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Title 45 Part 1370

Title 45 → Subtitle B → Chapter XIII → Subchapter H → Part 1370

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 45 Part 1370

e-CFR data is current as of August 14, 2018

Title 45Subtitle BChapter XIIISubchapter H → Part 1370


Title 45: Public Welfare


PART 1370—FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS


Contents

Subpart A—General Provisions

§1370.1   What are the purposes of the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act Programs?

This part addresses sections 301 through 313 of the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA), as amended, and codified at 42 U.S.C. 10401 et seq. FVPSA authorizes the Secretary to implement programs for the purposes of increasing public awareness about and preventing family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence; providing immediate shelter and supportive services for victims of family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence and their dependents; providing for technical assistance and training relating to family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence programs; providing for State Domestic Violence Coalitions; providing specialized services for abused parents and their children; and operating a national domestic violence hotline. FVPSA emphasizes both primary, and secondary, prevention of violence.

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§1370.2   What definitions apply to these programs?

For the purposes of this part:

Dating violence means violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim and where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors: The length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. This part of the definition reflects the definition also found in Section 40002(a) of VAWA (as amended), 42 U.S.C. 13925(a), as required by FVPSA. Dating violence also includes but is not limited to the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional violence within a dating relationship, including stalking. It can happen in person or electronically, and may involve financial abuse or other forms of manipulation which may occur between a current or former dating partner regardless of actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity.

Domestic violence means felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person's acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction. This definition also reflects the statutory definition of “domestic violence” found in Section 40002(a) of VAWA (as amended), 42 U.S.C. 13925(a). This definition also includes but is not limited to criminal or non-criminal acts constituting intimidation, control, coercion and coercive control, emotional and psychological abuse and behavior, expressive and psychological aggression, financial abuse, harassment, tormenting behavior, disturbing or alarming behavior, and additional acts recognized in other Federal, Tribal State, and local laws as well as acts in other Federal regulatory or sub-regulatory guidance. This definition is not intended to be interpreted more restrictively than FVPSA and VAWA but rather to be inclusive of other, more expansive definitions. The definition applies to individuals and relationships regardless of actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity.

Family violence means any act or threatened act of violence, including any forceful detention of an individual, that results or threatens to result in physical injury and is committed by a person against another individual, to or with whom such person is related by blood or marriage, or is or was otherwise legally related, or is or was lawfully residing.

Personally identifying information (PII) or personal information is individually identifying information for or about an individual including information likely to disclose the location of a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, regardless of whether the information is encoded, encrypted, hashed, or otherwise protected, including, a first and last name; a home or other physical address; contact information (including a postal, email or Internet protocol address, or telephone or facsimile number); a social security number, driver license number, passport number, or student identification number; and any other information, including date of birth, racial or ethnic background, or religious affiliation, that would serve to identify any individual.

Primary prevention means strategies, policies, and programs to stop both first-time perpetration and first-time victimization. Primary prevention is stopping domestic and dating violence before they occur. Primary prevention includes, but is not limited to: School-based violence prevention curricula, programs aimed at mitigating the effects on children of witnessing domestic or dating violence, community campaigns designed to alter norms and values conducive to domestic or dating violence, worksite prevention programs, and training and education in parenting skills and self-esteem enhancement.

Primary-purpose domestic violence service provider, for the term only as it appears in the definition of State Domestic Violence Coalition, means an entity that operates a project of demonstrated effectiveness carried out by a nonprofit, nongovernmental, private entity, Tribe, or Tribal organization, that has as its project's primary-purpose the operation of shelters and supportive services for victims of domestic violence and their dependents; or has as its project's primary purpose counseling, advocacy, or self-help services to victims of domestic violence. Territorial Domestic Violence Coalitions may include government-operated domestic violence projects as primary-purpose domestic violence service providers for complying with the membership requirement, provided that Territorial Coalitions can document providing training, technical assistance, and capacity-building of community-based and privately operated projects to provide shelter and supportive services to victims of family, domestic, or dating violence, with the intention of recruiting such projects as members once they are sustainable as primary-purpose domestic violence service providers.

Secondary prevention is identifying risk factors or problems that may lead to future family, domestic, or dating violence, and taking the necessary actions to eliminate the risk factors and the potential problem, and may include, but are not limited to, healing services for children and youth who have been exposed to domestic or dating violence, home visiting programs for high-risk families, and screening programs in health care settings.

Shelter means the provision of temporary refuge in conjunction with supportive services in compliance with applicable State or Tribal law or regulations governing the provision, on a regular basis, of shelter, safe homes, meals, and supportive services to victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their dependents. State and Tribal law governing the provision of shelter and supportive services on a regular basis is interpreted by ACF to mean, for example, the laws and regulations applicable to zoning, fire safety, and other regular safety, and operational requirements, including State, Tribal, or local regulatory standards for certifying domestic violence advocates who work in shelter. This definition also includes emergency shelter and immediate shelter, which may include housing provision, rental subsidies, temporary refuge, or lodging in properties that could be individual units for families and individuals (such as apartments) in multiple locations around a local jurisdiction, Tribe/reservation, or State; such properties are not required to be owned, operated, or leased by the program. Temporary refuge includes a residential service, including shelter and off-site services such as hotel or motel vouchers or individual dwellings, which is not transitional or permanent housing, but must also provide comprehensive supportive services. The mere act of making a referral to shelter or housing shall not itself be considered provision of shelter. Should other jurisdictional laws conflict with this definition of temporary refuge, the definition which provides more expansive housing accessibility governs.

