlette, Ribier, Olivette Blanche, Rish Baba, Red Malaga, and similar varieties15.5

(1) The minimum percentage of soluble solids for any lot shall be determined from the juice of at least 10 percent, by weight, of whole bunches of the least mature grapes in that container which appears to have the least mature grapes. No lot shall be considered as failing to meet these requirements unless samples from two containers which appear to have the least mature grapes test below the required percentage of soluble solids.

[48 FR 19350, Apr. 29, 1983, as amended at 52 FR 22437, June 12, 1987. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991; 61 FR 11127, Mar. 19, 1996; 64 FR 14577, Mar. 26, 1999]

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Definitions

§51.889   Well developed grapes.

Well developed grapes means grapes which are not abnormally small for the variety.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.890   One variety.

One variety means that the grapes show similar varietal characteristics.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.891   Uniform in appearance.

Uniform in appearance means that not more than one-tenth of the containers in any lot show sufficient variation in color or size of berries to materially detract from the appearance of the contents of the individual container, and that the stems are well developed and strong.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.892   Color terms.

The color terms well colored, reasonably well colored, and fairly well colored are defined in Table IV.

Table IV

Color termsBlack varietiesRed varietiesWhite varieties
Well colored (U.S. Extra Fancy)Each bunch shall have not less than 95 percent, by count, of berries showing good characteristic color.1Each bunch shall have not less than 75 percent, by count, of berries showing good characteristic color.1No requirement.
Reasonably well colored (U.S. Fancy)Each bunch shall have not less than 85 percent, by count, of berries showing good characteristic color.1Each bunch shall have not less than 6623 percent, by count, of berries showing good characteristic color1 except the Tokay and Cardinal varieties shall have not less than 75 percent, by count, of berries showing characteristic color.2No requirement.
Fairly well colored (U.S. No. 1)Each bunch shall have not less than 75 percent, by count, of berries showing characteristic color.2Each bunch shall have not less than 60 percent, by count, of berries showing characteristic color.2No requirement.

1Good characteristic color for black varieties means purple to black except that Ribier or similar varieties of grapes shall have at least two-thirds of the surface of the berry showing purple to black color.

For red varieties good characteristic color means at least two-thirds of the surface of the berry is light red through dark red color; except, for the Tokay variety pink through dark red, and for the Cardinal variety light red through purple shall be permitted.

2Characteristic color for black varieties means reddish-purple to black except that Ribier or similar varieties of grapes shall have at least two-thirds of the surface of the berry showing reddish-purple to black color.

For red varieties characteristic color means at least two-thirds of the surface of the berry is pink to dark red; except, for the Tokay variety light pink through dark red and for the Cardinal variety light pink through purple color shall be permitted.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.893   Firm.

Firm means that the berry does not yield more than slightly to moderate pressure and is not flabby or wilted.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.894   Weak.

Weak means that individual berries are somewhat translucent, watery and soft, may have relatively low sugar content, inferior flavor, or are of poor keeping quality.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.895   Shriveled at capstem.

Shriveled at capstem means that the berry shows more than slight wrinkling of the skin surrounding the capstem.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.896   Shattered.

Shattered means that the berry is separated from the bunch and may or may not have the capstem attached.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.897   Wet.

Wet means that the grapes are wet from moisture from crushed, leaking, or decayed berries or from rain. Grapes which are moist from dew or other moisture condensation such as that resulting from removing grapes from a refrigerator car or cold storage to a warmer location shall not be considered as wet.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.898   Decay.

Decay means any soft breakdown of the flesh or skin of the berry resulting from bacterial or fungus infection. Slight surface development of green mold (Cladosporium) shall not be considered decay.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.899   Waterberry.

Waterberry means a watery, soft, or flabby condition of the berry. Affected berries are low in sugar content, have tender skins, and are easily crushed. This is an advanced or more pronounced stage of the condition referred to as “weak”.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.900   Sunburn.

Sunburn means injury to the berry caused by exposure to the sun, including “sulphur burn,” usually occurring as a sunken and discolored or dried area on the exposed surface.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.901   Damage.

Damage means any specific defect described in this section; or an equally objectionable variation of any one of these defects, or any other defect, or any combination of defects which materially detracts from the appearance, or the edible or marketing quality of the individual berry, the appearance of the bunch as a whole, or the marketing quality of the stems.

