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Title 45 Part 1356

Title 45 → Subtitle B → Chapter XIII → Subchapter G → Part 1356

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 45 Part 1356

e-CFR data is current as of August 16, 2018

Title 45Subtitle BChapter XIIISubchapter G → Part 1356


Title 45: Public Welfare


PART 1356—REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E


Contents
§1356.10   Scope.
§1356.20   Title IV-E plan document and submission requirements.
§1356.21   Foster care maintenance payments program implementation requirements.
§1356.22   Implementation requirements for children voluntarily placed in foster care.
§1356.30   Safety requirements for foster care and adoptive home providers.
§1356.40   Adoption assistance program: Administrative requirements to implement section 473 of the Act.
§1356.41   Nonrecurring expenses of adoption.
§1356.50   Withholding of funds for non-compliance with the approved title IV-E plan.
§1356.60   Fiscal requirements (title IV-E).
§§1356.65-1356.66   [Reserved]
§1356.67   Procedures for the transfer of placement and care responsibility of a child from a State to a Tribal title IV-E agency or an Indian Tribe with a title IV-E agreement.
§1356.68   Tribal title IV-E agency requirements for in-kind administrative and training contributions from third-party sources.
§§1356.69-1356.70   [Reserved]
§1356.71   Federal review of the eligibility of children in foster care and the eligibility of foster care providers in title IV-E programs.
§1356.80   Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.
§1356.81   Reporting population.
§1356.82   Data collection requirements.
§1356.83   Reporting requirements and data elements.
§1356.84   Sampling.
§1356.85   Compliance.
§1356.86   Penalties for noncompliance.
Appendix A to Part 1356—NYTD Data Elements
Appendix B to Part 1356—NYTD Youth Outcome Survey
Appendix C to Part 1356—Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

Authority: 42 U.S.C. 620 et seq., 42 U.S.C. 670 et seq.; 42 U.S.C. 1302.

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§1356.10   Scope.

This part applies to title IV-E agency programs for foster care maintenance payments, adoption assistance payments, related foster care and adoption administrative and training expenditures, and the independent living services program under title IV-E of the Act.

[77 FR 946, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§1356.20   Title IV-E plan document and submission requirements.

(a) To be in compliance with the title IV-E plan requirements and to be eligible to receive Federal financial participation (FFP) in the costs of foster care maintenance payments and adoption assistance under this part, a title IV-E agency must have a plan approved by the Secretary that meets the requirements of this part, part 1355, section 471(a) of the Act and for Tribal title IV-E agencies, section 479B(c) of the Act. The title IV-E plan must be submitted to the appropriate Regional Office, ACYF, in a form determined by the title IV-E agency.

(b) Failure by a title IV-E agency to comply with the requirements and standards for the data reporting system for foster care and adoption (§1355.40 of this chapter) shall be considered a substantial failure by the title IV-E agency in complying with the plan.

(c) The following procedures for approval of plans and amendments apply to the title IV-E program:

(1) Plan. The plan consists of written documents furnished by the title IV-E agency to cover its program under part E of title IV. After approval of the original plan by the Commissioner, ACYF, all relevant changes, required by new statutes, rules, regulations, interpretations, and court decisions, are required to be submitted currently so that ACYF may determine whether the plan continues to meet Federal requirements and policies.

(2) Submittal. Plans and revisions of the plans are submitted first to the State governor or his/her designee, or the Tribal leader or his/her designee for review and then to the regional office, ACYF. Title IV-E agencies are encouraged to obtain consultation of the regional staff when a plan is in process of preparation or revision.

(3) Review. Staff in the regional offices are responsible for review of plans and amendments. They also initiate discussion with the title IV-E agency on clarification of significant aspects of the plan which come to their attention in the course of this review. Plan material on which the regional staff has questions concerning the application of Federal policy is referred with recommendations as required to the central office for technical assistance. Comments and suggestions, including those of consultants in specified areas, may be prepared by the central office for use by the regional staff in negotiations with the title IV-E agency.

(4) Action. ACYF has the authority to approve plans and amendments thereto which provide for the administration of foster care maintenance payments and adoption assistance programs under section 471 of the Act. The Commissioner, ACYF, retains the authority to determine that proposed plan material is not approvable, or that a previously approved plan no longer meets the requirements for approval. The Regional Office, ACYF, formally notifies the title IV-E agency of the actions taken on plans or revisions.

(5) Basis for approval. Determinations as to whether plans (including plan amendments and administrative practice under the plans) originally meet or continue to meet, the requirements for approval are based on relevant Federal statutes and regulations.

(6) Prompt approval of plans. The determination as to whether a plan submitted for approval conforms to the requirements for approval under the Act and regulations issued pursuant thereto shall be made promptly and not later than the 45th day following the date on which the plan submittal is received in the regional office, unless the Regional Office, ACYF, has secured from the title IV-E agency a written agreement to extend that period.

(7) Prompt approval of plan amendments. Any amendment of an approved plan may, at the option of the title IV-E agency, be considered as a submission of a new plan. If the title IV-E agency requests that such amendment be so considered, the determination as to its conformity with the requirements for approval shall be made promptly and not later than the 45th day following the date on which such a request is received in the regional office with respect to an amendment that has been received in such office, unless the Regional Office, ACYF, has secured from the title IV-E agency a written agreement to extend that period. In absence of request by a title IV-E agency that an amendment of an approved plan shall be considered as a submission of a new plan, the procedures under §201.6(a) and (b) shall be applicable.

(8) Effective date. The effective date of a new plan may not be earlier than the first day of the calendar quarter in which an approvable plan is submitted, and with respect to expenditures for assistance under such plan, may not be earlier than the first day on which the plan is in operation on a statewide basis or, in the case of a Tribal title IV-E agency, in operation in the Tribal title IV-E agency's entire service area. The same applies with respect to plan amendments.

(d) Once the title IV-E plan has been submitted and approved, it shall remain in effect until amendments are required. An amendment is required if there is any significant and relevant change in the information or assurances in the plan, or the organization, policies or operations described in the plan.

[77 FR 946, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§1356.21   Foster care maintenance payments program implementation requirements.

(a) Statutory and regulatory requirements of the Federal foster care program. To implement the foster care maintenance payments program provisions of the title IV-E plan and to be eligible to receive Federal financial participation (FFP) for foster care maintenance payments under this part, a title IV-E agency must meet the requirements of this section, 45 CFR 1356.22, 45 CFR 1356.30, and sections 472, 475(1), 475(4), 475(5), 475(6), and for a Tribal title IV-E agency section 479(B)(c)(1)(C)(ii)(II) of the Act.

(b) Reasonable efforts. The title IV-E agency must make reasonable efforts to maintain the family unit and prevent the unnecessary removal of a child from his/her home, as long as the child's safety is assured; to effect the safe reunification of the child and family (if temporary out-of-home placement is necessary to ensure the immediate safety of the child); and to make and finalize alternate permanency plans in a timely manner when reunification is not appropriate or possible. In order to satisfy the “reasonable efforts” requirements of section 471(a)(15) (as implemented through section 472(a)(2) of the Act), the title IV-E agency must meet the requirements of paragraphs (b) and (d) of this section. In determining reasonable efforts to be made with respect to a child and in making such reasonable efforts, the child's health and safety must be the paramount concern.

(1) Judicial determination of reasonable efforts to prevent a child's removal from the home. (i) When a child is removed from his/her home, the judicial determination as to whether reasonable efforts were made, or were not required to prevent the removal, in accordance with paragraph (b)(3) of this section, must be made no later than 60 days from the date the child is removed from the home pursuant to paragraph (k)(1)(ii) of this section.

(ii) If the determination concerning reasonable efforts to prevent the removal is not made as specified in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section, the child is not eligible under the title IV-E foster care maintenance payments program for the duration of that stay in foster care.

(2) Judicial determination of reasonable efforts to finalize a permanency plan. (i) The title IV-E agency must obtain a judicial determination that it has made reasonable efforts to finalize the permanency plan that is in effect (whether the plan is reunification, adoption, legal guardianship, placement with a fit and willing relative, or placement in another planned permanent living arrangement) within twelve months of the date the child is considered to have entered foster care in accordance with the definition at §1355.20 of this part, and at least once every twelve months thereafter while the child is in foster care.

(ii) If such a judicial determination regarding reasonable efforts to finalize a permanency plan is not made in accordance with the schedule prescribed in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of this section, the child becomes ineligible under title IV-E at the end of the month in which the judicial determination was required to have been made, and remains ineligible until such a determination is made.

(3) Circumstances in which reasonable efforts are not required to prevent a child's removal from home or to reunify the child and family. Reasonable efforts to prevent a child's removal from home or to reunify the child and family are not required if the title IV-E agency obtains a judicial determination that such efforts are not required because:

(i) A court of competent jurisdiction has determined that the parent has subjected the child to aggravated circumstances (as defined in State, or for a Tribal title IV-E agency, Tribal law, which definition may include but need not be limited to abandonment, torture, chronic abuse, and sexual abuse);

(ii) A court of competent jurisdiction has determined that the parent has been convicted of:

(A) Murder (which would have been an offense under section 1111(a) of title 18, United States Code, if the offense had occurred in the special maritime or territorial jurisdiction of the United States) of another child of the parent;

(B) Voluntary manslaughter (which would have been an offense under section 1112(a) of title 18, United States Code, if the offense had occurred in the special maritime or territorial jurisdiction of the United States) of another child of the parent;

(C) Aiding or abetting, attempting, conspiring, or soliciting to commit such a murder or such a voluntary manslaughter; or

(D) A felony assault that results in serious bodily injury to the child or another child of the parent; or,

(iii) The parental rights of the parent with respect to a sibling have been terminated involuntarily.

(4) Concurrent planning. Reasonable efforts to finalize an alternate permanency plan may be made concurrently with reasonable efforts to reunify the child and family.

(5) Use of the Federal Parent Locator Service. The State agency may seek the services of the Federal Parent Locator Service to search for absent parents at any point in order to facilitate a permanency plan.

(c) Contrary to the welfare determination. Under section 472(a)(2) of the Act, a child's removal from the home must have been the result of a judicial determination (unless the child was removed pursuant to a voluntary placement agreement) to the effect that continuation of residence in the home would be contrary to the welfare, or that placement would be in the best interest, of the child. The contrary to the welfare determination must be made in the first court ruling that sanctions (even temporarily) the removal of a child from home. If the determination regarding contrary to the welfare is not made in the first court ruling pertaining to removal from the home, the child is not eligible for title IV-E foster care maintenance payments for the duration of that stay in foster care.

(d) Documentation of judicial determinations. The judicial determinations regarding contrary to the welfare, reasonable efforts to prevent removal, and reasonable efforts to finalize the permanency plan in effect, including judicial determinations that reasonable efforts are not required, must be explicitly documented and must be made on a case-by-case basis and so stated in the court order.

(1) If the reasonable efforts and contrary to the welfare judicial determinations are not included as required in the court orders identified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, a transcript of the court proceedings is the only other documentation that will be accepted to verify that these required determinations have been made.

(2) Neither affidavits nor nunc pro tunc orders will be accepted as verification documentation in support of reasonable efforts and contrary to the welfare judicial determinations except for a Tribal title IV-E agency for the first 12 months that agency's title IV-E plan is in effect as provided for in section 479B(c)(1)(C)(ii)(I) of the Act.

(3) Court orders that reference State or Tribal law to substantiate judicial determinations are not acceptable, even if such law provides that a removal must be based on a judicial determination that remaining in the home would be contrary to the child's welfare or that removal can only be ordered after reasonable efforts have been made.