State means each of the several States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and, except as otherwise provided in statute, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

State Domestic Violence Coalition means a Statewide, nongovernmental, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization whose membership includes a majority of the primary-purpose domestic violence service providers in the State; whose board membership is representative of these primary-purpose domestic violence service providers and which may include representatives of the communities in which the services are being provided in the State; that has as its purpose to provide education, support, and technical assistance to such service providers to enable the providers to establish and maintain supportive services and to provide shelter to victims of domestic violence and their children; and that serves as an information clearinghouse, primary point of contact, and resource center on domestic violence for the State and supports the development of policies, protocols and procedures to enhance domestic violence intervention and prevention in the State/Territory.

Supportive services means services for adult and youth victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their dependents that are designed to meet the needs of such victims and their dependents for short-term, transitional, or long-term safety and recovery. Supportive services include, but are not limited to: Direct and/or referral-based advocacy on behalf of victims and their dependents, counseling, case management, employment services, referrals, transportation services, legal advocacy or assistance, child care services, health, behavioral health and preventive health services, culturally and linguistically appropriate services, and other services that assist victims or their dependents in recovering from the effects of the violence. To the extent not already described in this definition, supportive services also include but are not limited to other services identified in FVPSA at 42 U.S.C. 10408(b)(1)(A)-(H). Supportive services may be directly provided by grantees and/or by providing advocacy or referrals to assist victims in accessing such services.

Underserved populations means populations who face barriers in accessing and using victim services, and includes populations underserved because of geographic location, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, underserved racial and ethnic populations, and populations underserved because of special needs including language barriers, disabilities, immigration status, and age. Individuals with criminal histories due to victimization and individuals with substance use disorders and mental health issues are also included in this definition. The reference to racial and ethnic populations is primarily directed toward racial and ethnic minority groups (as defined in section 1707(g) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 300(u-6)(g)), which means American Indians (including Alaska Natives, Eskimos, and Aleuts); Asian American; Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders; Blacks and Hispanics. The term “Hispanic” or “Latino” means individuals whose origin is Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or any other Spanish-speaking country. This underserved populations' definition also includes other population categories determined by the Secretary or the Secretary's designee to be underserved.

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§1370.3   What Government-wide and HHS-wide regulations apply to these programs?

(a) A number of government-wide and HHS regulations apply or potentially apply to all grantees. These include but are not limited to:

(1) 2 CFR part 182—Government-wide Requirements for Drug Free Workplaces;

(2) 2 CFR part 376—Nonprocurement Debarment and Suspension;

(3) 45 CFR part 16—Procedures of the Departmental Grant Appeals Board;

(4) 45 CFR part 30—Claims Collection;

(5) 45 CFR part 46—Protection of Human Subjects;

(6) 45 CFR part 75—Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements for HHS Awards

(7) 45 CFR part 80—Nondiscrimi-nation Under Programs Receiving Federal Assistance Through the Department of Health and Human Services Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964;

(8) 45 CFR part 81—Practice and Procedure for Hearings under part 80;

(9) 45 CFR part 84—Nondiscrimi-nation on the Basis of Handicap in Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance;

(10) 45 CFR part 86—Nondiscrimi-nation on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance;

(11) 45 CFR part 87—Equal Treatment for Faith-Based Organizations;

(12) 45 CFR part 91—Nondiscrimi-nation on the Basis of Age in Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance for HHS;

(13) 45 CFR part 92—Nondiscrimi-nation in Health Programs and Activities; and

(14) 45 CFR part 93—New Restrictions on Lobbying.

(b) A number of government-wide and HHS regulations apply to all contractors. These include but are not limited to:

(15) 48 CFR Chapter 1—Federal Acquisition Regulations; and

(16) 48 CFR Chapter 3—Federal Acquisition Regulations—Department of Health and Human Services.

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§1370.4   What confidentiality requirements apply to these programs?

(a) In order to ensure the safety of adult, youth, and child victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their families, grantees and subgrantees under FVPSA shall protect the confidentiality and privacy of such victims and their families. Subject to paragraphs (c), (d), and (e) of this section, grantees and subgrantees shall not—

(1) Disclose any personally identifying information (as defined in §1370.2) collected in connection with services requested (including services utilized or denied) through grantees' and subgrantees' programs;

(2) Reveal any personally identifying information without informed, written, reasonably time-limited consent by the person about whom information is sought, whether for this program or any other Federal, Tribal or State grant program, including but not limited to whether to comply with Federal, Tribal, or State reporting, evaluation, or data collection requirements; or

(3) Require an adult, youth, or child victim of family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence to provide a consent to release his or her personally identifying information as a condition of eligibility for the services provided by the grantee or subgrantee.

(b) Consent shall be given by the person, except in the case of an unemancipated minor it shall be given by both the minor and the minor's parent or guardian; or in the case of an individual with a guardian it shall be given by the individual's guardian. A parent or guardian may not give consent if: he or she is the abuser or suspected abuser of the minor or individual with a guardian; or, the abuser or suspected abuser of the other parent of the minor. If a minor or a person with a legally appointed guardian is permitted by law to receive services without the parent's or guardian's consent, the minor or person with a guardian may release information without additional consent. Reasonable accommodations shall also be made for those who may be unable, due to disability or other functional limitation, to provide consent in writing.

(c) If the release of information described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section is compelled by statutory or court mandate:

(1) Grantees and sub-grantees shall make reasonable attempts to provide notice to victims affected by the release of the information; and

(2) Grantees and subgrantees shall take steps necessary to protect the privacy and safety of the persons affected by the release of the information.

(d) Grantees and subgrantees may share:

(1) Non-personally identifying information, in the aggregate, regarding services to their clients and demographic non-personally identifying information in order to comply with Federal, State, or Tribal reporting, evaluation, or data collection requirements;

(2) Court-generated information and law enforcement-generated information contained in secure, governmental registries for protective order enforcement purposes; and

(3) Law enforcement- and prosecution-generated information necessary for law enforcement and prosecution purposes.

