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Title 45 Part 1357

Title 45 → Subtitle B → Chapter XIII → Subchapter G → Part 1357

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 45 Part 1357

e-CFR data is current as of June 21, 2018

Title 45Subtitle BChapter XIIISubchapter G → Part 1357


Title 45: Public Welfare


§1357.10   Scope and definitions.

(a) Scope. This part applies to State and Indian Tribal programs for child welfare services under subpart 1, and family preservation and family support services under subpart 2 of title IV-B of the Act.

(b) Eligibility. Child and family services under title IV-B, subparts 1 and 2, must be available on the basis of need for services and must not be denied on the basis of income or length of residence in the State or within the Indian Tribe's jurisdiction.

(c) Definitions.

Child and Family Services Plan (CFSP) means the document, developed through joint planning, which describes the publicly-funded State child and family services continuum (family support and family preservation services; child welfare services, including child abuse and neglect prevention, intervention, and treatment services; services to support reunification, adoption, kinship care, foster care, independent living, or other permanent living arrangements). For Indian Tribes, the document describes the child welfare and/or family preservation and support services to be provided by the Indian Tribe; includes goals and objectives both for improved outcomes for the safety, permanency and well-being of children and families and for service delivery system reform; specifies the services and other implementation activities that will be undertaken to carry out the goals and objectives; and includes plans for program improvement and allocation of resources.

Child welfare services means public social services directed to accomplish the following purposes:

(1) Protecting and promoting the welfare and safety of all children, including individuals with disabilities; homeless, dependent, or neglected children;

(2) Preventing or remedying, or assisting in the solution of problems which may result in the neglect, abuse, exploitation, or delinquency of children;

(3) Preventing the unnecessary separation of children from their families by identifying family problems and assisting families in resolving their problems and preventing the breakup of the family where the prevention of child removal is desirable and possible;

(4) Restoring to their families children who have been removed and may be safely returned, by the provision of services to the child and the family;

(5) Assuring adequate care of children away from their homes, in cases where the child cannot be returned home or cannot be placed for adoption; and

(6) Placing children in suitable adoptive homes, in cases where restoration to the biological family is not possible or appropriate.

Children refers to individuals from birth to the age of 21 (or such age of majority as provided under State law) including infants, children, youth, adolescents, and young adults.

Community-based services refers to programs delivered in accessible settings in the community and responsive to the needs of the community and the individuals and families residing therein. These services may be provided under public or private nonprofit auspices.

Families includes, but is not limited to, biological, adoptive, foster, and extended families.

Family preservation services refers to services for children and families designed to protect children from harm and help families (including foster, adoptive, and extended families) at risk or in crisis, including—

(1) Preplacement preventive services programs, such as intensive family preservation programs, designed to help children at risk of foster care placement remain with their families, where possible;

(2) Service programs designed to help children, where appropriate, return to families from which they have been removed; or be placed for adoption, with a legal guardian, or, if adoption or legal guardianship is determined not to be appropriate for a child, in some other planned, permanent living arrangement;

(3) Service programs designed to provide follow-up care to families to whom a child has been returned after a foster care placement;

(4) Respite care of children to provide temporary relief for parents and other caregivers (including foster parents);

(5) Services designed to improve parenting skills (by reinforcing parents' confidence in their strengths, and helping them to identify where improvement is needed and to obtain assistance in improving those skills) with respect to matters such as child development, family budgeting, coping with stress, health, and nutrition; and

(6) Case management services designed to stabilize families in crisis such as transportation, assistance with housing and utility payments, and access to adequate health care.

Family support services means community-based services to promote the well-being of children and families designed to increase the strength and stability of families (including adoptive, foster, and extended families), to increase parents' confidence and competence in their parenting abilities, to afford children a stable and supportive family environment, and otherwise to enhance child development. Family support services may include:

(1) Services, including in-home visits, parent support groups, and other programs designed to improve parenting skills (by reinforcing parents' confidence in their strengths, and helping them to identify where improvement is needed and to obtain assistance in improving those skills) with respect to matters such as child development, family budgeting, coping with stress, health, and nutrition;

(2) Respite care of children to provide temporary relief for parents and other caregivers;

(3) Structured activities involving parents and children to strengthen the parent-child relationship;

(4) Drop-in centers to afford families opportunities for informal interaction with other families and with program staff;

(5) Transportation, information and referral services to afford families access to other community services, including child care, health care, nutrition programs, adult education literacy programs, legal services, and counseling and mentoring services; and

(6) Early developmental screening of children to assess the needs of such children, and assistance to families in securing specific services to meet these needs.

Joint planning means an ongoing partnership process between ACF and the State and between ACF and an Indian Tribe in the development, review, analysis, and refinement and/or revision of the State's and the Indian Tribe's child and family services plan. Joint planning involves discussions, consultation, and negotiation between ACF and the State or Indian Tribe in all areas of CFSP creation such as, but not limited to, identifying the service needs of children, youth, and families; selecting the unmet service needs that will be addressed; developing goals and objectives that will result in improving outcomes for children and families; developing a plan to meet the matching requirements; and establishing a more comprehensive, coordinated and effective child and family services delivery system. The expectation of joint planning is that both ACF and the State or Indian Tribe will reach agreement on substantive and procedural matters related to the CFSP.

[61 FR 58655, Nov. 18, 1996]

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§1357.15   Comprehensive child and family services plan requirements.