(e) Trial home visits. A trial home visit may not exceed six months in duration, unless a court orders a longer trial home visit. If a trial home visit extends beyond six months and has not been authorized by the court, or exceeds the time period the court has deemed appropriate, and the child is subsequently returned to foster care, that placement must then be considered a new placement and title IV-E eligibility must be newly established. Under these circumstances the judicial determinations regarding contrary to the welfare and reasonable efforts to prevent removal are required.

(f) Case review system. In order to satisfy the provisions of section 471(a)(16) of the Act regarding a case review system, each title IV-E agency's case review system must meet the requirements of sections 475(5) and 475(6) of the Act.

(g) Case plan requirements. In order to satisfy the case plan requirements of sections 471(a)(16), 475(1) and 475(5)(A) and (D) of the Act, the title IV-E agency must promulgate policy materials and instructions for use by staff to determine the appropriateness of and necessity for the foster care placement of the child. The case plan for each child must:

(1) Be a written document, which is a discrete part of the case record, in a format determined by the title IV-E agency, which is developed jointly with the parent(s) or guardian of the child in foster care; and

(2) Be developed within a reasonable period, to be established by the title IV-E agency, but in no event later than 60 days from the child's removal from the home pursuant to paragraph (k) of this section;

(3) Include a discussion of how the case plan is designed to achieve a safe placement for the child in the least restrictive (most family-like) setting available and in close proximity to the home of the parent(s) when the case plan goal is reunification and a discussion of how the placement is consistent with the best interests and special needs of the child. (FFP is not available when a court orders a placement with a specific foster care provider);

(4) Include a description of the services offered and provided to prevent removal of the child from the home and to reunify the family; and

(5) Document the steps to finalize a placement when the case plan goal is or becomes adoption or placement in another permanent home in accordance with sections 475(1)(E) and (5)(E) of the Act. When the case plan goal is adoption, at a minimum, such documentation shall include child-specific recruitment efforts such as the use of State, Tribal, regional, and national adoption exchanges including electronic exchange systems.

(This requirement has been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under OMB Control Number 0980-0140. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number.)

(h) Application of the permanency hearing requirements. (1) To meet the requirements of the permanency hearing, the title IV-E agency must, among other requirements, comply with section 475(5)(C) of the Act.

(2) In accordance with paragraph (b)(3) of this section, when a court determines that reasonable efforts to return the child home are not required, a permanency hearing must be held within 30 days of that determination, unless the requirements of the permanency hearing are fulfilled at the hearing in which the court determines that reasonable efforts to reunify the child and family are not required.

(3) If the title IV-E agency concludes, after considering reunification, adoption, legal guardianship, or permanent placement with a fit and willing relative, that the most appropriate permanency plan for a child is placement in another planned permanent living arrangement, the title IV-E agency must document to the court the compelling reason for the alternate plan. Examples of a compelling reason for establishing such a permanency plan may include:

(i) The case of an older teen who specifically requests that emancipation be established as his/her permanency plan;

(ii) The case of a parent and child who have a significant bond but the parent is unable to care for the child because of an emotional or physical disability and the child's foster parents have committed to raising him/her to the age of majority and to facilitate visitation with the disabled parent; or,

(iii) the Tribe has identified another planned permanent living arrangement for the child.

(4) When an administrative body, appointed or approved by the court, conducts the permanency hearing, the procedural safeguards set forth in the definition of permanency hearing must be so extended by the administrative body.

(i) Application of the requirements for filing a petition to terminate parental rights at section 475(5)(E) of the Social Security Act. (1) Subject to the exceptions in paragraph (i)(2) of this section, the title IV-E agency must file a petition (or, if such a petition has been filed by another party, seek to be joined as a party to the petition) to terminate the parental rights of a parent(s):

(i) Whose child has been in foster care under the responsibility of the title IV-E agency for 15 of the most recent 22 months. The petition must be filed by the end of the child's fifteenth month in foster care. In calculating when to file a petition for termination of parental rights, the title IV-E agency:

(A) Must calculate the 15 out of the most recent 22 month period from the date the child is considered to have entered foster care as defined at section 475(5)(F) of the Act and §1355.20 of this part;

(B) Must use a cumulative method of calculation when a child experiences multiple exits from and entries into foster care during the 22 month period;

(C) Must not include trial home visits or runaway episodes in calculating 15 months in foster care; and,

(D) Need only apply section 475(5)(E) of the Act to a child once if the title IV-E agency does not file a petition because one of the exceptions at paragraph (i)(2) of this section applies;

(ii) Whose child has been determined by a court of competent jurisdiction to be an abandoned infant (as defined under State or for a Tribal title IV-E agency, Tribal law). The petition to terminate parental rights must be filed within 60 days of the judicial determination that the child is an abandoned infant; or,

(iii) Who has been convicted of one of the felonies listed at paragraph (b)(3)(ii) of this section. Under such circumstances, the petition to terminate parental rights must be filed within 60 days of a judicial determination that reasonable efforts to reunify the child and parent are not required.

(2) The title IV-E agency may elect not to file or join a petition to terminate the parental rights of a parent per paragraph (i)(1) of this section if:

(i) At the option of the title IV-E agency, the child is being cared for by a relative;

(ii) The title IV-E agency has documented in the case plan (which must be available for court review) a compelling reason for determining that filing such a petition would not be in the best interests of the individual child. Compelling reasons for not filing a petition to terminate parental rights include, but are not limited to:

(A) Adoption is not the appropriate permanency goal for the child; or,

(B) No grounds to file a petition to terminate parental rights exist; or,

(C) The child is an unaccompanied refugee minor as defined in 45 CFR 400.111; or

(D) There are international legal obligations or compelling foreign policy reasons that would preclude terminating parental rights; or

(iii) The title IV-E agency has not provided to the family, consistent with the time period in the case plan, services that the title IV-E agency deems necessary for the safe return of the child to the home, when reasonable efforts to reunify the family are required.

(3) When the title IV-E agency files or joins a petition to terminate parental rights in accordance with paragraph (i)(1) of this section, it must concurrently begin to identify, recruit, process, and approve a qualified adoptive family for the child.

(j) Child of a minor parent in foster care. Foster care maintenance payments made on behalf of a child placed in a foster family home or child care institution, who is the parent of a son or daughter in the same home or institution, must include amounts which are necessary to cover costs incurred on behalf of the child's son or daughter. Said costs must be limited to funds expended on items listed in the definition of foster care maintenance payments in §1355.20 of this part.

(k) Removal from the home of a specified relative. (1) For the purposes of meeting the requirements of section 472(a)(1) of the Act, a removal from the home must occur pursuant to:

(i) A voluntary placement agreement entered into by a parent or guardian which leads to a physical or constructive removal (i.e., a non-physical or paper removal of custody) of the child from the home; or

(ii) A judicial order for a physical or constructive removal of the child from a parent or specified relative.

(2) A removal has not occurred in situations where legal custody is removed from the parent or relative and the child remains with the same relative in that home under supervision by the title IV-E agency.

(3) A child is considered constructively removed on the date of the first judicial order removing custody, even temporarily, from the appropriate specified relative or the date that the voluntary placement agreement is signed by all relevant parties.

(l) Living with a specified relative. For purposes of meeting the requirements for living with a specified relative prior to removal from the home under section 472(a)(1) of the Act, all of the conditions under section 472(a)(3), and for Tribal title IV-E agencies section 479B(c)(1)(C)(ii)(II) of the Act, one of the two following situations must apply:

(1) The child was living with the parent or specified relative, and was AFDC eligible in that home in the month of the voluntary placement agreement or initiation of court proceedings; or

(2) The child had been living with the parent or specified relative within six months of the month of the voluntary placement agreement or the initiation of court proceedings, and the child would have been AFDC eligible in that month if s/he had still been living in that home.

(m) Review of payments and licensing standards. In meeting the requirements of section 471(a)(11) of the Act, the title IV-E agency must review at reasonable, specific, time-limited periods to be established by the agency:

(1) The amount of the payments made for foster care maintenance and adoption assistance to assure their continued appropriateness; and

(2) The licensing or approval standards for child care institutions and foster family homes.

(n) Foster care goals. The specific foster care goals required under section 471(a)(14) of the Act must be incorporated into State law or Tribal law by statute, code, resolution, Tribal proceedings or administrative regulation with the force of law.

(o) Notice and right to be heard. The title IV-E agency must provide the foster parent(s) of a child and any preadoptive parent or relative providing care for the child with timely notice of and the opportunity to be heard in any proceedings held with respect to the child during the time the child is in the care of such foster parent, preadoptive parent, or relative caregiver. Notice of and opportunity to be heard does not include the right to standing as a party to the case.

[65 FR 4088, Jan. 25, 2000, as amended at 66 FR 58677, Nov. 23, 2001; 77 FR 947, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§1356.22   Implementation requirements for children voluntarily placed in foster care.

(a) As a condition of receipt of Federal financial participation (FFP) in foster care maintenance payments for a dependent child removed from his home under a voluntary placement agreement, the title IV-E agency must meet the requirements of:

(1) Section 472 of the Act, as amended;

(2) Sections 422(b)(8) and 475(5) of the Act;

(3) 45 CFR 1356.21(e), (f), (g), (h), and (i); and

(4) The requirements of this section.

(b) Federal financial participation is available only for voluntary foster care maintenance expenditures made within the first 180 days of the child's placement in foster care unless there has been a judicial determination by a court of competent jurisdiction, within the first 180 days of such placement, to the effect that the continued voluntary placement is in the best interests of the child.

(c) The title IV-E agency must establish and maintain a uniform procedure or system, consistent with State or Tribal law, for revocation by the parent(s) of a voluntary placement agreement and return of the child.

[65 FR 4090, Jan. 25, 2000, as amended at 66 FR 58677, Nov. 23, 2001; 77 FR 949, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§1356.30   Safety requirements for foster care and adoptive home providers.

(a) The title IV-E agency must provide documentation that criminal records checks have been conducted with respect to prospective foster and adoptive parents.

(b) The title IV-E agency may not approve or license any prospective foster or adoptive parent, nor may the title IV-E agency claim FFP for any foster care maintenance or adoption assistance payment made on behalf of a child placed in a foster home operated under the auspices of a child placing agency or on behalf of a child placed in an adoptive home through a private adoption agency, if the title IV-E agency finds that, based on a criminal records check conducted in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section, a court of competent jurisdiction has determined that the prospective foster or adoptive parent has been convicted of a felony involving:

(1) Child abuse or neglect;

(2) Spousal abuse;

(3) A crime against a child or children (including child pornography); or,

(4) A crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault, or homicide, but not including other physical assault or battery.

(c) The title IV-E agency may not approve or license any prospective foster or adoptive parent, nor may the title IV-E agency claim FFP for any foster care maintenance or adoption assistance payment made on behalf of a child placed in a foster home operated under the auspices of a child placing agency or on behalf of a child placed in an adoptive home through a private adoption agency, if the title IV-E agency finds, based on a criminal records check conducted in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section, that a court of competent jurisdiction has determined that the prospective foster or adoptive parent has, within the last five years, been convicted of a felony involving:

(1) Physical assault;

(2) Battery; or,

(3) A drug-related offense.

(d) [Reserved]

(e) In all cases where the State opted out of the criminal records check requirement, as permitted prior to the amendments made by section 152 of Public Law 109-248, the licensing file for that foster or adoptive family must contain documentation which verifies that safety considerations with respect to the caretaker(s) have been addressed.