(4) Personally identifying information may be shared with a health care provider or payer, but only with the informed, written, reasonably time-limited consent of the person about whom such information is sought.

(e) Nothing in this section prohibits a grantee or subgrantee, where mandated or expressly permitted by the State or Indian Tribe, from reporting abuse and neglect, as those terms are defined by law, or from reporting imminent risk of serious bodily injury or death of the victim or another person.

(f) Nothing in this section shall be construed to supersede any provision of any Federal, State, Tribal, or local law that provides greater protection than this section for victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence.

(g) The address or location of any shelter facility assisted that maintains a confidential location shall, except with written authorization of the person or persons responsible for the operation of such shelter, not be made public.

(1) Shelters which choose to remain confidential pursuant to this rule must develop and maintain systems and protocols to remain secure, which must include policies to respond to disruptive or dangerous contact from abusers, and

(2) Tribal governments, while exercising due diligence to comply with statutory provisions and this rule, may determine how best to maintain the safety and confidentiality of shelter locations.

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§1370.5   What additional non-discrimination requirements apply to these programs?

(a) No person shall on the ground of actual or perceived sex, including gender identity, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under, any program or activity funded in whole or in part through FVPSA.

(1) FVPSA grantees and subgrantees must provide comparable services to victims regardless of actual or perceived sex, including gender identity. This includes not only providing access to services for all victims, including male victims, of family, domestic, and dating violence regardless of actual or perceived sex, including gender identity, but also making sure not to limit services for victims with adolescent children (under the age of 18) on the basis of the actual or perceived sex, including gender identity, of the children. Victims and their minor children must be sheltered or housed together, regardless of actual or perceived sex, including gender identity, unless requested otherwise or unless the factors or considerations identified in §1370.5(a)(2) require an exception to this general rule.

(2) No such program or activity is required to include an individual in such program or activity without taking into consideration that individual's sex in those certain instances where sex is a bona fide occupational qualification or a programmatic factor reasonably necessary to the essential operation of that particular program or activity. If sex segregation or sex-specific programming is essential to the normal or safe operation of the program, nothing in this paragraph shall prevent any such program or activity from consideration of an individual's sex. In such circumstances, grantees and subgrantees may meet the requirements of this paragraph by providing comparable services to individuals who cannot be provided with the sex-segregated or sex-specific programming, including access to a comparable length of stay, supportive services, and transportation as needed to access services. If a grantee or subgrantee determines that sex-segregated or sex-specific programming is essential for the normal or safe operation of the program, it must support its justification with an assessment of the facts and circumstances surrounding the specific program, including an analysis of factors discussed in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, and take into account established field-based best practices and research findings, as applicable. The justification cannot rely on unsupported assumptions or overly-broad sex-based generalizations. An individual must be treated consistent with their gender identity in accordance with this section.

(3) Factors that may be relevant to a grantee's or subgrantee's evaluation of whether sex-segregated or sex-specific programming is essential to the normal or safe operations of the program include, but are not limited, to the following: The nature of the service, the anticipated positive and negative consequences to all eligible beneficiaries of not providing the program in a sex-segregated or sex-specific manner, the literature on the efficacy of the service being sex-segregated or sex-specific, and whether similarly-situated grantees and subgrantees providing the same services have been successful in providing services effectively in a manner that is not sex-segregated or sex-specific. A grantee or subgrantee may not provide sex-segregated or sex-specific services for reasons that are trivial or based on the grantee's or subgrantee's convenience.

(4) As with all individuals served, transgender and gender nonconforming individuals must have equal access to FVPSA-funded shelter and nonresidential programs. Programmatic accessibility for transgender and gender nonconforming survivors and minor children must be afforded to meet individual needs consistent with the individual's gender identity. ACF requires that a FVPSA grantee or subgrantee that makes decisions about eligibility for or placement into single-sex emergency shelters or other facilities offer every individual an assignment consistent with their gender identity. For the purpose of assigning a service beneficiary to sex-segregated or sex-specific services, the grantee/subgrantee may ask a beneficiary which group or services the beneficiary wishes to join. The grantee/subgrantee may not, however, ask questions about the beneficiary's anatomy or medical history or make demands for identity documents or other documentation of gender. A victim's/beneficiary's or potential victim's/beneficiary's request for an alternative or additional accommodation for purposes of personal health, privacy, or safety must be given serious consideration in making the placement. For instance, if the potential victim/beneficiary requests to be placed based on his or her sex assigned at birth, ACF requires that the provider will place the individual in accordance with that request, consistent with health, safety, and privacy concerns of the individual. ACF also requires that a provider will not make an assignment or re-assignment of the transgender or gender nonconforming individual based on complaints of another person when the sole stated basis of the complaint is a victim/client or potential victim/client's non-conformance with gender stereotypes or sex, including gender identity.

(b) An organization that participates in programs funded through the FVPSA shall not, in providing services, discriminate against a program beneficiary or prospective program beneficiary on the basis of religion, a religious belief, a refusal to hold a religious belief, or a refusal to attend or participate in a religious practice.

(1) Dietary practices dictated by particular religious beliefs may require reasonable accommodation in cooking or feeding arrangements for particular beneficiaries as practicable. Additionally, other forms of religious practice may require reasonable accommodation including, but not limited to, shelters that have cleaning schedules may need to account for a survivor's religion which prohibits him/her from working on religious holidays.

(c) No person shall on the ground of actual or perceived sexual orientation be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under, any program or activity funded in whole or in part through FVPSA.

(1) All programs must take into account participants' needs and be inclusive and not stigmatize participants based on actual or perceived sexual orientation.