(a) Scope. (1) The CFSP provides an opportunity to lay the groundwork for a system of coordinated, integrated, culturally relevant family focused services. This section describes the requirements for the development, implementation and phase-in of the five-year comprehensive child and family services plan (CFSP). The State's CFSP must meet the requirements of both of the following programs. The Indian Tribe's CFSP must meet the requirements of one or both of the following programs depending on the Tribe's eligibility:

(i) Child welfare services under title IV-B, subpart 1; and

(ii) Family preservation and family support services under title IV-B, subpart 2.

(2) For States only, the CFSP also must contain information on the following programs:

(i) The independent living program under title IV-E, section 477 of the Act; and

(ii) The Child Abuse and Neglect State grant program (known as the Basic State Grant) under the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) (42 U.S.C. 5101 et. seq.).

(3) States must meet all requirements of this section except those that apply only to Indian Tribes. Indian Tribes must meet the requirements of this section only as specified.

(4) States and eligible Indian Tribes have the option to phase-in the requirements for a consolidated CFSP. The consolidated CFSP requirements must be in place by June 30, 1997 and meet the requirements of 45 CFR 1357.16.

(b) Eligibility for funds. (1) In order to receive funding under title IV-B, subparts 1 and 2, each State and eligible Indian Tribe must submit and have approved a consolidated, five-year Child and Family Services Plan (CFSP) and a CFS-101, Budget Request and Estimated Expenditure Report that meets the requirements under 45 CFR 1357.16.

(2) States and Indian Tribes that are consolidating the requirements for a CFSP in FY 1995, in accordance with §1357.15(a), must submit the CFSP and a CFS-101 for FY 1995 and 1996 by June 30, 1995.

(3) States and eligible Indian Tribes choosing to phase-in the requirements for a consolidated CFSP in FY 1996 and 1997 must submit the CFSP, the CFS-101 for FY 1995 for subpart 1 and 2, and the CFS-101 for subpart 2 for FY 1996 by June 30, 1995.

(4) The CFSP will be approved only if the plan was developed jointly by ACF and the State (or the Indian Tribe), and only after broad consultation by the State (and the Indian Tribe) with a wide range of appropriate public and non-profit private agencies and community-based organizations with experience in administering programs of services for children and families (including family preservation and support services).

(5) By June 30, 1996, each grantee must submit and have approved the first Annual Progress and Services Report and a CFS 101 for FY 1997 that meets the statutory and regulatory requirements of title IV-B, subparts 1 and 2.

(6) The Annual Progress and Services Report will be approved if it was developed jointly by ACF and the State (or the Indian Tribe) and if it meets the requirements of 45 CFR 1357.16.

(7) The five-year CFSP for FYs 1995-1999 may be submitted in the format of the State's or the Indian Tribe's choice and must be submitted no later than June 30, 1995, to the appropriate ACF Regional Office.

(c) Assurances. The following assurances will remain in effect on an ongoing basis and will need to be re-submitted only if a significant change in the State or the Indian Tribe's program affects an assurance:

(1) The State or Indian Tribe must assure that it will participate in any evaluations the Secretary of HHS may require.

(2) The State or Indian Tribe must assure that it will administer the CFSP in accordance with methods determined by the Secretary to be proper and efficient.

(3) The State or Indian Tribe must assure that it has a plan for the training and use of paid paraprofessional staff, with particular emphasis on the full-time or part-time employment of low-income persons, as community service aides; and a plan for the use of nonpaid or partially paid volunteers in providing services and in assisting any advisory committees established by the State or Tribe.

(4) The State or Indian Tribe must assure that standards and requirements imposed with respect to child care under title XX shall apply with respect to day care services, if provided under the CFSP, except insofar as eligibility for such services is involved.

(d) The child and family services plan (CFSP): general. The State and the Indian Tribe must base the development of the CFSP on a planning process that includes:

(1) broad involvement and consultation with a wide range of appropriate public and non-profit private agencies and community-based organizations, parents, including parents who are involved or have experience with the child welfare system, and others;

(2) coordination of the provision of services under the plan with other Federal and federally assisted programs serving children and families, including youth and adolescents; and

(3) collection of existing or available information to help determine vulnerable or at-risk populations or target areas; assess service needs and resources; identify gaps in services; select priorities for targeting funding and services; formulate goals and objectives; and develop opportunities for bringing about more effective and accessible services for children and families.

(e) State agency administering the programs. (1) The State's CFSP must identify the name of the State agency that will administer the title IV-B programs under the plan. Except as provided by statute, the same agency is required to administer or supervise the administration of all programs under titles IV-B and IV-E of the Act and the social services block grant program under title XX of the Act. (See the definition of “State agency” in 45 CFR 1355.20.)

(2) The CFSP must include a description of the organization and function of the State agency and organizational charts as appropriate. It also must identify the organizational unit(s) within the State agency responsible for the operation and administration of the CFSP, and include a description of the unit's organization and function and a copy of the organizational chart(s).

(f) Indian Tribal organization administering the program(s). (1) The Indian Tribe's CFSP must provide the name of the Indian Tribal organization (ITO) designated to administer funds under title IV-B, subpart 1, child welfare services and/or under subpart 2, family preservation and family support services. If the Indian Tribe receives funds under both subparts, the same agency or organization must administer both programs.

(2) The Indian Tribe's CFSP must include a description of the organization and function of the office responsible for the operation and administration of the CFSP, an organizational chart of that office, and a description of how that office relates to Tribal and other offices operating or administering services programs within the Indian Tribe's service area (e.g., Indian Health Service.)

(g) Vision Statement. The CFSP must include a vision statement which articulates the grantee's philosophy in providing child and family services and developing or improving a coordinated service delivery system. The vision should reflect the service principles at section 1355.25.