(f) In order for a child care institution to be eligible for title IV-E funding, the licensing file for the institution must contain documentation which verifies that safety considerations with respect to the staff of the institution have been addressed.

[65 FR 4090, Jan. 25, 2000, as amended at 77 FR 949, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§1356.40   Adoption assistance program: Administrative requirements to implement section 473 of the Act.

(a) To implement the adoption assistance program provisions of the title IV-E plan and to be eligible for Federal financial participation in adoption assistance payments under this part, the title IV-E agency must meet the requirements of this section and section 471(a), applicable provisions of section 473, and section 475(3) of the Act.

(b) The adoption assistance agreement for payments pursuant to section 473(a)(2) must meet the requirements of section 475(3) of the Act and must:

(1) Be signed and in effect at the time of or prior to the final decree of adoption. A copy of the signed agreement must be given to each party; and

(2) Specify its duration; and

(3) Specify the nature and amount of any payment, services and assistance to be provided under such agreement and, for purposes of eligibility under title XIX of the Act, specify that the child is eligible for Medicaid services; and

(4) Specify, with respect to agreements entered into on or after October 1, 1983, that the agreement shall remain in effect regardless of the place of residence of the adoptive parents at any given time.

(c) There must be no income eligibility requirement (means test) for the prospective adoptive parent(s) in determining eligibility for adoption assistance payments.

(d) In the event an adoptive family moves from one place of residence to another, the family may apply for social services on behalf of the adoptive child in the new place of residence. If a needed service(s) specified in the adoption assistance agreement is not available in the new place of residence, the title IV-E agency making the original adoption assistance payment remains financially responsible for providing the specified service(s).

(e) A title IV-E agency may make an adoption assistance agreement with adopting parent(s) who reside in another State or a Tribal service area. If so, all provisions of this section apply.

(f) The title IV-E agency must actively seek ways to promote the adoption assistance program.

[48 FR 23116, May 23, 1983, as amended at 53 FR 50220, Dec. 14, 1988; 77 FR 949, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§1356.41   Nonrecurring expenses of adoption.

(a) The amount of the payment made for nonrecurring expenses of adoption shall be determined through agreement between the adopting parent(s) and the title IV-E agency administering the program. The agreement must indicate the nature and amount of the nonrecurring expenses to be paid.

(b) The agreement for nonrecurring expenses may be a separate document or a part of an agreement for either State, Tribal, or Federal adoption assistance payments or services.

(c) There must be no income eligibility requirement (means test) for adopting parents in determining whether payments for nonrecurring expenses of adoption shall be made. However, parents cannot be reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses for which they have otherwise been reimbursed.

(d) For purposes of payment of nonrecurring expenses of adoption, the title IV-E agency must determine that the child is a “child with special needs” as defined in section 473(c) of the Act, and that the child has been placed for adoption in accordance with applicable laws; the child need not meet the categorical eligibility requirements at section 473(a)(2).

(e)(1) The title IV-E agency must notify all appropriate courts and all public and licensed private nonprofit adoption agencies of the availability of funds for the nonrecurring expenses of adoption of children with special needs as well as where and how interested persons may apply for these funds. This information should routinely be made available to all persons who inquire about adoption services.

(2) The agreement for nonrecurring expenses must be signed at the time of or prior to the final decree of adoption. Claims must be filed with the title IV-E agency within two years of the date of the final decree of adoption.

(f)(1) Funds expended by the title IV-E agency under an adoption assistance agreement, with respect to nonrecurring adoption expenses incurred by or on behalf of parents who adopt a child with special needs, shall be considered an administrative expenditure of the title IV-E Adoption Assistance Program. Federal reimbursement is available at a 50 percent matching rate, for title IV-E agency expenditures up to $2,000, for any adoptive placement.

(2) Title IV-E agencies may set a reasonable lower maximum which must be based on reasonable charges, consistent with State, Tribal, and local practices, for special needs adoptions within the State or Tribal service area. The basis for setting a lower maximum must be documented and available for public inspection.

(3) In cases where siblings are placed and adopted, either separately or as a unit, each child is treated as an individual with separate reimbursement for nonrecurring expenses up to the maximum amount allowable for each child.

(g) Federal financial participation for nonrecurring expenses of adoption is limited to costs incurred by or on behalf of adoptive parents that are not otherwise reimbursed from other sources. Payments for nonrecurring expenses shall be made either directly by the title IV-E agency or through another public or licensed nonprofit private agency.

(h) When the adoption of the child involves a placement outside the State or Tribal service area, the title IV-E agency that enters into an adoption assistance agreement under section 473(a)(1)(B)(ii) of the Act or under a State or Tribal subsidy program will be responsible for paying the nonrecurring adoption expenses of the child. In cases where there is placement outside the State or Tribal service area but no agreement for other Federal, Tribal, or State adoption assistance, the title IV-E agency in the jurisdiction in which the final adoption decree is issued will be responsible for reimbursement of nonrecurring expenses if the child meets the requirements of section 473(c).

(i) The term “nonrecurring adoption expenses” means reasonable and necessary adoption fees, court costs, attorney fees and other expenses which are directly related to the legal adoption of a child with special needs, which are not incurred in violation of State, Tribal or Federal law, and which have not been reimbursed from other sources or other funds. “Other expenses which are directly related to the legal adoption of a child with special needs” means the costs of the adoption incurred by or on behalf of the parents and for which parents carry the ultimate liability for payment. Such costs may include the adoption study, including health and psychological examination, supervision of the placement prior to adoption, transportation and the reasonable costs of lodging and food for the child and/or the adoptive parents when necessary to complete the placement or adoption process.

(j) Failure to honor all eligible claims will be considered non-compliance by the title IV-E agency with title IV-E of the Act.

(k) A title IV-E expenditure is considered made in the quarter during which the payment was made by a title IV-E agency to a private nonprofit agency, individual or vendor payee.

[53 FR 50220, Dec. 14, 1988, as amended at 77 FR 949, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§1356.50   Withholding of funds for non-compliance with the approved title IV-E plan.

(a) To be in compliance with the title IV-E plan requirements, a title IV-E agency must meet the requirements of the Act and 45 CFR 1356.20, 1356.21, 1356.30, and 1356.40 of this part.

(b) To be in compliance with the title IV-E plan requirements, a title IV-E agency that chooses to claim FFP for voluntary placements must meet the requirements of the Act, 45 CFR 1356.22 and paragraph (a) of this section; and

(c) For purposes of this section, the procedures in §1355.39 of this chapter apply.

[48 FR 23117, May 23, 1983, as amended at 65 FR 4091, Jan. 25, 2000; 66 FR 58677, Nov. 23, 2001; 77 FR 950, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§1356.60   Fiscal requirements (title IV-E).

(a) Federal matching funds for foster care maintenance and adoption assistance payments. (1) Effective October 1, 1980, Federal financial participation (FFP) is available to States under an approved title IV-E State plan for allowable costs in expenditures for:

(1) Federal financial participation (FFP) is available to title IV-E agencies under an approved title IV-E plan for allowable costs in expenditures for:

(i) Foster care maintenance payments as defined in section 475(4) of the Act, made in accordance with 45 CFR 1356.20 through 1356.30, section 472 of the Act, and for a Tribal title IV-E agency, section 479B of the Act;

(ii) Adoption assistance payments made in accordance with 45 CFR 1356.20 and 1356.40, applicable provisions of section 473, section 475(3) and, for a Tribal title IV-E agency, section 479B of the Act.

(2) Federal financial participation is available at the rate of the Federal medical assistance percentage as defined in section 1905(b), 474(a)(1) and (2) and 479B(d) of the Act as applicable, definitions, and pertinent regulations as promulgated by the Secretary, or his designee.

(b) Federal matching funds for title IV-E agency training for foster care and adoption assistance under title IV-E. (1) Federal financial participation is available at the rate of seventy-five percent (75%) in the costs of:

(i) Training personnel employed or preparing for employment by the title IV-E agency administering the plan, and;

(ii) Providing short-term training (including travel and per diem expenses) to current or prospective foster or adoptive parents and the members of the state licensed or approved child care institutions providing care to foster and adopted children receiving title IV-E assistance.

(2) All training activities and costs funded under title IV-E shall be included in the agency's training plan for title IV-B.

(3) Short and long term training at educational institutions and in-service training may be provided in accordance with the provisions of §§235.63 through 235.66(a) of this title.

(c) Federal matching funds for other title IV-E agency administrative expenditures for foster care and adoption assistance under title IV-E. Federal financial participation is available at the rate of fifty percent (50%) for administrative expenditures necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the title IV-E plan. The State's cost allocation plan shall identify which costs are allocated and claimed under this program.

(1) The determination and redetermination of eligibility, fair hearings and appeals, rate setting and other costs directly related only to the administration of the foster care program under this part are deemed allowable administrative costs under this paragraph. They may not be claimed under any other section or Federal program.

(2) The following are examples of allowable administrative costs necessary for the administration of the foster care program:

(i) Referral to services;

(ii) Preparation for and participation in judicial determinations;

(iii) Placement of the child;

(iv) Development of the case plan;

(v) Case reviews;

(vi) Case management and supervision;

(vii) Recruitment and licensing of foster homes and institutions;

(viii) Rate setting; and

(ix) A proportionate share of related agency overhead.

(x) Costs related to data collection and reporting.

(3) Allowable administrative costs do not include the costs of social services provided to the child, the child's family or foster family which provide counseling or treatment to ameliorate or remedy personal problems, behaviors or home conditions.

(d) Cost of the data collection system. (1) Costs related to data collection system initiation, implementation and operation may be charged as an administrative cost of title IV-E at the 50 percent matching rate subject to the restrictions in paragraph (d) (2) of this section

(2) For information systems used for purposes other than those specified by section 479 of the Act, costs must be allocated and must bear the same ratio as the foster care and adoption population bears to the total population contained in the information system as verified by reports from all other programs included in the system.

(e) Federal matching funds for CCWIS and Non-CCWIS. Federal matching funds are available at the rate of fifty percent (50%). Requirements for the cost allocation of CCWIS and non-CCWIS project costs are at §1355.57 of this chapter.

[47 FR 30925, July 15, 1982, as amended at 48 FR 23117, May 23, 1983; 53 FR 50221, Dec. 14, 1988; 58 FR 67938, 67947, Dec. 22, 1993; 65 FR 4091, Jan. 25, 2000; 66 FR 58677, Nov. 23, 2001; 77 FR 950, Jan. 6, 2012; 81 FR 35482, June 2, 2016]

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§§1356.65-1356.66   [Reserved]

§1356.67   Procedures for the transfer of placement and care responsibility of a child from a State to a Tribal title IV-E agency or an Indian Tribe with a title IV-E agreement.

(a) Each State with a title IV-E plan approved under section 471 of the Act must establish and maintain procedures, in consultation with Indian Tribes, for the transfer of responsibility for the placement and care of a child under a State title IV-E plan to a Tribal title IV-E agency or an Indian Tribe with a title IV-E agreement in a way that does not affect a child's eligibility for, or payment of, title IV-E and the child's eligibility for medical assistance under title XIX of the Act.

(b) The procedures must, at a minimum, provide for the State to:

(1) Determine, if the eligibility determination is not already completed, the child's eligibility under section 472 or 473 of the Act at the time of the transfer of placement and care responsibility of a child to a Tribal title IV-E agency or an Indian Tribe with a title IV-E agreement.