(d) All FVPSA-funded services must be provided without requiring documentation of immigration status because HHS has determined that FVPSA-funded services do not fall within the definition of federal public benefit that would require verification of immigration status.

(e) Grantees and subgrantees should create a plan to ensure effective communication and equal access, including:

(1) How to identify and communicate with individuals with Limited English Proficiency, and how to identify and properly use qualified interpretation and translation services, and taglines; and

(2) How to take appropriate steps to ensure that communications with applicants, participants, beneficiaries, members of the public, and companions with disabilities are as effective as communications with others; and furnish appropriate auxiliary aids and services where necessary to afford qualified individuals with disabilities, including applicants, participants, beneficiaries, and members of the public, an equal opportunity to participate in, and enjoy the benefits of, a service, program, or activity. Auxiliary aids and services include qualified interpreters and large print materials.

(f) Nothing in this section shall be construed to invalidate or limit the rights, remedies, procedures, or legal standards available to individuals under other applicable law.

(g) The Secretary shall enforce the provisions of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section in accordance with section 602 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d-1). Section 603 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d-2) shall apply with respect to any action taken by the Secretary to enforce this section.

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§1370.6   What requirements for reports and evaluations apply to these programs?

Each entity receiving a grant or contract under these programs shall submit a performance report to the Secretary at such time as required by the Secretary. Such performance report shall describe the activities that have been carried out, contain an evaluation of the effectiveness of such activities, and provide such additional information as the Secretary may require. Territorial governments which consolidate FVPSA funds with other HHS funds in a Consolidated Block Grant pursuant to 45 CFR part 97 are not required to submit annual FVPSA performance progress reports and programmatic assurances if FVPSA funds are not designated in the consolidation application for FVPSA purposes. If a territorial government either does not consolidate FVPSA funds with other HHS funds or does consolidate but indicates that FVPSA funds will be used for FVPSA purposes, the territorial government must submit an annual FVPSA performance progress report and programmatic assurances to FYSB.

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Subpart B—State and Indian Tribal Grants

§1370.10   What additional requirements apply to State and Indian Tribal grants?

(a) These grants assist States and Tribes to support the establishment, maintenance, and expansion of programs and projects to prevent incidents of family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence; to provide immediate shelter, supportive services, and access to community-based programs for victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their dependents; and to provide specialized services for children exposed to family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, including victims who are members of underserved populations. States must consult with and provide for the participation of State Domestic Violence Coalitions and Tribal Coalitions in the planning and monitoring of the distribution and administration of subgrant programs and projects. At a minimum to further FVPSA requirements, States and State Domestic Violence Coalitions will work together to determine grant priorities based upon jointly identified needs; to identify strategies to address needs; to define mutual expectations regarding programmatic performance and monitoring; and to implement an annual collaboration plan that incorporates concrete steps for accomplishing these tasks. If States also fund State Domestic Violence Coalitions to provide training, technical assistance, or other programming, nothing in this rule is intended to conflict with State contracting requirements regarding conflicts of interest but rather that this rule's requirements should be interpreted to complement States' contracting and procurement laws and regulations. States must involve community-based organizations that primarily serve underserved populations, including culturally- and linguistically-specific populations, to determine how such populations can assist the States in serving the unmet needs of underserved populations and culturally- and linguistically-specific populations. Tribes should be involved in these processes where appropriate, but this rule is not intended to encroach upon Tribal sovereignty. States also must consult with and provide for the participation of State Domestic Violence Coalitions and Tribal Coalitions in State planning and coordinate such planning with needs assessments to identify service gaps or problems and develop appropriate responsive plans and programs. Similar coordination and collaboration processes for Tribes and State Domestic Violence Coalitions are expected when feasible and appropriate with deference to Tribal sovereignty as previously indicated.

(b) A State application must be submitted by the Chief Executive of the State and signed by the Chief Executive Officer or the Chief Program Official designated as responsible for the administration of FVPSA. Each application must contain the following information or documentation:

(1) The name of the State agency, the name and contact information for the Chief Program Official designated as responsible for the administration of funds under FVPSA and coordination of related programs within the State, and the name and contact information for a contact person if different from the Chief Program Official;

(2) A plan describing in detail how the needs of underserved populations will be met, including:

(i) Identification of which populations in the State are underserved, a description of those that are being targeted for outreach and services, and a brief explanation of why those populations were selected to receive outreach and services, including how often the State revisits the identification and selection of the populations to be served with FVPSA funding. States must review their State demographics and other relevant metrics at least every three years or explain why this process is unnecessary;

(ii) A description of the outreach plan, including the domestic violence training to be provided, the means for providing technical assistance and support, and the leadership role played by those representing and serving the underserved populations in question;

(iii) A description of the specific services to be provided or enhanced, such as new shelters or services, improved access to shelters or services, or new services for underserved populations; and

(iv) A description of the public information component of the State's outreach program, including the elements of the program that are used to explain domestic violence, the most effective and safe ways to seek help, and tools to identify available resources; and

(v) A description of the means by which the program will provide meaningful access for limited English proficient individuals and effective communication for individuals with disabilities.