(a) The following shall be considered as damage to the individual berry:

(1) Scarring such as that caused by thrips, mildew, rubs, and similar injuries when materially detracting from the appearance of the berry;

(2) Discoloration when any light brown, tan, or darker discoloration of the skin materially detracts from the appearance of the berry: Provided, That “sunkissed” berries of the white Malaga variety which show discoloration of amber or light brown color shall not be considered as damaged. “Buckskin” berries of the Tokay variety, and similar injury to other varieties, shall be considered as damaged by discoloration;

(3) Heat when the flesh of the berry is affected;

(4) Almeria Spot when any spot is distinctly sunken or dark in color;

(5) Mildew when active powdery mildew is present;

(6) Freezing when the berry is frozen or when the flesh of the berry is affected by freezing;

(7) Insect injury when penetrating the skin of the berry or when there is noticeable insect infestation on the bunch; when mealybug residue or aphis honeydew are present in noticeable amounts; or when leafhopper residue materially detracts from the appearance of the individual berry or of the bunch.

(b) The following shall be considered as damage to stems:

(1) Active powdery mildew or any other disease when present on the stems to the extent that it detracts from the appearance of the bunch or when scars caused by mildew or other disease constrict or weaken any part of the main or lateral stems; and,

(2) Freezing when the stems are frozen or the capstems are swollen or dried, or when the main or lateral stems are water-soaked and limp, or dried, as a result of freezing.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.902   Fairly well filled.

Fairly well filled means that the berries are reasonably closely spaced on main and lateral stems and that the bunch is not very loose or stringy.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.903   Excessively tight.

Excessively tight means that the berries are so wedged together that the bunch is extremely compact for the variety and resulting distorted berries materially detract from the appearance of the bunch.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.904   Shot berries.

Shot berries means very small berries resulting from insufficient pollination, usually seedless in those varieties which normally develop seeds.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.905   Dried berries.

Dried berries means berries which are dry and shriveled to the extent that practically no moisture is present.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.906   Well developed and strong.

Well developed and strong means that the main and lateral stems are firm, fibrous, and pliable; not distinctly immature or spindly or threadlike at time of packing.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.907   Diameter.

Diameter means the greatest dimension of the berry taken at right angles to a line running from the stem to the blossom end.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.908   Serious damage.

Serious damage means any defect or any combination of defects which seriously detracts from the appearance, or the edible or marketing quality of the grapes and includes berries which are split, crushed, wet, affected by decay or waterberry, or affected by heat or freezing. Grapes which show healed cracks at the blossom and shall not be considered as seriously damaged.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.909   Materially shriveled at capstem.

Materially shriveled at capstem means that the skin of the berry is definitely wrinkled adjacent to the capstem and the surface is materially sunken.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.910   Straggly.

Straggly means that the berries are so widely spaced on main and laterial stems that the bunch is distinctly open or very stemmy or stringy in structure.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.911   Container.

Container as used in these standards shall, for the purposes of determining maturity and other factors of grade of grapes in packages containing 5 pounds or less, mean the master container in which the individual packages are packed for shipment.

[52 FR 22437, June 12, 1987. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.912   Export.

When designated as Export, grapes shall be packed with any of the customary protective materials such as cushions, liners, or wraps, or properly packed in sawdust or granulated cork. The so-called “semi-sawdust packs” which are cushioned and/or covered with sawdust are not approved as protective packaging for export.

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991]

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§51.913   Clusters.

Clusters as used in these standards in reference to the U.S. No. 1 Institutional grade only shall be defined as two or more berries sharing a common point of attachment.

[61 FR 11127, Mar. 19, 1996]

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Metric Conversion Table

§51.914   Metric conversion table.

InchesMillimeters (mm)
316 equals12.7
916 equals14.3
1016 equals15.9
1116 equals17.5
1216 equals19.1
1316 equals20.6
1416 equals22.2
1516 equals28.8
1 equals25.4
PoundsGrams
14 equals113.4
12 equals226.8
34 equals340.2
1 equals453.6
2 equals907.2
3 equals1,360.8
4 equals1,814.4
5 equals2,268.0
10 equals4,536.0

[36 FR 9126, May 20, 1971. Redesignated at 42 FR 32514, June 27, 1977, and further redesignated at 46 FR 63203, Dec. 31, 1981. Redesignated at 56 FR 15802, Apr. 18, 1991, and further redesignated at 61 FR 11127, Mar. 19, 1996]

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