(2) Provide essential documents and information necessary to continue a child's eligibility under title IV-E and Medicaid programs under title XIX to the Tribal title IV-E agency, including, but not limited to providing:

(i) All judicial determinations to the effect that continuation in the home from which the child was removed would be contrary to the welfare of the child and that reasonable efforts described in section 471(a)(15) of the Act have been made;

(ii) Other documentation the State has that relates to the child's title IV-E eligibility under sections 472 and 473 of the Act;

(iii) Information and documentation available to the agency regarding the child's eligibility or potential eligibility for other Federal benefits;

(iv) The case plan developed pursuant to section 475(1) of the Act, including health and education records of the child pursuant to section 475(1)(C) of the Act; and

(v) Information and documentation of the child's placement settings, including a copy of the most recent provider's license or approval.

[77 FR 950, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§1356.68   Tribal title IV-E agency requirements for in-kind administrative and training contributions from third-party sources.

(a) Option to claim in-kind expenditures from third-party sources for non-Federal share of administrative and training costs. A Tribal title IV-E agency may claim allowable in-kind expenditures from third-party sources for the purpose of determining the non-Federal share of administrative or training costs subject to paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section.

(b) In-kind expenditures for fiscal years 2010 and 2011—(1) Administrative costs. A Tribal title IV-E agency may claim allowable in-kind expenditures from third-party sources of up to 25 percent of the total administrative funds expended during a fiscal quarter pursuant to section 474(a)(3)(C), (D) or (E) of the Act.

(2) Training costs. A Tribal title IV-E agency may claim in-kind training expenditures of up to 12 percent of the total training funds expended during a fiscal year quarter pursuant to section 474(a)(3)(A) and (B) of the Act, but only from the following sources:

(i) A State or local government;

(ii) An Indian Tribe, Tribal organization, or Tribal consortium other than the Indian Tribe, organization, or consortium submitting the title IV-E plan;

(iii) A public institution of higher education;

(iv) A Tribal College or University (as defined in section 316 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1059c)); and

(v) A private charitable organization.

(c) In-kind expenditures for fiscal years 2012 and thereafter—(1) Administrative costs. A Tribal title IV-E agency may claim in-kind expenditures from third-party sources of up to 50 percent of the total administrative funds expended during a fiscal quarter pursuant to section 474(a)(3)(C), (D) or (E) of the Act.

(2) Training costs. A Tribal title IV-E agency may claim in-kind training expenditures of up to 25 percent (or 30 percent consistent with section 203(b) of Pub. L. 110-351) of the total training funds expended during each quarter of fiscal year 2012 pursuant to section 474(a)(3)(A) and (B) of the Act. For fiscal year 2013 and thereafter, a Tribal title IV-E agency may claim in-kind training expenditures of up to 25 percent of the total training funds expended during a fiscal quarter pursuant to section 474(a)(3)(A) and (B) of the Act.

(3) Third-party sources. A Tribal title IV-E agency may claim in-kind training expenditures for training funds from any allowable third-party source.

[77 FR 950, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§§1356.69-1356.70   [Reserved]

§1356.71   Federal review of the eligibility of children in foster care and the eligibility of foster care providers in title IV-E programs.

(a) Purpose, scope and overview of the process. (1) This section sets forth requirements governing Federal reviews of compliance with the title IV-E eligibility provisions as they apply to children and foster care providers under paragraphs (a) and (b) of section 472 of the Act.

(2) The requirements of this section apply to title IV-E agencies that receive Federal payments for foster care under title IV-E of the Act.

(3) The review process begins with a primary review of foster care cases for the title IV-E eligibility requirements.

(i) Title IV-E agencies in substantial compliance. Title IV-E agencies determined to be in substantial compliance based on the primary review will be subject to another review in three years.

(ii) Title IV-E agencies not in substantial compliance. Title IV-E agencies that are determined not to be in substantial compliance based on the primary review will develop and implement a program improvement plan designed to correct the areas of noncompliance. A secondary review will be conducted after the completion of the program improvement plan. A subsequent primary review will be held three years from the date of the secondary review.

(b) Composition of review team and preliminary activities preceding an on-site review. (1) The review team must be composed of representatives of the title IV-E agency, and ACF's Regional and Central Offices.

(2) The title IV-E agency must provide ACF with the complete payment history for each of the sample and oversample cases prior to the on-site review.

(c) Sampling guidance and conduct of review. (1) The list of sampling units in the target population (i.e., the sampling frame) will be drawn by ACF statistical staff from the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS) data which are transmitted by the title IV-E agency to ACF. The sampling frame will consist of cases of children who were eligible for foster care maintenance payments during the reporting period reflected in a title IV-E agency's most recent AFCARS data submission. For the initial primary review, if these data are not available or are deficient, an alternative sampling frame, consistent with one AFCARS six-month reporting period, will be selected by ACF in conjunction with the title IV-E agency.

(2) A sample of 80 cases (plus a 10 percent oversample of eight cases) from the title IV-E foster care program will be selected for the primary review utilizing probability sampling methodologies. Usually, the chosen methodology will be simple random sampling, but other probability samples may be utilized, when necessary and appropriate.

(3) Cases from the oversample will be substituted and reviewed for each of the original sample of 80 cases which is found to be in error.

(4) At the completion of the primary review, the review team will determine the number of ineligible cases. When the total number of ineligible cases does not exceed eight, ACF can conclude with a probability of 88 percent that in a population of 1000 or more cases the population ineligibility case error rate is less than 15 percent and the title IV-E agency will be considered in substantial compliance.For primary reviews held subsequent to the initial primary reviews, the acceptable population ineligibility case error rate threshold will be reduced from less than 15 percent (eight or fewer ineligible cases) to less than 10 percent (four or fewer ineligible cases)). A title IV-E agency which meets this standard is considered to be in “substantial compliance” (see paragraph (h) of this section). A disallowance will be assessed for the ineligible cases for the period of time the cases are ineligible.

(5) A title IV-E agency which has been determined to be in “noncompliance” (i.e., not in substantial compliance) will be required to develop a program improvement plan according to the specifications discussed in paragraph (i) of this section, as well as undergo a secondary review. For the secondary review, a sample of 150 cases (plus a 10 percent oversample of 15 cases) will be drawn from the most recent AFCARS submission. Usually, the chosen methodology will be simple random sampling, but other probability samples may be utilized, when necessary and appropriate. Cases from the oversample will be substituted and reviewed for each of the original sample of 150 cases which is found to be in error.

(6) At the completion of the secondary review, the review team will calculate both the sample case ineligibility and dollar error rates for the cases determined ineligible during the review. An extrapolated disallowance equal to the lower limit of a 90 percent confidence interval for the population total dollars in error for the amount of time corresponding to the AFCARS reporting period will be assessed if both the child/provider (case) ineligibility and dollar error rates exceed 10 percent. If neither, or only one, of the error rates exceeds 10 percent, a disallowance will be assessed for the ineligible cases for the period of time the cases are ineligible.

(d) Requirements subject to review. Title IV-E agencies will be reviewed against the requirements of title IV-E of the Act regarding:

(1) The eligibility of the children on whose behalf the foster care maintenance payments are made (section 472(a)(1)-(4) of the Act) to include:

(i) Judicial determinations regarding “reasonable efforts” and “contrary to the welfare” in accordance with §1356.21(b) and (c), respectively;

(ii) Voluntary placement agreements in accordance with §1356.22;

(iii) Responsibility for placement and care vested with the title IV-E or other public agency per section 472(a)(2)(B) of the Act;

(iv) Placement in a licensed foster family home or child care institution; and,

(v) Eligibility for AFDC under such State plan as it was in effect on July 16, 1996 per section 472(a)(3) or 479B(c)(1)(C)(ii)(II) of the Act, as appropriate.

(2) Allowable payments made to foster care providers who comport with sections 471(a)(10), 471(a)(20), 472(b) and (c), and 479B(c)(2) of the Act and §1356.30.

(e) Review instrument. A title IV-E foster care eligibility review checklist will be used when conducting the eligibility review.

(f) Eligibility determination—child. The case record of the child must contain sufficient documentation to verify a child's eligibility in accordance with paragraph (d)(1) of this section, in order to substantiate payments made on the child's behalf.

(g) Eligibility determination—provider. (1) For each case being reviewed, the title IV-E agency must make available a licensing file which contains the licensing history, including a copy of the certificate of licensure/approval or letter of approval, for each of the providers in the following categories:

(i) Public child care institutions with 25 children or less in residence;

(ii) Private child care institutions;

(iii) Group homes; and

(iv) Foster family homes, including relative homes.

(2) The licensing file must contain documentation that the title IV-E agency has complied with the safety requirements for foster and adoptive placements in accordance with §1356.30.

(3) If the licensing file does not contain sufficient information to support a child's placement in a licensed facility, the title IV-E agency may provide supplemental information from other sources (e.g., a computerized database).

(h) Standards of compliance. (1) Disallowances will be taken, and plans for program improvement required, based on the extent to which a title IV-E agency is not in substantial compliance with recipient or provider eligibility provisions of title IV-E, or applicable regulations in 45 CFR parts 1355 and 1356.

(2) Substantial compliance and noncompliance are defined as follows:

(i) Substantial compliance—For the primary review (of the sample of 80 cases), no more than eight of the title IV-E cases reviewed may be determined to be ineligible. (This critical number of allowable “errors,” i.e., ineligible cases, is reduced to four errors or less in primary reviews held subsequent to the initial primary review). For the secondary review (if required), substantial compliance means either the case ineligibility or dollar error rate does not exceed 10 percent.

(ii) Noncompliance—means not in substantial compliance. For the primary review (of the sample of 80 cases), nine or more of the title IV-E cases reviewed must be determined to be ineligible. (This critical number of allowable “errors,” i.e., ineligible cases, is reduced to five or more in primary reviews subsequent to the initial primary review). For the secondary review (if required), noncompliance means both the case ineligibility and dollar error rates exceed 10 percent.

(3) ACF will notify the title IV-E agency in writing within 30 calendar days after the completion of the review of whether the title IV-E agency is, or is not, operating in substantial compliance.

(4) Title IV-E agencies which are determined to be in substantial compliance must undergo a subsequent review after a minimum of three years.

(i) Program improvement plans. (1) Title IV-E agencies which are determined to be in noncompliance with recipient or provider eligibility provisions of title IV-E, or applicable regulations in 45 CFR Parts 1355 and 1356, will develop a program improvement plan designed to correct the areas determined not to be in substantial compliance. The program improvement plan will:

(i) Be developed jointly by title IV-E agency and Federal staff;

(ii) Identify the areas in which the title IV-E agency's program is not in substantial compliance;

(iii) Not extend beyond one year. A title IV-E agency will have a maximum of one year in which to implement and complete the provisions of the program improvement plan unless State/Tribal legislative action is required. In such instances, an extension may be granted with the title IV-E agency and ACF negotiating the terms and length of such extension that shall not exceed the last day of the first legislative session after the date of the program improvement plan; and

(iv) Include:

(A) Specific goals;

(B) The action steps required to correct each identified weakness or deficiency; and,

(C) a date by which each of the action steps is to be completed.

(2) Title IV-E agencies determined not to be in substantial compliance as a result of a primary review must submit the program improvement plan to ACF for approval within 90 calendar days from the date the title IV-E agency receives written notification that it is not in substantial compliance. This deadline may be extended an additional 30 calendar days when a title IV-E agency submits additional documentation to ACF in support of cases determined to be ineligible as a result of the on-site eligibility review.