(3) A description of the process and procedures used to involve the State Domestic Violence Coalition and Tribal Coalition where one exists, knowledgeable individuals, and interested organizations, including those serving or representing underserved populations in the State planning process;

(4) Documentation of planning, consultation with and participation of the State Domestic Violence Coalition and Tribal Coalition where one exists, in the administration and distribution of FVPSA programs, projects, and grant funds awarded to the State;

(5) A description of the procedures used to assure an equitable distribution of grants and grant funds within the State and between urban and rural areas. States may use one of the Census definitions of rural or non-metro areas or another State-determined definition. A State-determined definition must be supported by data and be available for public input prior to its adoption. The State must show that the definition selected achieves an equitable distribution of funds within the State and between urban and rural areas. The plan should describe how funding processes and allocations will address the needs of underserved populations as defined in §1370.2, including Tribal populations, with an emphasis on funding organizations that can meet unique needs including culturally- and linguistically-specific populations. Other Federal, State, local, and private funds may be considered in determining compliance;

(6) A description of:

(i) how the State plans to use the grant funds including a State plan developed in consultation with State and Tribal Domestic Violence Coalitions and representatives of underserved populations;

(ii) the target populations;

(iii) the number of shelters and programs providing shelter to be funded;

(iv) the number of non-residential programs to be funded; the services the State will provide; and

(v) the expected results from the use of the grant funds. To fulfill these requirements, it is critically important that States work with State Domestic Violence Coalitions and Tribes to solicit their feedback on program effectiveness which may include recommendations such as establishing program standards and participating in program monitoring;

(7) An assurance that the State has a law or procedure to bar an abuser from a shared household or a household of the abused person, which may include eviction laws or procedures, where appropriate;

(8) An assurance that not less than 70 percent of the funds distributed by a State to sub-recipients shall be distributed to entities for the primary purpose of providing immediate shelter and supportive services to adult and youth victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their dependents, and that not less than 25 percent of the funds distributed by a State to subgrantees/recipients shall be distributed to entities for the purpose of providing supportive services and prevention services (these percentages may overlap with respect to supportive services but are not included in the 5 percent cap applicable to State administrative costs). In the distribution of funds, States will give special emphasis to the support of community-based projects of demonstrated effectiveness that are carried out by primary-purpose domestic violence providers. No grant shall be made under this section to an entity other than a State unless the entity agrees that, with respect to the costs to be incurred by the entity in carrying out the program or project for which the grant is awarded, the entity will make available (directly or through donations from public or private entities) non-Federal contributions in an amount that is not less than $1 for every $5 of Federal funds provided under the grant. The non-Federal contributions required under this paragraph may be in cash or in kind;

(9) Documentation of policies, procedures and protocols that ensure individual identifiers of client records will not be used when providing statistical data on program activities and program services or in the course of grant monitoring, that the confidentiality of records pertaining to any individual provided family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence prevention or intervention services by any program or entity supported under the FVPSA will be strictly maintained, and the address or location of any shelter supported under the FVPSA will not be made public without the written authorization of the person or persons responsible for the operation of such shelter;

(10) Such additional agreements, assurances, and information, in such form, and submitted in such manner as the Funding Opportunity Announcement and related program guidance prescribe. Moreover, additional agreements, assurances, and information required by the Funding Opportunity Announcement and other program guidance will include that no requirement for participating in supportive services offered by FVPSA-funded programs may be imposed by grantees or subgrantees for the receipt of emergency shelter and receipt of all supportive services shall be voluntary. Similarly, the receipt of shelter cannot be conditioned on participation in other services, such as, but not limited to counseling, parenting classes, mental health or substance use disorders treatment, pursuit of specific legal remedies, or life skill classes. Additionally, programs cannot impose conditions for admission to shelter by applying inappropriate screening mechanisms, such as criminal background checks, sobriety requirements, requirements to obtain specific legal remedies, or mental health or substance use disorder screenings. An individual's or family's stay in shelter cannot be conditioned upon accepting or participating in services. Based upon the capacity of a FVPSA-funded service provider, victims and their dependents do not need to reside in shelter to receive supportive services. Nothing is these requirements prohibits a shelter operator from adopting reasonable policies and procedures reflecting field-based best practices, to ensure that persons receiving services are not currently engaging in illegal drug use, if that drug use presents a danger to the safety of others, creates an undue hardship for the shelter operator, or causes a fundamental alteration to the operator's services. In the case of an apparent conflict with State, Federal, or Tribal laws, case-by-case determinations will be made by ACF if they are not resolved at the State or Tribal level. In general, when two or more laws apply, a grantee/subgrantee must meet the highest standard for providing programmatic accessibility to victims and their dependents. These provisions are not intended to deny a shelter the ability to manage its services and secure the safety of all shelter residents should, for example, a client become violent or abusive to other clients.

(c) An application from a Tribe or Tribal Organization must include documentation demonstrating that the governing body of the organization on whose behalf the application is submitted approves the application's submission to ACF for the current FVPSA grant period. Each application must contain the following information or documentation:

(1) Written Tribal resolutions, meeting minutes from the governing body, and/or letters from the authorizing official reflecting approval of the application's submittal, depending on what is appropriate for the applicant's governance structure. Such documentation must reflect the applicant's authority to submit the application on behalf of members of the Tribes and administer programs and activities pursuant to FVPSA;

(2) The resolution or equivalent documentation must specify the name(s) of the Tribe(s) on whose behalf the application is submitted and the service areas for the intended grant services;

(3) Applications from consortia must provide letters of commitment, memoranda of understanding, or their equivalent identifying the primary applicant that is responsible for administering the grant, documenting commitments made by partnering eligible applicants, and describing their roles and responsibilities as partners in the consortia or collaboration;

(4) A description of the procedures designed to involve knowledgeable individuals and interested organizations in providing services under the FVPSA. For example, knowledgeable individuals and interested organizations may include Tribal officials or social services staff involved in child abuse or family violence prevention, Tribal law enforcement officials, representatives of Tribal or State Domestic Violence Coalitions, and operators of domestic violence shelters and service programs;

(5) A description of the applicant's operation of and/or capacity to carry out a family violence prevention and services program. This might be demonstrated in ways such as:

(i) The current operation of a shelter, safe house, or domestic violence prevention program;

(ii) The establishment of joint or collaborative service agreements with a local public agency or a private, non- profit agency for the operation of family violence prevention and intervention activities or services; or

(iii) The operation of social services programs as evidenced by receipt of grants or contracts awarded under Indian Child Welfare grants from the Bureau of Indian Affairs; Child Welfare Services grants under Title IV-B of the Social Security Act; or Family Preservation and Family Support grants under Title IV-B of the Social Security Act.