(h) Goals. The CFSP must specify the goals, based on the vision statement, that will be accomplished during and by the end of the five-year period of the plan. The goals must be expressed in terms of improved outcomes for and the safety, permanency and well-being of children and families, and in terms of a more comprehensive, coordinated, and effective child and family service delivery system.

(i) Objectives. (1) The CFSP must include the realistic, specific, quantifiable and measurable objectives that will be undertaken to achieve each goal. Each objective should focus on outcomes for children, youth, and/or their families or on elements of service delivery (such as quality) that are linked to outcomes in important ways. Each objective should include both interim benchmarks and a long-term timetable, as appropriate, for achieving the objective.

(2) For States and Indian Tribes administering the title IV-B, subpart 1 program, the CFSP must include objectives to make progress in covering additional political subdivisions, reaching additional children in need of services, expanding and strengthening the range of existing services, and developing new types of services.

(j) Measures of progress. The CFSP must describe the methods to be used in measuring the results, accomplishments, and annual progress toward meeting the goals and objectives, especially the outcomes for children, youth, and families. Processes and procedures assuring the production of valid and reliable data and information must be specified. The data and information must be capable of determining whether or not the interim benchmarks and multiyear timetable for accomplishing CFSP goals and objectives are being met.

(k) Baseline information. (1) For FY 1995, the State and the Indian Tribe must base the development of the CFSP vision, goals, objectives, and funding and service decisions on an analysis of available baseline information and any trends over time on indicators in the following areas: the well-being of children and families; the needs of children and families; the nature, scope, and adequacy of existing child and family and related social services. Additional and updated information on service needs and organizational capacities must be obtained throughout the five-year period to measure progress in accomplishing the goals and objectives cited in the CFSP. A description of how this process will continue to be carried out must be included in the CFSP, and any revisions should be provided in the Annual Progress and Services Report.

(2) The State must collect and analyze State-wide information on family preservation and family support services currently available to families and children, including the nature and scope of existing public and privately funded family support and family preservation services; the extent to which each service is available and being provided in different geographic areas and to different types of families; and important gaps in service, including mismatches between available services and family needs as identified through baseline data and the consultation process. Other services which impact on the ability to preserve and support families may be included in the assessment. The Indian Tribe must collect and analyze information on family preservation and family support services currently available within their service delivery area including the information in this paragraph as appropriate. An Indian Tribe may submit documentation prepared to satisfy the requirements of other Federal child welfare grants, or contracts (such as the section 638 reporting form), along with a descriptive addendum addressing specifically the family preservation and family support services available.

(3) The CFSP must include a summary of the information used in developing the plan; an explanation of how this information and analysis were used in developing the goals, objectives, and funding and service decisions, including decisions about geographic targeting and service mix; a description of how information will be used to measure progress over the five-year period; and how this information will be used to facilitate the coordination of services.

(l) Consultation. (1) The State's CFSP must describe the internal and external consultation process used to obtain broad and active involvement of major actors across the entire spectrum of the child and family service delivery system in the development of the plan. The description should explain how this process was coordinated with or was a part of other planning processes in the State; how it led or will lead to improved coordination of services.

(2) The Indian Tribe's CFSP must describe the consultation process appropriate to its needs and circumstances used to obtain the active involvement of major actors providing child and family services within the Tribe's area of jurisdiction.

(3) For States and Indian Tribes, the consultation process must involve:

(i) All appropriate offices and agencies within the State agency or within the Indian Tribal service delivery system (e.g., child protective services (CPS), foster care and adoption, the social services block grant, reunification services, independent living, and other services to youth;)

(ii) In a State-supervised, county-administered State, county social services and/or child welfare directors or representatives of the county social services/child welfare administrators' association;

(iii) A wide array of State, local, Tribal, and community-based agencies and organizations, both public and private nonprofit with experience in administering programs of services for infants, children, youth, adolescents, and families, including family preservation and family support services;

(iv) Parents, including birth and adoptive parents, foster parents, families with a member with a disability, children both in and outside the child welfare system, and consumers of services from diverse groups;

(v) For States, representatives of Indian Tribes within the State;

(vi) For States, representatives of local government (e.g., counties, cities, and other communities, neighborhoods, or areas where needs for services are great;)

(vii) Representatives of professional and advocacy organizations (including, for example foundations and national resource centers with expertise to assist States and Indian Tribes to design, expand, and improve the delivery of services); individual practitioners working with children and families; the courts; representatives or other States or Indian Tribes with experience in administering family preservation and family support services; and academicians, especially those assisting the child and family service agency with management information systems, training curricula, and evaluations;

(viii) Representatives of State and local agencies administering Federal and federally assisted programs which may include: Head Start; the local education agency (school-linked social services, adult education and literacy programs, Part H programs); developmental disabilities; nutrition services (Food Stamps, Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC)); Title IV-A; runaway youth, youth gang, juvenile justice programs and youth residential and training institutions; child care and development block grant (CCDBG) and respite care programs; domestic and community violence prevention and services programs; housing programs; the health agency (substance abuse, Healthy Start, maternal and child health, Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT), mental health, and public health nursing); law enforcement; Children's Trust Funds; Community-Based Family Resource Programs, and new Federal initiatives such as the Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Communities Program; and

(ix) Administrators, supervisors and front line workers (direct service providers) of the State child and family services agency.

(4) The CFSP must describe the ongoing consultation process that each grantee will use to ensure the continued involvement of a wide range of major actors in meeting the goals and objectives over the five-year operational period of the plan and developing the Annual Progress and Services Report.