(3) The ACF Regional Office will intermittently review, in conjunction with the title IV-E agency, the title IV-E agency's progress in completing the prescribed action steps in the program improvement plan.

(4) If a title IV-E agency does not submit an approvable program improvement plan in accordance with the provisions of paragraphs (i)(1) and (2) of this section, ACF will move to a secondary review in accordance with paragraph (c) of this section.

(j) Disallowance of funds. The amount of funds to be disallowed will be determined by the extent to which a title IV-E agency is not in substantial compliance with recipient or provider eligibility provisions of title IV-E, or applicable regulations in 45 CFR parts 1355 and 1356.

(1) Title IV-E agencies which are found to be in substantial compliance during the primary or secondary review will have disallowances (if any) determined on the basis of individual cases reviewed and found to be in error. The amount of disallowance will be computed on the basis of payments associated with ineligible cases for the entire period of time that each case has been ineligible.

(2) Title IV-E agencies which are found to be in noncompliance during the primary review will have disallowances determined on the basis of individual cases reviewed and found to be in error, and must implement a program improvement plan in accordance with the provisions contained within it. A secondary review will be conducted no later than during the AFCARS reporting period which immediately follows the program improvement plan completion date on a sample of 150 cases drawn from the title IV-E agency's most recent AFCARS data. If both the case ineligibility and dollar error rates exceed 10 percent, the title IV-E agency is not in compliance and an additional disallowance will be determined based on extrapolation from the sample to the universe of claims paid for the duration of the AFCARS reporting period (i.e., all title IV-E funds expended for a case during the quarter(s) that case is ineligible, including administrative costs). If either the case ineligibility or dollar rate does not exceed 10 percent, the amount of disallowance will be computed on the basis of payments associated with ineligible cases for the entire period of time the case has been determined to be ineligible.

(3) The title IV-E agency will be liable for interest on the amount of funds disallowed by the Department, in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR 30.18.

(4) Title IV-E agencies may appeal any disallowance actions taken by ACF to the HHS Departmental Appeals Board in accordance with regulations at 45 CFR part 16.

[65 FR 4091, Jan. 25, 2000, as amended at 66 FR 58677, Nov. 23, 2001; 77 FR 951, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§1356.80   Scope of the National Youth in Transition Database.

The requirements of the National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) §§1356.81 through 1356.86 of this part apply to the agency in any State, the District of Columbia, or Territory, that administers, or supervises the administration of the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (CFCIP) under section 477 of the Social Security Act (the Act).

[73 FR 10365, Feb. 26, 2008]

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§1356.81   Reporting population.

The reporting population is comprised of all youth in the following categories:

(a) Served population. Each youth who receives an independent living service paid for or provided by the State agency during the reporting period.

(b) Baseline population. Each youth who is in foster care as defined in 45 CFR 1355.20 and reaches his or her 17th birthday during Federal fiscal year (FFY) 2011, and such youth who reach a 17th birthday during every third year thereafter.

(c) Follow-up population. Each youth who reaches his or her 19th or 21st birthday in a Federal fiscal year and had participated in data collection as part of the baseline population, as specified in section 1356.82(a)(2) of this part. A youth has participated in the outcomes data collection if the State agency reports to ACF a valid response (i.e., a response option other than “declined” and “not applicable”) to any of the outcomes-related elements described in section 1356.83(g)(37) through (g)(58) of this part.

[73 FR 10365, Feb. 26, 2008]

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§1356.82   Data collection requirements.

(a) The State agency must collect applicable information as specified in section 1356.83 of this part on the reporting population defined in section 1356.81 of this part in accordance with the following:

(1) For each youth in the served population, the State agency must collect information for the data elements specified in section 1356.83(b) and 1356.83(c) of this part on an ongoing basis, for as long as the youth receives services.

(2) For each youth in the baseline population, the State agency must collect information for the data elements specified in section 1356.83(b) and 1356.83(d) of this part. The State agency must collect this information on a new baseline population every three years.

(i) For each youth in foster care who turns age 17 in FFY 2011, the State agency must collect this information within 45 days following the youth's 17th birthday, but not before that birthday.

(ii) Every third Federal fiscal year thereafter, the State agency must collect this information on each youth in foster care who turns age 17 during the year within 45 days following the youth's 17th birthday, but not before that birthday.

(iii) The State agency must collect this information using the survey questions in appendix B of this part entitled “Information to collect from all youth surveyed for outcomes, whether in foster care or not.”

(3) For each youth in the follow-up population, the State agency must collect information on the data elements specified in sections 1356.83(b) and 1356.83(e) of this part within the reporting period of the youth's 19th and 21st birthday. The State agency must collect the information using the appropriate survey questions in appendix B of this part, depending upon whether the youth is in foster care.

(b) The State agency may select a sample of the 17-year-olds in the baseline population to follow over time consistent with the sampling requirements described in section 1356.84 of this part to satisfy the data collection requirements in paragraph (a)(3) of this section for the follow-up population. A State that samples must identify the youth at age 19 who participated in the outcomes data collection as part of the baseline population at age 17 who are not in the sample in accordance with 45 CFR 1356.83(e).

[73 FR 10365, Feb. 26, 2008]

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§1356.83   Reporting requirements and data elements.

(a) Reporting periods and deadlines. The six-month reporting periods are from October 1 to March 31 and April 1 to September 30. The State agency must submit data files that include the information specified in this section to ACF on a semi-annual basis, within 45 days of the end of the reporting period (i.e., by May 15 and November 14).

(b) Data elements for all youth. The State agency must report the data elements described in paragraphs (g)(1) through (g)(13) of this section for each youth in the entire reporting population defined in section 1356.81 of this part.

(c) Data elements for served youth. The State agency must report the data elements described in paragraphs (g)(14) through (g)(33) of this section for each youth in the served population defined in section 1356.81(a) of this part.

(d) Data elements for baseline youth. The State agency must report the data elements described in paragraphs (g)(34) through (g)(58) of this section for each youth in the baseline population defined in section 1356.81(b) of this part.

(e) Data elements for follow-up youth. The State agency must report the data elements described in paragraphs (g)(34) through (g)(58) of this section for each youth in the follow-up population defined in section 1356.81(c) of this part or alternatively, for each youth selected in accordance with the sampling procedures in section 1356.84 of this part. A State that samples must identify in the outcomes reporting status element described in paragraph (g)(34), the 19-year-old youth who participated in the outcomes data collection as a part of the baseline population at age 17, who are not in the sample.

(f) Single youth record. The State agency must report all applicable data elements for an individual youth in one record per reporting period.

(g) Data element descriptions. For each element described in paragraphs (g)(1) through (58) of this section, the State agency must indicate the applicable response as instructed.

(1) State. State means the State responsible for reporting on the youth. Indicate the first two digits of the State's Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) code for the State submitting the report to ACF.

(2) Report date. The report date corresponds with the end of the current reporting period. Indicate the last month and the year of the reporting period.

(3) Record number. The record number is the encrypted, unique person identification number for the youth. The State agency must apply and retain the same encryption routine or method for the person identification number across all reporting periods. The record number must be encrypted in accordance with ACF standards. Indicate the record number for the youth.

(i) If the youth is in foster care as defined in 45 CFR 1355.20 or was during the current or previous reporting period, the State agency must use and report to the NYTD the same person identification number for the youth the State agency reports to AFCARS. The person identification number must remain the same for the youth wherever the youth is living and in any subsequent NYTD reports.

(ii) If the youth was never in the State's foster care system as defined in 45 CFR 1355.20, the State agency must assign a person identification number that must remain the same for the youth wherever the youth is living and in any subsequent reports to NYTD.

(4) Date of birth. The youth's date of birth. Indicate the year, month, and day of the youth's birth.

(5) Sex. The youth's sex. Indicate whether the youth is male or female as appropriate.

(6) Race: American Indian or Alaska Native. In general, a youth's race is determined by the youth or the youth's parent(s). An American Indian or Alaska Native youth has origins in any of the original peoples of North or South America (including Central America), and maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. Indicate whether this racial category applies for the youth, with a “yes” or “no.”

(7) Race: Asian. In general, a youth's race is determined by the youth or the youth's parent(s). An Asian youth has origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. Indicate whether this racial category applies for the youth, with a “yes” or “no.”

(8) Race: Black or African American. In general, a youth's race is determined by the youth or the youth's parent(s). A Black or African American youth has origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Indicate whether this racial category applies for the youth, with a “yes” or “no.”

(9) Race: Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. In general, a youth's race is determined by the youth or the youth's parent(s). A Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander youth has origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. Indicate whether this racial category applies for the youth, with a “yes” or “no.”

(10) Race: White. In general, a youth's race is determined by the youth or the youth's parent(s). A White youth has origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. Indicate whether this racial category applies for the youth, with a “yes” or “no.”

(11) Race: unknown. The race, or at least one race of the youth is unknown, or the youth and/or parent is not able to communicate the youth's race. Indicate whether this category applies for the youth, with a “yes” or “no.”

(12) Race: declined. The youth or parent has declined to identify a race. Indicate whether this category applies for the youth, with a “yes” or “no.”

(13) Hispanic or Latino ethnicity. In general, a youth's ethnicity is determined by the youth or the youth's parent(s). A youth is of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity if the youth is a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race. Indicate which category applies, with “yes,” “no,” “unknown” or “declined,” as appropriate. “Unknown” means that the youth and/or parent is unable to communicate the youth's ethnicity. “Declined” means that the youth or parent has declined to identify the youth's Hispanic or Latino ethnicity.