(6) A description of the services to be provided, how the applicant organization plans to use the grant funds to provide the direct services, to whom the services will be provided, and the expected results of the services;

(7) An assurance that the Indian Tribe has a law or procedure to bar an abuser from a shared household or a household of the abused person, which may include eviction laws or procedures, where appropriate;

(8) Documentation of the policies and procedures developed and implemented, including copies of the policies and procedures, to ensure that individual identifiers of client records will not be used when providing statistical data on program activities and program services or in the course of grant monitoring and that the confidentiality of records pertaining to any individual provided domestic violence prevention or intervention services by any FVPSA-supported program will be strictly maintained; and

(9) Such agreements, assurances, and information, in such form, and submitted in such manner as the Funding Opportunity Announcement and related program guidance prescribe.

(d) Given the unique needs of victims of trafficking, FVPSA-funded programs are strongly encouraged to safely screen for and identify victims of human trafficking who are also victims or survivors of domestic violence or dating violence and provide services that support their unique needs.

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Subpart C—State Domestic Violence Coalition Grants

§1370.20   What additional requirements apply to State Domestic Violence Coalitions?

(a) State Domestic Violence Coalitions reflect a Federal commitment to reducing domestic violence; to urge States, localities, cities, and the private sector to improve the responses to and the prevention of domestic violence and encourage stakeholders and service providers to plan toward an integrated service delivery approach that meets the needs of all victims, including those in underserved communities; to provide for technical assistance and training relating to domestic violence programs; and to increase public awareness about and prevention of domestic violence and increase the quality and availability of shelter and supportive services for victims of domestic violence and their dependents.

(b) To be eligible to receive a grant under this section, an organization shall be a Statewide, non-governmental, non-profit 501(c)(3) domestic violence coalition, designated as such by the Department. To obtain this designation the organization must meet the following criteria:

(1) The membership must include representatives from a majority of the primary-purpose domestic violence service providers operating within the State (a Coalition also may include representatives of Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations as defined in the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act);

(2) The Board membership of the Coalition must be representative of such programs, and may include representatives of communities in which the services are being provided in the State;

(3) Financial sustainability of State Domestic Violence Coalitions, as independent, autonomous non-profit organizations, also must be supported by their membership, including those member representatives on the Coalitions' Boards of Directors;

(4) The purpose of a State Domestic Violence Coalition is to provide education, support, and technical assistance to such service providers to enable the providers to establish and maintain shelter and supportive services for victims of domestic violence and their dependents; and to serve as an information clearinghouse, primary point of contact, and resource center on domestic violence for the State; and support the development of polices, protocols, and procedures to enhance domestic violence intervention and prevention in the State.

(c) To apply for a grant under this section, an organization shall submit an annual application that:

(1) Includes a complete description of the applicant's plan for the operation of a State Domestic Violence Coalition, including documentation that the Coalition's work will demonstrate the capacity to support state-wide efforts to improve system responses to domestic and dating violence as outlined in (c)(1)(i) through (vii) of this section. Coalitions must also have documented experience in administering Federal grants to conduct the activities of a Coalition or a documented history of active participation in:

(i) Working with local family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence service programs and providers of direct services to encourage appropriate and comprehensive responses to family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence against adults or youth within the State involved, including providing training and technical assistance and conducting State needs assessments and participate in planning and monitoring of the distribution of subgrants within the States and in the administration of grant programs and projects;

(ii) In conducting needs assessments, Coalitions and States must work in partnership on the statutorily required FVPSA State planning process to involve representatives from underserved populations and culturally- and linguistically-specific populations to plan, assess and voice the needs of the communities they represent. Coalitions will assist States in identifying underserved populations and culturally- and linguistically- specific community based organizations in State planning and to work with States to unify planning and needs assessment efforts so that comprehensive and culturally-specific services are provided. The inclusion of the populations targeted will emphasize building the capacity of culturally- and linguistically-specific services and programs.

(iii) Working in collaboration with service providers and community-based organizations to address the needs of family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence victims, and their dependents, who are members of underserved populations and culturally- and linguistically-specific populations;

(iv) Collaborating with and providing information to entities in such fields as housing, health care, mental health, social welfare, or business to support the development and implementation of effective policies, protocols, and programs that address the safety and support needs of adult and youth victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence;

(v) Encouraging appropriate responses to cases of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence against adults or youth, including by working with judicial and law enforcement agencies;

(vi) Working with family law judges, criminal court judges, child protective service agencies, and children's advocates to develop appropriate responses to child custody and visitation issues in cases of child exposure to family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence and in cases in which family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence is present and child abuse is present;

(vii) Providing information to the public about prevention of family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence, including information targeted to underserved populations, including limited English proficient individuals; and

(viii) Collaborating with Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations (and corresponding Native Hawaiian groups or communities) to address the needs of Indian (including Alaska Native) and Native Hawaiian victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, as applicable in the State;

(2) Contains such agreements, assurances, and information, in such form, and submitted in such manner as the Funding Opportunity Announcement and related program guidance prescribe.

(d) Nothing in this section limits the ability of a Coalition to use non-Federal or other Federal funding sources to conduct required functions, provided that if the Coalition uses funds received under section 2001(c)(1) of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 to perform the functions described in FVPSA at 42 U.S.C. 10411(e) in lieu of funds provided under the FVPSA, it shall provide an annual assurance to the Secretary that it is using such funds, and that it is coordinating the activities conducted under this section with those of the State's activities under Part T of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968.