(m) Services coordination. (1) States must include in the ongoing coordination process representatives of the full range of child and family services provided by the State agency as well as other service delivery systems providing social, health, education, and economic services (including mental health, substance abuse, developmental disabilities, and housing) to improve access and deliver a range of services to children and their families.

(2) The State's CFSP must describe how services under the plan will be coordinated over the five-year period with services or benefits under other Federal or federally assisted programs serving the same populations to achieve the goals and objectives in the plan. The description must include the participants in the process and examples of how the process led or will lead to additional coordination of services (e.g., integrated service models, improved accessibility, use of a consolidated application or intake form, inter-disciplinary training, coordinated case management for several programs, pooled resources through blended financing, shared information across services providers and compatible and linked automated information systems, co-location of several services or programs.)

(3) The Indian Tribe must include in the coordination process representatives of other Federal or federally assisted child and family services or related programs. The Indian Tribe's CFSP must describe how services under the plan will be coordinated over the five-year period with services or benefits under other Federal or federally assisted programs serving the same populations to achieve the goals and objectives in the plan. The descriptions must include the participants in the process and any examples of how the process led or will lead to additional coordination of services.

(n) Services. (1) The State's CFSP must describe the publicly funded child and family services continuum: child welfare services (including child abuse and neglect prevention, intervention, and treatment services; and foster care); family preservation services; family support services; and services to support reunification, adoption, kinship care, independent living, or other permanent living arrangements.

(2) The Indian Tribe's CFSP must describe the child welfare services (including child abuse and neglect prevention, intervention, treatment services and foster care) and/or the family support and family preservation services to be provided.

(3) For each service described, the CFSP must include the following information, or it must be listed on the CFS-101, Part II:

(i) The population(s) to be served;

(ii) The geographic area(s) where the services will be available;

(iii) The estimated number of individuals and/or families to be served;

(iv) The estimated expenditures for these services from Federal, State, local, and donated sources, including title IV-B, subparts 1 and 2, the CAPTA program referenced in paragraph (a) of this section, and the independent living program.

(o) Family preservation and family support services and linkages to other social and health services. (1) The State's CFSP must explain how the funds under title IV-B, subpart 2 of the Act, will be used to develop or expand family support and family preservation services; how the family support and family preservation services relate to existing family support and family preservation services; and how these family support and preservation services will be linked to other services in the child and family services continuum.

(2) The State's CFSP must explain whether and/or how funds under the CAPTA and independent living programs are coordinated with and integrated into the child and family services continuum described in the plan.

(3) The State's CFSP must describe the existing or current linkages and the coordination of services between the services in the child and family services continuum and the services in other public services systems (e.g., health, education, housing, substance abuse, the courts), and other Federal and non-federally funded public and nonprofit private programs (e.g., Children's Trust Funds, Community-Based Family Resource Programs, private foundations.)

(p) Services in relation to service principles. The CFSP must describe how the child and family services to be provided are designed to assure the safety and protection of children as well as the preservation and support of families, and how they are or will be designed to be consistent with the other service principles in 45 CFR 1355.25.

(q) Services in relation to permanency planning. For States administering both title IV-B programs (subparts 1 and 2), the CFSP must explain how these services will help meet the permanency provisions for children and families in sections 422(b)(9) and 471 of the Act (e.g., preplacement preventive services, reunification services, independent living services.) The CFSP must describe the arrangements, jointly developed with the Indian Tribes within its borders, made for the provision of the child welfare services and protections in section 422(b)(9) to Indian children under both State and Tribal jurisdiction.

(r) Decision-making process: selection of family support programs for funding. The State's CFSP must include an explanation of how agencies and organizations were selected for funding to provide family support services and how these agencies and organizations meet the requirement that family support services be community-based.

(s) Significant portion of funds used for family support and family preservation services. With each fiscal year's budget request, each State must indicate the specific percentage of family preservation and family support funds (title IV-B, subpart 2) that the State will expend for community-based family support and for family preservation services, and the rationale for the decision. The State must have an especially strong rationale if the request for either percentage is below 25 percent. It must also include an explanation of how this distribution was reached and why it meets the requirements that a “significant portion” of the service funds must be spent for each service. Examples of important considerations might include the nature of the planning efforts that led to the decision, the level of existing State effort in each area, and the resulting need for new or expanded services.

(t) Staff training, technical assistance, and evaluation. (1) The State's CFSP must include a staff development and training plan in support of the goals and objectives in the CFSP which addresses both of the title IV-B programs covered by the plan. This training plan also must be combined with the training plan under title IV-E as required by 45 CFR 1356.60(b)(2). Training must be an on-going activity and must include content from various disciplines and knowledge bases relevant to child and family services policies, programs and practices. Training content must also support the cross-system coordination consultation basic to the development of the CFSP.

(2) The State's CFSP must describe the technical assistance activities that will be undertaken in support of the goals and objectives in the plan.

(3) The State's CFSP must describe any evaluation and research activities underway or planned with which the State agency is involved or participating and which are related to the goals and objectives in the plan.

(u) Quality assurance. The State must include in the CFSP a description of the quality assurance system it will use to regularly assess the quality of services under the CFSP and assure that there will be measures to address identified problems.

(v) Distribution of the CFSP and the annual progress and services report. The CFSP must include a description of how the State and the Indian Tribe will make available to interested parties the CFSP and the Annual Progress and Services Report. (See 45 CFR 1355.21(c) and 45 CFR 1357.16(d)). State agencies and Indian Tribal organizations within the State must exchange copies of their CFSPs and their annual services reports.

(This requirement has been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under OMB Control Number 0980-0047. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number.)