(14) Foster care status—services. The youth receiving services is or was in foster care during the reporting period if the youth is or was in the placement and care responsibility of the State title IV-B/IV-E agency in accordance with the definition of foster care in 45 CFR 1355.20. Indicate whether the youth is or was in foster care at any point during the reporting period, with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(15) Local agency. The local agency is the county or equivalent jurisdictional unit that has primary responsibility for placement and care of a youth who is in foster care consistent with the definition in 45 CFR 1355.20, or that has primary responsibility for providing services to a youth who is not in foster care. Indicate the five-digit Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) code(s) that corresponds to the identity of the county or equivalent unit jurisdiction(s) that meets these criteria during the reporting period. If a youth who is not in foster care is provided services by a centralized unit only, rather than a county agency, indicate “centralized unit.” If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(16) Federally recognized tribe. The youth is enrolled in or eligible for membership in a federally recognized tribe. The term “federally recognized tribe” means any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community of Indians, including any Alaska Native village or regional or village corporation, as defined in or established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C 1601 et seq.), that is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians pursuant to the Indian Self-Determination and Educational Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450 et seq.). Indicate “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(17) Adjudicated delinquent. Adjudicated delinquent means that a State or Federal court of competent jurisdiction has adjudicated the youth as a delinquent. Indicate “yes,” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(18) Educational level. Educational level means the highest educational level completed by the youth. For example, for a youth currently in 11th grade, “10th grade” is the highest educational level completed. Post-secondary education or training refers to any post-secondary education or training, other than an education pursued at a college or university. College refers to completing at least a semester of study at a college or university. Indicate the highest educational level completed by the youth during the reporting period. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(19) Special education. The term “special education,” means specifically designed instruction, at no cost to parents, to meet the unique needs of a child with a disability. Indicate whether the youth has received special education instruction during the reporting period with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(20) Independent living needs assessment. An independent living needs assessment is a systematic procedure to identify a youth's basic skills, emotional and social capabilities, strengths, and needs to match the youth with appropriate independent living services. An independent living needs assessment may address knowledge of basic living skills, job readiness, money management abilities, decision-making skills, goal setting, task completion, and transitional living needs. Indicate whether the youth received an independent living needs assessment that was paid for or provided by the State agency during the reporting period with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(21) Academic support. Academic supports are services designed to help a youth complete high school or obtain a General Equivalency Degree (GED). Such services include the following: Academic counseling; preparation for a GED, including assistance in applying for or studying for a GED exam; tutoring; help with homework; study skills training; literacy training; and help accessing educational resources. Academic support does not include a youth's general attendance in high school. Indicate whether the youth received academic supports during the reporting period that were paid for or provided by the State agency with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(22) Post-secondary educational support. Post-secondary educational support are services designed to help a youth enter or complete a post-secondary education and include the following: Classes for test preparation, such as the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT); counseling about college; information about financial aid and scholarships; help completing college or loan applications; or tutoring while in college. Indicate whether the youth received post-secondary educational support during the reporting period that was paid for or provided by the State agency with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(23) Career preparation. Career preparation services focus on developing a youth's ability to find, apply for, and retain appropriate employment. Career preparation includes the following types of instruction and support services: Vocational and career assessment, including career exploration and planning, guidance in setting and assessing vocational and career interests and skills, and help in matching interests and abilities with vocational goals; job seeking and job placement support, including identifying potential employers, writing resumes, completing job applications, developing interview skills, job shadowing, receiving job referrals, using career resource libraries, understanding employee benefits coverage, and securing work permits; retention support, including job coaching; learning how to work with employers and other employees; understanding workplace values such as timeliness and appearance; and understanding authority and customer relationships. Indicate whether the youth received career preparation services during the reporting period that was paid for or provided by the State agency with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(24) Employment programs or vocational training. Employment programs and vocational training are designed to build a youth's skills for a specific trade, vocation, or career through classes or on-site training. Employment programs include a youth's participation in an apprenticeship, internship, or summer employment program and do not include summer or after-school jobs secured by the youth alone. Vocational training includes a youth's participation in vocational or trade programs and the receipt of training in occupational classes for such skills as cosmetology, auto mechanics, building trades, nursing, computer science, and other current or emerging employment sectors. Indicate whether the youth attended an employment program or received vocational training during the reporting period that was paid for or provided by the State agency, with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(25) Budget and financial management. Budget and financial management assistance includes the following types of training and practice: Living within a budget; opening and using a checking and savings account; balancing a checkbook; developing consumer awareness and smart shopping skills; accessing information about credit, loans and taxes; and filling out tax forms. Indicate whether the youth received budget and financial management assistance during the reporting period that was paid for or provided by the State agency with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(26) Housing education and home management training. Housing education includes assistance or training in locating and maintaining housing, including filling out a rental application and acquiring a lease, handling security deposits and utilities, understanding practices for keeping a healthy and safe home, understanding tenants rights and responsibilities, and handling landlord complaints. Home management includes instruction in food preparation, laundry, housekeeping, living cooperatively, meal planning, grocery shopping and basic maintenance and repairs. Indicate whether the youth received housing education or home management training during the reporting period that was paid for or provided by the State agency with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(27) Health education and risk prevention. Health education and risk prevention includes providing information about: Hygiene, nutrition, fitness and exercise, and first aid; medical and dental care benefits, health care resources and insurance, prenatal care and maintaining personal medical records; sex education, abstinence education, and HIV prevention, including education and information about sexual development and sexuality, pregnancy prevention and family planning, and sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS; substance abuse prevention and intervention, including education and information about the effects and consequences of substance use (alcohol, drugs, tobacco) and substance avoidance and intervention. Health education and risk prevention does not include the youth's actual receipt of direct medical care or substance abuse treatment. Indicate whether the youth received these services during the reporting period that were paid for or provided by the State agency with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(28) Family support and healthy marriage education. Such services include education and information about safe and stable families, healthy marriages, spousal communication, parenting, responsible fatherhood, childcare skills, teen parenting, and domestic and family violence prevention. Indicate whether the youth received these services that were paid for or provided by the State agency during the reporting period with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(29) Mentoring. Mentoring means that the youth has been matched with a screened and trained adult for a one-on-one relationship that involves the two meeting on a regular basis. Mentoring can be short-term, but it may also support the development of a long-term relationship. While youth often are connected to adult role models through school, work, or family, this service category only includes a mentor relationship that has been facilitated, paid for or provided by the State agency or its staff. Indicate whether the youth received mentoring services that were paid for or provided by the State agency during the reporting period with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(30) Supervised independent living. Supervised independent living means that the youth is living independently under a supervised arrangement that is paid for or provided by the State agency. A youth in supervised independent living is not supervised 24 hours a day by an adult and often is provided with increased responsibilities, such as paying bills, assuming leases, and working with a landlord, while under the supervision of an adult. Indicate whether the youth was living in a supervised independent living setting that was paid or provided by the State agency during the reporting period with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(31) Room and board financial assistance. Room and board financial assistance is a payment that is paid for or provided by the State agency for room and board, including rent deposits, utilities, and other household start-up expenses. Indicate whether the youth received financial assistance for room and board that was paid for or provided by during the reporting period with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(32) Education financial assistance. Education financial assistance is a payment that is paid for or provided by the State agency for education or training, including allowances to purchase textbooks, uniforms, computers, and other educational supplies; tuition assistance; scholarships; payment for educational preparation and support services (i.e., tutoring), and payment for GED and other educational tests. This financial assistance also includes vouchers for tuition or vocational education or tuition waiver programs paid for or provided by the State agency. Indicate whether the youth received education financial assistance during the reporting period that was paid for or provided by the State agency with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(33) Other financial assistance. Other financial assistance includes any other payments made or provided by the State agency to help the youth live independently. Indicate whether the youth received any other financial assistance that was paid for or provided by the State agency during the reporting period with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the served population this element must be left blank.

(34) Outcomes reporting status. The outcomes reporting status represents the youth's participation, or lack thereof, in the outcomes data collection. If the State agency collects and reports information on any of the data elements in paragraphs (g)(37) through (g)(58) of this section for a youth in the baseline or follow-up sample or population, indicate that the youth participated. If a youth is in the baseline or follow-up sample or population, but the State agency is unable to collect the information, indicate the reason and leave the data elements in paragraph (g)(37) through (g)(58) of this section blank. If a 19-year old youth in the follow-up population is not in the sample, indicate that the youth is not in the sample. If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(i) Youth participated. The youth participated in the outcome survey, either fully or partially.

(ii) Youth declined. The State agency located the youth successfully and invited the youth's participation, but the youth declined to participate in the data collection.

(iii) Parent declined. The State agency invited the youth's participation, but the youth's parent/guardian declined to grant permission. This response may be used only when the youth has not reached the age of majority in the State and State law or policy requires a parent/guardian's permission for the youth to participate in information collection activities.

(iv) Incapacitated. The youth has a permanent or temporary mental or physical condition that prevents him or her from participating in the outcomes data collection.

(v) Incarcerated. The youth is unable to participate in the outcomes data collection because of his or her incarceration.

(vi) Runaway/missing. A youth in foster care is known to have run away or be missing from his or her foster care placement.

(vii) Unable to locate/invite. The State agency could not locate a youth who is not in foster care or otherwise invite such a youth's participation.

(viii) Death. The youth died prior to his participation in the outcomes data collection.

(ix) Not in sample. The 19-year-old youth participated in the outcomes data collection as a part of the baseline population at age 17, but the youth is not in the State's follow-up sample. This response option applies only when the outcomes data collection is required on the follow-up population of 19-year-old youth.

(35) Date of outcome data collection. The date of outcome data collection is the latest date that the agency collected data from a youth for the elements described in paragraphs (g)(38) through (g)(58) of this section. Indicate the month, day and year of the outcomes data collection. If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(36) Foster care status—outcomes. The youth is in foster care if the youth is under the placement and care responsibility of the State title IV-B/IV-E agency in accordance with the definition of foster care in 45 CFR 1355.20. Indicate whether the youth is in foster care on the date of outcomes data collection with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(37) Current full-time employment. A youth is employed full-time if employed at least 35 hours per week, in one or multiple jobs, as of the date of the outcome data collection. Indicate whether the youth is employed full-time, with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth does not answer this question indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(38) Current part-time employment. A youth is employed part-time if employed between one and 34 hours per week, in one or multiple jobs, as of the date of the outcome data collection. Indicate whether the youth is employed part-time, with a “yes” or “no.” If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(39) Employment-related skills. A youth has obtained employment-related skills if the youth completed an apprenticeship, internship, or other on-the-job training, either paid or unpaid, in the past year. The experience must help the youth acquire employment-related skills, such as specific trade skills such as carpentry or auto mechanics, or office skills such as word processing or use of office equipment. Indicate whether the youth has obtained employment-related skills, with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(40) Social Security. A youth is receiving some form of Social Security if receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), either directly or as a dependent beneficiary as of the date of the outcome data collection. SSI payments are made to eligible low-income persons with disabilities. SSDI payments are made to persons with a certain amount of work history who become disabled. A youth may receive SSDI payments through a parent. Indicate whether the youth is receiving a form of Social Security payments, with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(41) Educational aid. A youth is receiving educational aid if using a scholarship, voucher (including education or training vouchers pursuant to section 477(h)(2) of the Social Security Act), grant, stipend, student loan, or other type of educational financial aid to cover educational expenses as of the date of the outcome data collection. Scholarships, grants, and stipends are funds awarded for spending on expenses related to gaining an education. “Student loan” means a government-guaranteed, low-interest loan for students in post-secondary education. Indicate whether the youth is receiving educational aid with a “yes” or “no” as appropriate. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(42) Public financial assistance. A youth is receiving public financial assistance if receiving ongoing cash welfare payments from the government to cover some of his or her basic needs, as of the date of the outcome data collection. Public financial assistance does not include government payments or subsidies for specific purposes, such as unemployment insurance, child care subsidies, education assistance, food stamps or housing assistance. Indicate whether the youth is receiving public financial assistance, with “yes” or “no” as appropriate, and “not applicable” for a youth still in foster care. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(43) Public food assistance. A youth is receiving public food assistance if receiving food stamps in any form (i.e., government-sponsored checks, coupons or debit cards) to buy eligible food at authorized stores as of the date of the outcome data collection. This definition includes receiving public food assistance through the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program. Indicate whether the youth is receiving some form of public food assistance with “yes” or “no,” and “not applicable” for a youth still in foster care. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(44) Public housing assistance. A youth is receiving public housing assistance if the youth is living in government-funded public housing, or receiving a government-funded housing voucher to pay for part of his/her housing costs as of the date of the outcome data collection. CFCIP room and board payments are not included in this definition. Indicate whether the youth is receiving housing assistance with “yes” or “no” and “not applicable” for a youth still in foster care. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(45) Other financial support. A youth has other financial support if receiving any other periodic and/or significant financial resources or support from another source not listed in the elements described in paragraphs (g)(41) through (g)(44) of this section as of the date of outcome data collection. Such support can include payments from a spouse or family member (biological, foster or adoptive), child support that the youth receives for him or herself, or funds from a legal settlement. This definition does not include occasional gifts, such as birthday or graduation checks or small donations of food or personal incidentals, child care subsidies, child support for a youth's child, or other financial support which does not benefit the youth directly in supporting himself or herself. Indicate whether the youth is receiving any other financial support with a “yes” or “no.” If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(46) Highest educational certification received. A youth has received an education certificate if the youth has a high school diploma or general equivalency degree (GED), vocational certificate, vocational license, associate's degree (e.g., A.A.), bachelor's degree (e.g., B.A. or B.S.), or a higher degree as of the date of the outcome data collection. Indicate the highest degree that the youth has received. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(i) A vocational certificate is a document stating that a person has received education or training that qualifies him or her for a particular job, e.g., auto mechanics or cosmetology.