(e) In cases in which two or more organizations seek designation, the designation of each State's individual Coalition is within the exclusive discretion of HHS. HHS will determine which applicant best fits statutory criteria, with particular attention paid to the applicant's documented history of effective work, support of primary-purpose domestic violence service providers and programs that serve underserved populations, coordination and collaboration with the State government, and capacity to accomplish the FVPSA-mandated role of a Coalition.

(f) Regarding FVPSA funding, in cases where a Coalition financially or otherwise dissolves, is newly formed, or merges with another entity, the designation of a new Coalition is within the exclusive discretion of HHS. HHS will seek individual feedback from domestic violence service providers, community stakeholders, State leaders, and representatives of underserved populations and culturally- and linguistically-specific populations to identify an existing organization that can serve as the Coalition or to develop a new organization. The new Coalition must reapply for designation and funding following steps determined by the Secretary. HHS will determine whether the applicant fits the statutory criteria, with particular attention paid to the applicant's documented history of effective work, support of primary-purpose domestic violence programs and programs that serve underserved populations, coordination and collaboration with the State government, and capacity to accomplish the FVPSA mandated role of a Coalition.

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Subpart D—Discretionary Grants and Contracts

§1370.30   What National Resource Center and Training and Technical Assistance grant programs are available and what additional requirements apply?

(a) These grants are to provide resource information, training, and technical assistance to improve the capacity of individuals, organizations, governmental entities, and communities to prevent family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence and to provide effective intervention services. They fund national, special issue, and culturally-specific resource centers addressing key areas of domestic violence intervention and prevention, and may include State resource centers to reduce disparities in domestic violence in States with high proportions of Native American (including Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian) populations and to support training and technical assistance that address emerging issues related to family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, to entities demonstrating expertise in these areas. Grants may be made for:

(1) A National Resource Center on Domestic Violence which will conduct the following activities:

(i) offer a comprehensive array of technical assistance and training resources to Federal, State, and local governmental agencies, domestic violence service providers, community-based organizations, and other professionals and interested parties, related to domestic violence service programs and research, including programs and research related to victims and their children who are exposed to domestic violence; and

(ii) Maintain a central resource library in order to collect, prepare, analyze, and disseminate information and statistics related to the incidence and prevention of family violence and domestic violence; and the provision of shelter, supportive services, and prevention services to adult and youth victims of domestic violence (including services to prevent repeated incidents of violence).

(2) A National Indian Resource Center Addressing Domestic Violence and Safety for Indian Women which will conduct the following activities:

(i) Offer a comprehensive array of technical assistance and training resources to Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations, specifically designed to enhance the capacity of the Tribes and Tribal organizations to respond to domestic violence and increase the safety of Indian women; and

(ii) Enhance the intervention and prevention efforts of Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations to respond to domestic violence and increase the safety of Indian women, and

(iii) To coordinate activities with other Federal agencies, offices, and grantees that address the needs of Indians (including Alaska Natives) and Native Hawaiians that experience domestic violence.

(3) Special issue resource centers to provide national information, training, and technical assistance to State and local domestic violence service providers. Each special issue resource center shall focus on enhancing domestic violence intervention and prevention efforts in at least one of the following areas:

(i) Response of the criminal and civil justice systems to domestic violence victims, which may include the response to the use of the self-defense plea by domestic violence victims and the issuance and use of protective orders;

(ii) Response of child protective service agencies to victims of domestic violence and their dependents and child custody issues in domestic violence cases;

(iii) Response of the interdisciplinary health care system to victims of domestic violence and access to health care resources for victims of domestic violence; and

(iv) Response of mental health systems, domestic violence service programs, and other related systems and programs to victims of domestic violence and to their children who are exposed to domestic violence.

(4) Culturally-Specific Special Issue Resource Centers enhance domestic violence intervention and prevention efforts for victims of domestic violence who are members of racial and ethnic minority groups, to enhance the cultural and linguistic relevancy of service delivery, resource utilization, policy, research, technical assistance, community education, and prevention initiatives.

(5) State resource centers to provide Statewide information, training, and technical assistance to Indian Tribes, Tribal organizations, and local domestic violence service organizations serving Native Americans (including Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians) in a culturally sensitive and relevant manner. These centers shall:

(i) Offer a comprehensive array of technical assistance and training resources to Indian Tribes, Tribal organizations, and providers of services to Native Americans (including Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians) specifically designed to enhance the capacity of the Tribes, organizations, and providers to respond to domestic violence, including offering the resources in States in which the population of Indians (including Alaska Natives) or Native Hawaiians exceeds 2.5 percent of the total population of the State;

(ii) Coordinate all projects and activities with the National Indian Resource Center Addressing Domestic Violence and Safety for Indian Women, including projects and activities that involve working with State and local governments to enhance their capacity to understand the unique needs of Native Americans (including Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians); and

(iii) Provide comprehensive community education and domestic violence prevention initiatives in a culturally sensitive and relevant manner; and

(iv) Otherwise meet certain eligibility requirements for state resource centers to reduce tribal disparities, pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 10410(c)(4).

(6) Other discretionary purposes to support training and technical assistance that address emerging issues related to family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, to entities demonstrating related experience.

(b) To receive a grant under any part of this section, an entity shall submit an application that shall meet such eligibility standards as are prescribed in the FVPSA and contains such agreements, assurances, and information, in such form, and submitted in such manner as the Funding Opportunity Announcement and related program guidance prescribe.

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§1370.31   What additional requirements apply to grants for specialized services for abused parents and their children?