[61 FR 58656, Nov. 18, 1996, as amended at 66 FR 58677, Nov. 23, 2001]

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§1357.16   Annual progress and services reports.

(a) Annual progress and services reports. Annually, each State and each Indian Tribe must conduct an interim review of the progress made in the previous year toward accomplishing the goals and objectives in the plan, based on updated information. In developing paragraphs (a)(2) through (a)(4) of this section, the State and the Indian Tribe must involve the agencies, organizations, and individuals who are a part of the on-going CFSP-related consultation and coordination process. On the basis of this review, each State and Indian Tribe must prepare and submit to ACF, and make available to the public, an Annual Progress and Services Report which must include the following—

(1) A report on the specific accomplishments and progress made in the past fiscal year toward meeting each goal and objective, including improved outcomes for children and families, and a more comprehensive, coordinated, effective child and family services continuum;

(2) Any revisions in the statement of goals and objectives, or to the training plan, if necessary, to reflect changed circumstances;

(3) For Indian Tribes, a description of the child welfare and/or family preservation and family support services to be provided in the upcoming fiscal year highlighting any changes in services or program design and including the information required in 45 CFR 1357.15(n);

(4) For States, a description of the child protective, child welfare, family preservation, family support, and independent living services to be provided in the upcoming fiscal year highlighting any additions or changes in services or program design and including the information required in 45 CFR 1357.15(n);

(5) Information on activities in the areas of training, technical assistance, research, evaluation, or management information systems that will be carried out in the upcoming fiscal year in support of the goals and objectives in the plan;

(6) For States only, the information required to meet the maintenance of effort (non-supplantation) requirement in section 432(a) (7) and (8) of the Act;

(7) For States and eligible Indian Tribes phasing in requirements for a consolidated CFSP, information on activities and progress directed toward a consolidated plan by June 30, 1996 or 1997. The report must include information that demonstrates States' and eligible Indian Tribes' progress toward the consolidation of a CFSP, including activities that have been accomplished and still need to be accomplished; and

(8) Any other information the State or the Indian Tribe wishes to include.

(b) Submittal of the annual progress and services report and CFS-101. (1) The State and the Indian Tribe must send the Annual Progress and Services Report and the CFS-101 to the appropriate ACF Regional Office no later than June 30 of the year prior to the fiscal year in which the services will be provided (e.g., the report submitted and made public by June 30, 1996 will describe the services to be provided in FY 1997. The report covering FY 1998 services must be submitted by June 30, 1997.)

(2) In order for States and eligible Indian Tribes to receive title IV-B, subparts 1 and 2 allocations a CFS-101 must be submitted for each fiscal year.

(3) States and Indian Tribes which have consolidated the requirements for title IV-B, subparts 1 and 2, must submit the CFS-101 to the appropriate ACF Regional Office no later than June 30 of the year prior to the fiscal year in which the services will be provided (e.g., for FY 1997 allocations, the CFS-101 must be submitted by June 30, 1996; for FY 1998 allocations, the CFS-101 must be submitted by June 30, 1997.)

(4) States and eligible Indian Tribes choosing to phase-in the requirements for a consolidated CFSP must:

(i) Submit by June 30, 1996 a CFS-101 for title IV-B, subpart 1 for FY 1996 allocations; a CFS-101 for title IV-B, subpart 2 for FY 1997 allocations; and, if a State or eligible Indian Tribe chooses, a CFS-101 for subpart 1 FY 1997 allocations.

(ii) Submit by June 30, 1997 a CFS-101 for title IV-B, subpart 1 for FY 1997 allocations, if not previously submitted by June 30, 1996; and a CFS-101 for FY 1998 for subparts 1 and 2 allocations.

(c) Annual progress and services reports on FY 1994 family support and family preservation services. Each State and Indian Tribe that used FY 1994 funds under title IV-B, subpart 2, for services must describe in the CFSP what services were provided, the population(s) served, and the geographic areas where services were available. The CFSP also must include the amount of FY 1994 funds used for planning, for family preservation services, for family support services, and a brief statement on how these services met the service priorities of the State or the Indian Tribe.

(d) Availability of the annual progress and services report. The State and the Indian Tribe must make the Annual Progress and Services Report available to the public including the agencies, organizations, and individuals with which the State or the Indian Tribe is coordinating services or consulting and to other interested members of the public. Each State and eligible Indian Tribe within the State must exchange copies of their Annual Progress and Services Reports.

(e) FY 1999 Final Review. In FY 1999, each State and eligible Indian Tribe must conduct a final review of progress toward accomplishing the goals and objectives in the plan. On the basis of the final review, it must—

(1) Prepare a final report on the progress made toward accomplishing the goals and objectives; and

(2) Send the final report to the ACF Regional Office and make it available to the public.

(f) FY 2000 Five-Year State Plan. Based on the FY 1999 final review and final Annual Progress and Services Report, and in consultation with a broad range of agencies, organizations, and individuals, the States and eligible Indian Tribes must develop a new five-year CFSP following the requirements of 45 CFR 1357.15.

(This requirement has been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under OMB Control Number 0980-0047. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number.)

[61 FR 58659, Nov. 18, 1996, as amended at 66 FR 58677, Nov. 23, 2001]

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§1357.20   Child abuse and neglect programs.

The State agency must assure that, with regard to any child abuse and neglect programs or projects funded under title IV-B of the Act, the requirements of section 106(b) (1) and (2) of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, as amended, are met. These requirements relate to the State plan and assurances required for the Child Abuse and Neglect State Grant Program.

[61 FR 58660, Nov. 18, 1996]

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§1357.25   Requirements for eligibility for additional payments under section 427.