(ii) A vocational license is a document that indicates that the State or local government recognizes an individual as a qualified professional in a particular trade or business.

(iii) An associate's degree is generally a two-year degree from a community college.

(iv) A bachelor's degree is a four-year degree from a college or university.

(v) A higher degree indicates a graduate degree, such as a Master's Degree or a Juris Doctor (J.D.).

(vi) None of the above means that the youth has not received any of the above educational certifications.

(47) Current enrollment and attendance. Indicate whether the youth is enrolled in and attending high school, GED classes, or postsecondary vocational training or college, as of the date of the outcome data collection. A youth is still considered enrolled in and attending school if the youth would otherwise be enrolled in and attending a school that is currently out of session. Indicate whether the youth is currently enrolled and attending school with a “yes” or “no.” If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(48) Connection to adult. A youth has a connection to an adult if, as of the date of the outcome data collection, the youth knows an adult who he or she can go to for advice or guidance when there is a decision to make or a problem to solve, or for companionship when celebrating personal achievements. The adult must be easily accessible to the youth, either by telephone or in person. This can include, but is not limited to adult relatives, parents or foster parents. The definition excludes spouses, partners, boyfriends or girlfriends and current caseworkers. Indicate whether the youth has such a connection with an adult with a “yes” or “no.” If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(49) Homelessness. A youth is considered to have experienced homelessness if the youth had no regular or adequate place to live. This definition includes situations where the youth is living in a car or on the street, or staying in a homeless or other temporary shelter. For a 17-year-old youth in the baseline population, the data element relates to a youth's lifetime experiences. For a 19- or 21-year-old youth in the follow-up population, the data element relates to the youth's experience in the past two years. Indicate if the youth has been homeless with a “yes” or “no.” If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(50) Substance abuse referral. A youth has received a substance abuse referral if the youth was referred for an alcohol or drug abuse assessment or counseling. For a 17-year-old youth in the baseline population, the data element relates to a youth's lifetime experience. For a 19-or 21-year-old youth in the follow-up population, the data element relates to the youth's experience in the past two years. This definition includes either a self-referral or referral by a social worker, school staff, physician, mental health worker, foster parent, or other adult. Alcohol or drug abuse assessment is a process designed to determine if someone has a problem with alcohol or drug use. Indicate whether the youth had a substance abuse referral with a “yes” or “no.” If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(51) Incarceration. A youth is considered to have been incarcerated if the youth was confined in a jail, prison, correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention facility in connection with allegedly committing a crime (misdemeanor or felony). For a 17-year-old youth in the baseline population, the data element relates to a youth's lifetime experience. For a 19-or 21-year-old youth in the follow-up population, the data element relates to the youth's experience in the past two years. Indicate whether the youth was incarcerated with a “yes” or “no”. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(52) Children. A youth is considered to have a child if the youth has given birth herself, or the youth has fathered any children who were born. For a 17-year-old youth in the baseline population, the data element relates to a youth's lifetime experience. For a 19-or 21-year-old youth in the follow-up population, the data element refers to children born to the youth in the past two years only. This refers to biological parenthood. Indicate whether the youth had a child with a “yes” or “no.” If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(53) Marriage at child's birth. A youth is married at the time of the child's birth if he or she was united in matrimony according to the laws of the State to the child's other parent. Indicate whether the youth was married to the child's other parent at the time of the birth of any child reported in the element described in paragraph (g)(52) of this section with a “yes” or “no”. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the answer to the element described in paragraph (g)(52) of this section is “no,” indicate “not applicable.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(54) Medicaid. A youth is receiving Medicaid if the youth is participating in a Medicaid-funded State program, which is a medical assistance program supported by the Federal and State government under title XIX of the Social Security Act as of the date of outcomes data collection. Indicate whether the youth receives Medicaid with “yes,” “no,” or “don't know” as appropriate. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(55) Other health insurance coverage. A youth has other health insurance if the youth has a third party pay (other than Medicaid) for all or part of the costs of medical care, mental health care, and/or prescription drugs, as of the date of the outcome data collection. This definition includes group coverage offered by employers, schools or associations, an individual health plan, self-employed plans, or inclusion in a parent's insurance plan. This also could include access to free health care through a college, Indian Health Service, or other source. Medical or drug discount cards or plans are not insurance. Indicate “yes”, “no”, or “don't know” as appropriate. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.”

(56) Health insurance type: Medical. If the youth has indicated that he or she has health insurance coverage in the element described in paragraph (g)(55) of this section, indicate whether the youth has insurance that pays for all or part of medical health care services. Indicate “yes”, “no”, or “don't know” as appropriate, or “not applicable” if the youth did not indicate any health insurance coverage. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(57) Health insurance type: Mental health. If the youth has indicated that he or she has medical health insurance coverage as described in paragraph (g)(56) of this section, indicate whether the youth has insurance that pays for all or part of the costs for mental health care services, such as counseling or therapy. Indicate “yes”, “no”, or “don't know” as appropriate, or “not applicable” if the youth did not indicate having medical health insurance coverage. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(58) Health insurance type: Prescription drugs. If the youth has indicated that he or she has medical health insurance coverage as described in paragraph (g)(56) of this section, indicate whether the youth has insurance coverage that pays for part or all of the costs of some prescription drugs. Indicate “yes”, “no”, or “don't know” as appropriate, or “not applicable” if the youth did not indicate having medical health insurance coverage. If the youth does not answer this question, indicate “declined.” If the youth is not in the baseline or follow-up population this element must be left blank.

(h) Electronic reporting. The State agency must report all data to ACF electronically according to ACF's specifications and appendix A of this part.

(This requirement has been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under OMB Control Number OMB 0970-0340. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number.)

[73 FR 10365, Feb. 26, 2008, as amended at 77 FR 952, Jan. 6, 2012]

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§1356.84   Sampling.

(a) The State agency may collect and report the information required in section 1356.83(e) of this part on a sample of the baseline population consistent with the sampling requirements described in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section.

(b) The State agency must select the follow-up sample using simple random sampling procedures based on random numbers generated by a computer program, unless ACF approves another sampling procedure. The sampling universe consists of youth in the baseline population consistent with 45 CFR 1356.81(b) who participated in the State agency's data collection at age 17.

(c) The sample size is based on the number of youth in the baseline population who participated in the State agency's data collection at age 17.

(1) If the number of youth in the baseline population who participated in the outcome data collection at age 17 is 5,000 or less, the State agency must calculate the sample size using the formula in appendix C of this part, with the Finite Population Correction (FPC). The State agency must increase the resulting number by 30 percent to allow for attrition, but the sample size may not be larger than the number of youth who participated in data collection at age 17.

(2) If the number of youth in the baseline population who participated in the outcome data collection at age 17 is greater than 5,000, the State agency must calculate the sample size using the formula in appendix C of this part, without the FPC. The State agency must increase the resulting number by 30 percent to allow for attrition, but the sample size must not be larger than the number of youth who participated in data collection at age 17.

[73 FR 10365, Feb. 26, 2008]

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§1356.85   Compliance.

(a) File submission standards. A State agency must submit a data file in accordance with the following file submission standards:

(1) Timely data. The data file must be received in accordance with the reporting period and timeline described in section 1356.83(a) of this part;

(2) Format. The data file must be in a format that meets ACF's specifications; and

(3) Error-free information. The file must contain data in the general and demographic elements described in section 1356.83(g)(1) through (g)(5), (g)(14), and (g)(36) of this part that is 100 percent error-free as defined in paragraph (c) of this section.

(b) Data standards. A State agency also must submit a file that meets the following data standards:

(1) Error-free. The data for the applicable demographic, service and outcomes elements defined in section 1356.83(g)(6) through (13), (g)(15) through (35) and (g)(37) through (58) of this part must be 90 percent error-free as described and assessed according to paragraph (c) of this section.

(2) Outcomes universe. In any Federal fiscal year for which the State agency is required to submit information on the follow-up population, the State agency must submit a youth record containing at least outcomes data for the outcomes status element described in section 1356.83(g)(34) of this part on each youth for whom the State agency reported outcome information as part of the baseline population. Alternatively, if the State agency has elected to conduct sampling in accordance with section 1356.84 of this part, the State agency must submit a record containing at least outcomes data for the outcomes status element described in section 1356.83(g)(34) of this part on each 19-year-old youth in the follow-up population, inclusive of those youth who are not in the sample, and each 21-year-old youth in the follow-up sample.

(3) Outcomes participation rate. The State agency must report outcome information on each youth in the follow-up population at the rates described in paragraphs (b)(3)(i) through (iii) of this section. A youth has participated in the outcomes data collection if the State agency collected and reported a valid response (i.e., a response option other than “declined” or “not applicable”) to any of the outcomes-related elements described in section 1356.83(g)(37) through (g)(58) of this part. ACF will exclude from the calculation of the participation rate any youth in the follow-up population who is reported as deceased, incapacitated or incarcerated in section 1356.83(g)(34) at the time information on the follow-up population is required.

(i) Foster care youth participation rate. The State agency must report outcome information on at least 80 percent of youth in the follow-up population who are in foster care on the date of outcomes data collection as indicated in section 1356.83(g)(35) and (g)(36) of this part.

(ii) Discharged youth participation rate. The State agency must report outcome information on at least 60 percent of youth in the follow-up population who are not in foster care on the date of outcomes data collection as indicated in section 1356.83(g)(35) and (g)(36) of this part.

(iii) Effect of sampling on participation rates. For State agencies electing to sample in accordance with section 1356.84 and appendix C of this part, ACF will apply the outcome participation rates in paragraphs (b)(2)(i) and (ii) of this section to the required sample size for the State.

(c) Errors. ACF will assess each State agency's data file for the following types of errors: Missing data, out-of-range data, or internally inconsistent data. The amount of errors acceptable for each reporting period is described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.

(1) Missing data is any element that has a blank response when a blank response is not a valid response option as described in section 1356.83(g) of this part.

(2) Out-of-range data is any element that contains a value that is outside the parameters of acceptable responses or exceeds, either positively or negatively, the acceptable range of response options as described in section 1356.83(g) of this part; and

(3) Internally inconsistent data is any element that fails an internal consistency check designed to evaluate the logical relationship between elements in each record. The evaluation will identify all elements involved in a particular check as in error.

(d) Review for compliance. (1) ACF will determine whether a State agency's data file for each reporting period is in compliance with the file submission standards and data standards in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section.

(i) For State agencies that achieve the file submission standards, ACF will determine whether the State agency's data file meets the data standards.

(ii) For State agencies that do not achieve the file submission standards or data standards, ACF will notify the State agency that they have an opportunity to submit a corrected data file by the end of the subsequent reporting period in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section.

(2) ACF may use monitoring tools or assessment procedures to determine whether the State agency is meeting all the requirements of section 1356.81 through 1356.85 of this part.

(e) Submitting corrected data and noncompliance. A State agency that does not submit a data file that meets the standards in section 1356.85 of this part will have an opportunity to submit a corrected data file in accordance with paragraphs (e)(1) and (e)(2) of this section.

(1) A State agency must submit a corrected data file no later than the end of the subsequent reporting period as defined in section 1356.83(a) of this part (i.e., by September 30 or March 31).