(a) These grants serve to expand the capacity of family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence service programs and community-based programs to prevent future domestic violence by addressing, in an appropriate manner, the needs of children exposed to family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence. To be eligible an entity must be a local agency, a nonprofit private organization (including faith-based and charitable organizations, community-based organizations, and voluntary associations), or a Tribal organization, with a demonstrated record of serving victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence and their children.

(b) To be eligible to receive a grant under this section, an entity shall submit an application that:

(1) Includes a complete description of the applicant's plan for providing specialized services for abused parents and their children, including descriptions of:

(i) How the entity will prioritize the safety of, and confidentiality of, information about victims of family violence, victims of domestic violence, and victims of dating violence and their children, and will comply with the confidentiality requirements of FVPSA, 42 U.S.C. 10406(c)(5) and this rule at §1370.4;

(ii) How the entity will provide developmentally appropriate and age-appropriate services, and culturally and linguistically appropriate services, to the victims and children;

(iii) How the entity will ensure that professionals working with the children receive the training and technical assistance appropriate and relevant to the unique needs of children exposed to family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence; and

(iv) How, in the case of victims who choose to or by virtue of their circumstances must remain in contact with an abusive partner/parent, the entity will: consider the victim's decision-making for keeping children safe within the continuum of domestic violence (see the definition of domestic violence in the regulatory text at §1370.2 which describes the potential range of behaviors constituting domestic violence); not place burdens or demands on the non-abusive parent that the parent cannot comply with due to the coercive control of the offender; and take precautions to avoid actions that discourage victims from help-seeking, such as making unnecessary referrals to child protective services when survivors go to community-based organizations for assistance in safety planning to protect children.

(2) Demonstrates that the applicant has the ability to effectively provide, or partner with an organization that provides, direct counseling, appropriate services, and advocacy on behalf of victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, and their children, including coordination with services provided by the child welfare system, schools, health care providers, home visitors, family court systems, and any other child or youth serving system;

(3) Demonstrates that the applicant can effectively provide services for non-abusing parents to support those parents' roles as caregivers and their roles in responding to the social, emotional, and developmental needs of their children; and

(4) Contains such agreements, assurances, and information, in such form, and submitted in such manner as the Funding Opportunity Announcement and related program guidance prescribe.

(c) Eligible applicants may use funds under a grant pursuant to this section:

(1) To provide early childhood development and mental health services;

(2) To coordinate activities with and provide technical assistance to community-based organizations serving victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence or children exposed to family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence; and

(3) To provide additional services and referrals to services for children, including child care, transportation, educational support, respite care, supervised visitation, or other necessary services.

(d) If Congressional appropriations in any fiscal year for the entirety of programs covered in this part (exclusive of the National Domestic Violence Hotline which receives a separate appropriation) exceed $130 million, not less than 25 percent of such excess funds shall be made available to carry out this grant program. If appropriations reach this threshold, HHS will specify funding levels in future Funding Opportunity Announcements.

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§1370.32   What additional requirements apply to National Domestic Violence Hotline grants?

(a) These grants are for one or more private entities to provide for the ongoing operation of a 24-hour, national, toll-free telephone hotline to provide information and assistance to adult and youth victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, family and household members of such victims, and persons affected by the victimization.

(b) Telephone is defined as a communications device that permits two or more callers or users to engage in transmitted analog, digital, short message service (SMS), cellular/wireless, laser, cable/broadband, internet, voice-over internet protocol (IP), video, or other communications, including telephone, smartphone, chat, text, voice recognition, or other technological means which connects callers or users together.

(c) To be eligible to receive a grant under this section, an entity shall submit an application that:

(1) Includes a complete description of the applicant's plan for the operation of a national domestic violence telephone hotline, including descriptions of:

(i) The training program for hotline personnel, including technology training to ensure that all persons affiliated with the hotline are able to effectively operate any technological systems used by the hotline, and are familiar with effective communication and equal access requirements, to ensure access for all, including people who are Limited English Proficient and people with disabilities;

(ii) The hiring criteria and qualifications for hotline personnel;

(iii) The methods for the creation, maintenance, and updating of a resource database;

(iv) A plan for publicizing the availability of the hotline;

(v) A plan for providing service such as advocacy and supportive services to Limited English Proficient callers, including service through hotline personnel who are qualified to interpret in non-English languages;

(vi) A plan for facilitating access to the hotline by persons with disabilities, including persons who are deaf or have hearing impairments; and

(vii) A plan for providing assistance and referrals to youth victims of domestic violence and for victims of dating violence who are minors, which may be carried out through a national teen dating violence hotline.

(2) Demonstrates that the applicant has recognized expertise in the area of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence and a record of high quality service to victims of family violence, domestic violence, or dating violence, including a demonstration of support from advocacy groups and State Domestic violence Coalitions;

(3) Demonstrates that the applicant has the capacity and the expertise to maintain a domestic violence hotline and a comprehensive database of service providers;

(4) Demonstrates the ability to provide information and referrals for callers, directly connect callers to service providers, and employ crisis interventions meeting the standards of family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence providers;

(5) Demonstrates that the applicant has a commitment to diversity and to the provision of services to underserved populations, including to ethnic, racial, and Limited English Proficient individuals, in addition to older individuals and individuals with disabilities;

(6) Demonstrates that the applicant follows comprehensive quality assurance practices; and

(7) Contains such agreements, information, and assurances, including nondisclosure of confidential or private information, in such form, and submitted in such manner as the Funding Opportunity Announcement and related program guidance prescribe.

(d) The entity receiving a grant under this section shall submit a performance report to the Secretary at such time as reasonably required by the Secretary that shall describe the activities that have been carried out with grant funds, contain an evaluation of the effectiveness of such activities, and provide additional information as the Secretary may reasonably require.

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