(a) For any fiscal year after FY 1979 in which a sum in excess of $141,000,000 is appropriated under Section 420 of the Act, a State is not eligible for payment of an amount greater than the amount for which it would be eligible if the appropriation were equal to $141,000,000 unless the State complies with the requirements of Section 427(a) of the Act.

(b) In meeting the requirements for the inventory and statewide information system in sections 427 (a)(1) and (2)(A) of the Act, the inventory and statewide information system must include those children under the placement and care responsibility of the State title IV-B or IV-E agencies. At the State's discretion, other children may be included. The six month requirement in section 427(a)(1) and the twelve month requirement in section 427(a)(2)(A) of the Act must also be met.

(The requirement has been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under OMB Control Number 0980-0138)

(c) If, for each of any two consecutive fiscal years after FY 1979, there is appropriated under Section 420 of the Act a sum equal to or greater than $266,000,000, a State's allotment amount for any fiscal year after two such consecutive fiscal years shall be reduced to an amount equal to what the allotment amount would have been for FY 1979 unless the State has implemented the requirements of section 427(b) of the Act.

(d) In meeting the requirements of section 427(a)(2)(B) of the Act for dispositional hearings the State agency must meet the requirements of section 475(5)(C) of the Act and 45 CFR 1356.21(e).

(e) A State may appeal a final decision by ACYF that the State has not met the requirements of this section and section 427 of the Act to the Department Grant Appeals Board under the provisions of 45 CFR part 16.

[48 FR 23118, May 23, 1983]

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§1357.30   State fiscal requirements (title IV-B, subpart 1, child welfare services).

(a) Scope. The requirements of this section shall apply to all funds allotted or reallotted to States under title IV-B, subpart 1.

(b) Allotments. Allotments for each State shall be determined in accordance with section 421 of the Act.

(c) Payments. Payments to States shall be made in accordance with section 423 of the Act.

(d) Enforcement and termination. In the event of a State's failure to comply with the terms of the grant under title IV-B, subpart 1, the provisions of 45 CFR 75.371 through 75.372 will apply.

(e) Matching or cost-sharing. Federal financial participation is available only if costs are incurred in implementing sections 422, 423, and 425 of the Act in accordance with the grants administration requirements of 45 CFR part 75 with the following conditions—

(1) The State's contribution may be in cash, donated funds, and non-public third party in-kind contributions.

(2) The total of Federal funds used for the following purposes under title IV-B, subpart 1 may not exceed an amount equal to the FY 1979 Federal payment under title IV-B:

(i) Child day care necessary solely because of the employment, or training to prepare for employment, of a parent or other relative with whom the child involved is living, plus;

(ii) Foster care maintenance payments, plus;

(iii) Adoption assistance payments.

(3) Notwithstanding paragraph (e)(2) of this section, State expenditures required to match the title IV-B, subpart 1 allotment may include foster care maintenance expenditures in any amount.

(f) Prohibition against purchase or construction of facilities. Funds awarded under title IV-B may not be used for the purchase or construction of facilities.

(g) Maintenance of effort. (1) A State may not receive an amount of Federal funds under title IV-B in excess of the Federal payment made in FY 1979 under title IV-B unless the State's total expenditure of State and local appropriated funds for child welfare services under title IV-B of the Act is equal to or greater than the total of the State's expenditure from State and local appropriated funds used for similar covered services and programs under title IV-B in FY 1979.

(2) In computing a State's level of expenditures under this section in FY 1979 and any subsequent fiscal year, the following costs shall not be included—

(i) Expenditures and costs for child day care necessary to support the employment of a parent or other relative;

(ii) Foster care maintenance payments; and

(iii) Adoption assistance payments.

(3) A State applying for an amount of Federal funds under title IV-B greater than the amount of title IV-B, subpart 1 funds received by that State in FY 1979 shall certify:

(i) The amount of their expenditure in FY 1979 for child welfare services as described in paragraphs (g) (1) and (2) of this section, and

(ii) The amount of State and local funds that have been appropriated and are available for child welfare services as described in paragraphs (g) (1) and (2) of this section for the fiscal year for which application for funds is being made. Records verifying the required certification shall be maintained by the State and made available to the Secretary as necessary to confirm compliance with this section.

(h) Reallotment. (1) When a State certifies to the Commissioner that funds available to that State under its title IV-B, subpart 1 allotment will not be required, those funds shall be available for reallotment to other States.

(2) When a State, after receiving notice from the Commissioner of the availability of funds, does not certify by a date fixed by the Commissioner that it will be able to expend during the period stated in paragraph (i) of this section all of the funds available to it under its title IV-B, subpart 1 allotment, those funds shall be available for reallotment to other States.

(3) The Commissioner may reallot available funds to another State when it is determined that—

(i) The requesting State's plan requires funds in excess of the State's original allotment; and

(ii) the State will be able to expend the additional funds during the period stated in paragraph (i) of this section.

(i) Time limit on expenditures. Funds under title IV-B, subpart 1, must be expended by September 30 of the fiscal year following the fiscal year in which the funds were awarded.

[61 FR 58660, Nov. 18, 1996, as amended at 81 FR 3023, Jan. 20, 2016]

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§1357.32   State fiscal requirements (title IV-B, subpart 2, family preservation and family support services).

(a) Scope. The requirements of this section apply to all funds allocated to States under title IV-B, subpart 2, of the Act.

(b) Allotments. The annual allotment to each State shall be made in accordance with section 433 of the Act.

(c) Payments. Payments to each State will be made in accordance with section 434 of the Act.

