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Title 45 Part 1160 → §1160.5

Title 45 → Subtitle B → Chapter XI → Subchapter C → Part 1160 → §1160.5

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 45 Part 1160 → §1160.5

e-CFR data is current as of October 10, 2019

Title 45Subtitle BChapter XISubchapter CPart 1160 → §1160.5


Title 45: Public Welfare
PART 1160—INDEMNITIES UNDER THE ARTS AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT


§1160.5   Eligibility for domestic exhibitions.

An indemnity agreement for a domestic exhibition made under these regulations shall cover eligible items from the United States while on Exhibition in the United States.

(a)(1) Example 1. An American museum is undergoing renovation and will be closed to the public for one year. During that time, masterpieces from the collection will go on tour to three other museums in the United States. Many of these works have never been lent for travel, and this will be a unique and the last opportunity for museum visitors in other parts of the country to see them exhibited together. Once the new building opens, they will be permanently installed and dispersed throughout the museum's galleries.

(2) Discussion. (i) This is a straightforward example of a domestic exhibition which would be eligible for consideration for indemnity coverage. Under the previous regulations, eligibility was limited to:

(A) Exhibitions in the United States of entirely foreign-owned objects;

(B) Exhibitions outside of the United States of domestic-owned objects; or

(C) Exhibitions in the United States of both foreign- and domestic-owned objects, with the foreign-owned objects having integral importance to the exhibition.

(ii) In this example, the Federal Council will consider the educational, cultural, historical, or scientific significance of the proposed domestic exhibition of the domestic-owned objects. It would not be necessary for the U.S. Department of State to determine whether or not the exhibition was in the national interest.

(b)(1) Example 2. An American museum is organizing an exhibition of works by 20th century American artists, which will travel to one other U.S. museum. There are more than 100 objects in the exhibition. The majority of the paintings, drawings and sculpture, valued at more than $500,000,000, are from galleries, museums and private collections in the United States. The organizing curator has selected ten works of art, mostly drawings and preparatory sketches relating to paintings in the exhibition, valued at less than $5,000,000, which will be borrowed from foreign lenders.

(2) Discussion. (i) This example raises the question of whether this applicant should submit an application for indemnity coverage for a domestic exhibition or an international exhibition. If the applicant submitted an application for an international exhibition requesting coverage for only the foreign-owned objects eligible under Section 1160.4(a), the Federal Council would evaluate whether the ten foreign-owned objects further the exhibition's educational, cultural, historical, or scientific purposes. It would also be necessary for the U.S. Department of State to determine whether or not the exhibition was in the national interest. In this case, the applicant would have to insure the loans of the domestic-owned objects by other means.

(ii) In the case of an application for an international exhibition requesting coverage for both domestic-owned and foreign-owned objects eligible under section 1160.4(a) and (c), the Federal Council would evaluate the exhibition as a whole to determine if the ten foreign-owned objects are integral to achieving the exhibition's educational, cultural, historical, or scientific purposes. It would also be necessary for the U.S. Department of State to determine whether or not the exhibition was in the national interest.

(iii) If the applicant submitted an application for a domestic exhibition, however, only the loans of domestic-owned objects, the highest valued part of the exhibition, would be eligible for coverage. The Federal Council would consider if the U.S. loans were of educational, cultural or historic interest. It would not be necessary for the U.S. Department of State to determine whether or not the exhibition was in the national interest. In this case, the applicant would have to insure the loans of the foreign-owned objects by other means.

[73 FR 21056, Apr. 18, 2008]


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