(d) Matching or cost sharing. Funds used to provide services in FY 1994 and in subsequent years will be federally reimbursed at 75 percent of allowable expenditures. (This is the same Federal financial participation rate as title IV-B, subpart 1.) Federal funds, however, will not exceed the amount of the State's allotment.

(1) The State's contribution may be in cash, donated funds, and non-public third party in-kind contributions.

(2) Except as provided by Federal statute, other Federal funds may not be used to meet the matching requirement.

(e) Prohibition against purchase or construction of facilities. Funds awarded under title IV-B may not be used for the purchase or construction of facilities.

(f) Maintenance of effort. States may not use the Federal funds under title IV-B, subpart 2, to supplant Federal or non-Federal funds for existing family preservation and family support services. For the purpose of implementing this requirement, “non-Federal funds” means State funds. ACF will collect information annually from each State on expenditures for family support and family preservation using the State fiscal year 1992 as the base year.

(g) Time limits on expenditures. Funds must be expended by September 30 of the fiscal year following the fiscal year in which the funds were awarded.

(h) Administrative costs. (1) States claiming Federal financial participation for services provided in FY 1994 and subsequent years may not claim more than 10 percent of expenditures under subpart 2 for administrative costs. There is no limit on the percentage of administrative costs which may be reported as State match.

(2) For the purposes of title IV-B, subpart 2, “administrative costs” are costs of auxiliary functions as identified through as agency's accounting system which are:

(i) Allocable (in accordance with the agency's approved cost allocation plan) to the title IV-B, subpart 2 program cost centers;

(ii) necessary to sustain the direct effort involved in administering the State plan for title IV-B, subpart 2, or an activity providing service to the program: and

(iii) centralized in the grantee department or in some other agency, and may include but are not limited to the following: Procurement; payroll; personnel functions; management, maintenance and operation of space and property; data processing and computer services; accounting; budgeting; auditing.

(3) Program costs are costs, other than administrative costs, incurred in connection with developing and implementing the CFSP (e.g., delivery of services, planning, consultation, coordination, training, quality assurance measures, data collection, evaluations, supervision).

[61 FR 58661, Nov. 18, 1996]

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§1357.40   Direct payments to Indian Tribal Organizations (title IV-B, subpart 1, child welfare services).

(a) Who may apply for direct funding? Any Indian Tribal Organization (ITO) that meets the definitions in section 428(c) of the Act, or any consortium or other group of eligible Tribal organizations authorized by the membership of the Tribes to act for them is eligible to apply for direct funding if the ITO, consortium or group has a plan for child welfare services that is jointly developed by the ITO and the Department.

(b) Title IV-B Child and Family Services Plan (CFSP). (1) In order to receive funds under title IV-B, subpart 1, beginning in FY 1995, the Indian Tribe or Tribal organization must have in effect an approved five-year child and family services plan that meets the applicable requirements of §1357.15 of this part.

(2) The Indian Tribe or Tribal organization must also comply with section 422(b)(1-8) of the Act; 45 CFR part 1355 (except that the requirements in §1355.30 for a single Tribal agency and Governor's review of the CFSP do not apply); and other applicable requirements of §§1357.10 and 1357.16.

(c) Information related to the requirements of Section 422(b)(9) of the Act. The following information must be submitted with the assurances required to be eligible for title IV-B, subpart 1 funds:

(1) A description of the arrangements, jointly developed with the State, made for the provision of the child welfare services and protections in section 422(b)(9) to Indian children under both State and Tribal jurisdiction;

(2) A statement of the legal responsibility, if any, for children who are in foster care on the reservation and those awaiting adoption;

(3) A description of Tribal jurisdiction in civil and criminal matters, existence or nonexistence of a Tribal court and the type of court and codes, if any;

(4) An identification of the standards for foster family homes and institutional care and day care;

(5) The Indian Tribal organization's political subdivisions, if any;

(6) Whether the Tribal organization is controlled, sanctioned or chartered by the governing body of Indians to be served and if so, documentation of that fact;

(7) Any limitations on authorities granted to the Indian Tribal organizations; and

(8) The Tribal resolution(s) authorizing an application for a direct title IV-B, subpart 1 grant under this Part.

(d) Grants: General. (1) Grants may be made to eligible Indian Tribal organizations in a State which has a jointly developed child and family services plan approved and in effect.

(2) Federal funds made available for a direct grant to an eligible ITO shall be paid by the Department, from the title IV-B allotment for the State in which the ITO is located. Should a direct grant be approved, the Department shall promptly notify the State(s) affected.

(3) If an eligible ITO includes population from more than one State, a proportionate amount of the grant will be paid from each State's allotment.

(4) The receipt of title IV-B funds must be in addition to and not a substitute for funds otherwise previously expended by the ITO for child welfare services.

(5) The following fiscal and administrative requirements apply to Indian Tribal grants under this section:

(i) Enforcement and termination. In the event of an Indian Tribe's failure to comply with the terms of the grant under title IV-B, subpart 1, the provisions of 45 CFR 75.371 through 75.372 will apply.

(ii) Matching or cost-sharing. Federal financial participation is available only if costs are incurred in implementing sections 422, 423, and 425 of the Act in accordance with the grants administration requirements of 45 CFR part 75 with the following conditions—

(A) The ITO's contribution may be in cash, donated funds, and non-public third party in-kind contributions.

(B) The total of Federal funds used for the following purposes under title IV-B, subpart 1 may not exceed an amount equal to the FY 1979 Federal payment under title IV-B:

(1) Child day care necessary solely because of the employment, or training to prepare for employment, of a parent or other relative with whom the child involved is living, plus;

(2) Foster care maintenance payments, plus;

(3) Adoption assistance payments.

(C) Notwithstanding paragraph (d)(5)(ii)(B) of this section, Tribal expenditures required to match the title IV-B, subpart 1 allotment may include foster care maintenance expenditures in any amount.

(iii) Prohibition against purchase or construction of facilities. Funds awarded under title IV-B may not be used for the purchase or construction of facilities.

(iv) Time limit on expenditures. Funds under title IV-B, subpart 1, must be expended by September 30 of the fiscal year following the fiscal year in which the funds were awarded.

(6) In order to determine the amount of Federal funds available for a direct grant to an eligible ITO, the Department shall first divide the State's title IV-B allotment by the number of children in the State, then multiply the resulting amount by a multiplication factor determined by the Secretary, and then multiply that amount by the number of Indian children in the ITO population. The multiplication factor will be set at a level designed to achieve the purposes of the act and revised as appropriate.

[61 FR 58661, Nov. 18, 1996, as amended at 65 FR 4093, Jan. 25, 2000; 81 FR 3023, Jan. 20, 2016]

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§1357.50   Direct payments to Indian Tribal organizations (title IV-B, subpart 2, family preservation and support services).

(a) Definitions.

Alaska Native Organization means any organized group of Alaska Natives eligible to operate a Federal program under the Indian Self-Determination Act (Pub. L. 93-638) or such group's designee as defined in section 482(i)(7)(A) of the Act.

Indian Tribe means any Tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community of Indians that is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians; and for which a reservation (including Indian reservations, public domain Indian allotments, and former Indian reservations in Oklahoma) exists.

Tribal organization means the recognized governing body of the Indian Tribe.

(b) Eligibility for funds: FY 1994. (1) Section 432(b)(2) of the Act provides that the Secretary may not approve a plan of an Indian Tribe whose FY 1995 allotment under subpart 2 would be less than $10,000. Therefore, only those Indian Tribes whose FY 1995 allotment is $10,000 or more are eligible to receive funds beginning in FY 1994.

(2) ACF will pay any amount to which an Indian Tribe is entitled to the Tribal organization of the Indian Tribe.

(c) Eligibility for funds: FY 1995. In order to receive funds under title IV-B, subpart 2, in FY 1995, an Indian Tribe that is eligible for planning funds in FY 1994 must submit a Child and Family Services Plan that meets the applicable requirements in section 1357.15 of this Part.

(d) Eligibility for funds: FY 1996 through FY 1998. (1) ACF will make grants to additional Indian Tribes in Fys 1996 through 1998 in the event that there are increased appropriations.

(2) Allotments will be calculated in Fys 1996, 1997, and 1998 as required in section 433 of the Act. Those Indian Tribes in each year whose allotment is at least $10,000 will be notified of their eligibility to apply.

(3) In order to receive funds, additional Indian Tribes which become eligible for grants in FY 1996, 1997, and 1998 must submit either a five year Child and Family Services Plan (CFSP) that meets the applicable requirements of 45 CFR 1357.15 or an application for planning funds by June 30 of the year in which they first become eligible for grants. Those Indian Tribes which submitted an application for planning funds in their first year of funding must submit a five year CFSP that meets the applicable requirements of 45 CFR 1357.15 by June 30 of the second year they receive funding. For example, in order to receive funds, an Indian Tribe which becomes eligible to receive funding beginning in FY 1996 must submit either an application for planning funds or a CFSP by June 30, 1996. If the Indian Tribe submitted an application for planning funds in FY 1996, they must submit a CFSP by June 30, 1997.

(4) All Indian Tribes will be Federally reimbursed at 75 percent of allowable expenditures. Federal funds without match are available in the first year of receipt of funds for additional Indian Tribes meeting the following criteria:

(i) Submittal of an application for planning funds, and not a five year CFSP;

(ii) Receipt of an initial award in FY 1996 or 1997 or 1998; and

(iii) A proposal to spend the entire grant in the first year on planning.

(e) Allotments. Allotments to Indian Tribes are computed based on section 433 of the Act and are based on a ratio of the number of children in each Indian Tribe with an approved plan compared to the number of children in all Indian Tribes with approved plans, based on the most current and reliable data available.

(f) Exemptions of requirements. (1) ACF has exempted Indian Tribes from three statutory requirements:

(i) The limitation on administrative costs to 10 percent of total Federal and Tribal funds—Indian Tribes may use the indirect cost rate agreement in effect for the Tribe;

(ii) The requirement for maintenance of effort that funds under this program may not be used to supplant other Federal and non-Federal funds; and

(iii) The requirement that a significant portion of funds must be used for both family support and family preservation services.

(2) Specific exemptions from other statutory requirements may be requested by the Tribe in the course of its joint planning. Such a request must contain a compelling reason.

(g) Matching requirement. (1) Funds used to provide services in FY 1994 and in subsequent years will be federally reimbursed at 75 percent of allowable expenditures. (This is the same Federal financial participation rate as title IV-B, subpart 1.) The Indian Tribe's match must be at least 25 percent of the total project costs or one-third of the Federal share. Federal funds, however, will not exceed the amount of the Indian Tribe's allotment.

(2) The Indian Tribe's contribution may be in cash, donated funds, and non-public third party in-kind contributions.

(3) Indian Tribes, by statute, may use the following three Federal sources of funds as matching funds: Indian Child Welfare Act funds, Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act funds, and Community Development Block Grant funds.

(h) Time limits on expenditures. An Indian Tribe must expend all funds by September 30 of the fiscal year following the fiscal year in which the funds were awarded.

[61 FR 58662, Nov. 18, 1996]

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