(2) If a State agency fails to submit a corrected data file that meets the compliance standards in section 1356.85 of this part and the deadline in paragraph (e)(1) of this section, ACF will make a final determination that the State is out of compliance, notify the State agency, and apply penalties as defined in section 1356.86 of this part.

[73 FR 10365, Feb. 26, 2008]

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§1356.86   Penalties for noncompliance.

(a) Definition of Federal funds subject to a penalty. The funds that are subject to a penalty are the CFCIP funds allocated or reallocated to the State agency under section 477(c)(1) of the Act for the Federal fiscal year that corresponds with the reporting period for which the State agency was required originally to submit data according to section 1356.83(a) of this part.

(b) Assessed penalty amounts. ACF will assess penalties in the following amounts, depending on the area of noncompliance:

(1) Penalty for not meeting file submission standards. ACF will assess a penalty in an amount equivalent to two and one half percent (2.5%) of the funds subject to a penalty for each reporting period in which ACF makes a final determination that the State agency's data file does not comply with the file submission standards defined in section 1356.85(a) of this part.

(2) Penalty for not meeting certain data standards. ACF will assess a penalty in an amount equivalent to:

(i) One and one quarter percent (1.25%) of the funds subject to a penalty for each reporting period in which ACF makes a final determination that the State agency's data file does not comply with the data standard for error-free data as defined in section 1356.85(b)(1) of this part.

(ii) One and one quarter percent (1.25%) of the funds subject to a penalty for each reporting period in which ACF makes a final determination that the State agency's data file does not comply with the outcome universe standard defined in section 1356.85(b)(2) of this part.

(iii) One half of one percent (0.5%) of the funds subject to a penalty for each reporting period in which ACF makes a final determination that the State agency's data file does not comply with the participation rate for youth in foster care standard defined in section 1356.85(b)(3)(i) of this part.

(iv) One half of one percent (0.5%) of the funds subject to a penalty for each reporting period in which ACF makes a final determination that the State agency's data file does not comply with the participation rate for discharged youth standard defined in section 1356.85(b)(3)(ii) of this part.

(c) Calculation of the penalty amount. ACF will add together any assessed penalty amounts described in paragraphs (b)(1) or (b)(2) of this section to determine the total calculated penalty result. If the total calculated penalty result is less than one percent of the funds subject to a penalty, the State agency will be penalized in the amount of one percent.

(d) Notification of penalty amount. ACF will advise the State agency in writing of a final determination of noncompliance and the amount of the total calculated penalty as determined in paragraph (c) of this section.

(e) Interest. The State agency will be liable for interest on the amount of funds penalized by the Department, in accordance with the provisions of 45 CFR 30.18.

(f) Appeals. The State agency may appeal, pursuant to 45 CFR part 16, ACF's final determination to the HHS Departmental Appeals Board.

[73 FR 10365, Feb. 26, 2008, as amended at 77 FR 952, Jan. 6, 2012]

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Appendix A to Part 1356—NYTD Data Elements

Element No.Element nameResponses optionsApplicable population
1State2 digit FIPS code
2Report dateCYYMM
   CC = century year (i.e., 20)
   YY = decade year (00-99)
   MM = month (01-12)
3Record numberEncrypted, unique person identification number
4Date of birthCCYYMMDD
   CC = century year (i.e., 20)
   YY = decade year (00-99)
   MM = month (01-12)
   DD= day (01-31)
5SexMale
   Female
6Race—American Indian or Alaska NativeYesAll youth in served, baseline and follow-up populations.
   No
7Race—AsianYes
   No
8Race—Black or African AmericanYes
   No
9Race—Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific IslanderYes
   No
10Race—WhiteYes
   No
11Race—UnknownYes
   No
12Race—DeclinedYes
   No
13Hispanic or Latino EthnicityYes
   No
   Unknown
   Declined
14Foster care status—servicesYesServed population only.
   No
15Local agencyFIPS code(s)
   Centralized unit
16Federally-recognized tribeYes
   No
17Adjudicated delinquentYes
   No
18Education levelLess than 6th gradeServed population only.
   6th grade
   7th grade
   8th grade
   9th grade
   10th grade
   11th grade
   12th grade
   Postsecondary education or training
   College, at least one semester
19Special educationYes
   No
20Independent living needs assessmentYes
   No
21Academic supportYes
   No
22Post-secondary educational supportYes
   No
23Career preparationYes
   No
24Employment programs or vocational trainingYes
   No
25Budget and financial managementYes
   No
26Housing education and home management trainingYes
   No
27Health education and risk preventionYes
   No
28Family Support/Healthy Marriage EducationYes
   No
29MentoringYes
   No
30Supervised independent livingYes
   No
31Room and board financial assistanceYes
   No
32Education financial assistanceYes
   No
33Other financial assistanceYes
   No
34Outcomes reporting statusYouth Participated
Youth Declined.
Parent Declined.
Youth Incapacitated.
Incarcerated.
Runaway/Missing.
Unable to locate/invite.
Death.
Not in sample.
Baseline and follow-up populations (with the exception of the response option “not in sample” which is applicable to 19-year olds in the follow-up only).
35Date of outcome data collectionCCYYMMDDBaseline and follow-up populations.
   CC = century year (i.e., 20)
   YY = decade year (00-99)
   MM = month (01-12)
   DD = day (01-31)
36Foster care status-outcomesYes
   No
37Current full-time employmentYes
   No
   Declined
38Current part-time employmentYes
   No
   Declined
39Employment-related skillsYes
   No
   Declined
40Social SecurityYes
   No
   Declined
41Educational aidYes
   No
   Declined
42Public financial assistanceYesFollow-up population not in foster care.
   No
   Not applicable
   Declined
43Public food assistanceYes
   No
   Not applicable
   Declined
44Public housing assistanceYes
   No
   Not applicable
   Declined
45Other financial supportYesBaseline and follow-up population.
   No
   Declined
46Highest educational certification receivedHigh school diploma/GED
   Vocational certificate
   Vocational license
   Associate's degree
   Bachelor's degree
   Higher degree
   None of the above
   Declined
47Current enrollment and attendanceYes
   No
   Declined
48Connection to adultYes
   No
   Declined
49HomelessnessYes
   No
   Declined
50Substance abuse referralYes
   No
   Declined
51IncarcerationYes
   No
   Declined
52ChildrenYes
   No
   Declined
53Marriage at child's birthYes
   No
   Not applicable
   Declined
54MedicaidYes
   No
   Don't know
   Declined
55Other health insuranceYesBaseline and follow-up population.
   No
   Don't know
   Declined
56Health insurance type—medicalYes
   No
   Don't know
   Not Applicable
   Declined
57Health insurance type—mental healthYes
   No
   Don't know
   Not applicable
   Declined
58Health insurance type—prescription drugsYes.
No.
Don't know.
Not applicable.
Declined.

[77 FR 952, Jan. 6, 2012]

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Appendix B to Part 1356—NYTD Youth Outcome Survey

Topic/element No.Question to youth and response optionsDefinition
INFORMATION TO COLLECT FROM ALL YOUTH SURVEYED FOR OUTCOMES, WHETHER IN FOSTER CARE OR NOT
Current full-time employment (37)Currently are you employed full-time?“Full-time” means working at least 35 hours per week at one or multiple jobs.
   _Yes
   _No
   _Declined
Current part-time employment (38)Currently are you employed part-time?“Part-time” means working at least 1-34 hours per week at one or multiple jobs.
   _Yes
   _No
   _Declined
Employment-related skills (39)In the past year, did you complete an apprenticeship, internship, or other on-the-job training, either paid or unpaid?
_Yes
_No
_Declined
This means apprenticeships, internships, or other on-the-job trainings, either paid or unpaid, that helped the youth acquire employment-related skills (which can include specific trade skills such as carpentry or auto mechanics, or office skills such as word processing or use of office equipment).
Social Security (40)Currently are you receiving social security payments (Supplemental Security Income (SSI, Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), or dependents' payments)?These are payments from the government to meet basic needs for food, clothing, and shelter of a person with a disability. A youth may be receiving these payments because of a parent or guardian's disability, rather than his/her own.
   _Yes
   _No
   _Declined
Educational Aid (41)Currently are you using a scholarship, grant, stipend, student loan, voucher, or other type of educational financial aid to cover any educational expenses?Scholarships, grants, and stipends are funds awarded for spending on expenses related to gaining an education. “Student loan” means a government-guaranteed, low-interest loan for students in post-secondary education.
   _Yes
   _No
   _Declined
Other financial support (45)Currently are you receiving any periodic and/or significant financial resources or support from another source not previously indicated and excluding paid employment?
_Yes
_No
_Declined
This means periodic and/or significant financial support from a spouse or family member (biological, foster or adoptive), child support that the youth receives or funds from a legal settlement. This does not include occasional gifts, such as birthday or graduation checks or small donations of food or personal incidentals, child care subsidies, child support for a youth's child or other financial help that does not benefit the youth directly in supporting himself or herself.
Highest educational certification received (46)What is the highest educational degree or certification that you have received?
_High school diploma/GED
_Vocational certificate
_Vocational license
_Associate's degree (e.g., A.A.)
_Bachelor's degree (e.g., B.A. or B.S.)
_Higher degree
_None of the above
_Declined
“Vocational certificate” means a document stating that a person has received education or training that qualifies him or her for a particular job, e.g., auto mechanics or cosmetology. “Vocational license” means a document that indicates that the State or local government recognizes an individual as a qualified professional in a particular trade or business. An Associate's degree is generally a two-year degree from a community college, and a Bachelor's degree is a four-year degree from a college or university. “Higher degree” indicates a graduate degree, such as a Masters or Doctorate degree. “None of the above” means that the youth has not received any of the above educational certifications.
Current enrollment and attendance (47)Currently are you enrolled in and attending high school, GED classes, post-high school vocational training, or college?
_Yes
_No
_Declined
This means both enrolled in and attending high school, GED classes, or postsecondary vocational training or college. A youth is still considered enrolled in and attending school if the youth would otherwise be enrolled in and attending a school that is currently out of session (e.g., Spring break, summer vacation, etc.).
Connection to adult (48)Currently is there at least one adult in your life, other than your caseworker, to whom you can go for advice or emotional support?
_Yes
_No
_Declined
This refers to an adult who the youth can go to for advice or guidance when there is a decision to make or a problem to solve, or for companionship to share personal achievements. This can include, but is not limited to, adult relatives, parents or foster parents. The definition excludes spouses, partners, boyfriends or girlfriends and current caseworkers. The adult must be easily accessible to the youth, either by telephone or in person.
Homelessness (49)Have you ever been homeless?
OR
_In the past two years, were you homeless at any time?
_Yes
_No
_Declined
“Homeless” means that the youth had no regular or adequate place to live. This includes living in a car, or on the street, or staying in a homeless or other temporary shelter.
Substance abuse referral (50)Have you ever referred yourself or has someone else referred you for an alcohol or drug abuse assessment or counseling?
OR
This includes either self-referring or being referred by a social worker, school staff, physician, mental health worker, foster parent, or other adult for an alcohol or drug abuse assessment or counseling. Alcohol or drug abuse assessment is a process designed to determine if someone has a problem with alcohol or drug use.
   In the past two years, did you refer yourself, or had someone else referred you for an alcohol or drug abuse assessment or counseling?
   _Yes
   _No
   _Declined
Incarceration (51)Have you ever been confined in a jail, prison, correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention facility, in connection with allegedly committing a crime?
OR
This means that the youth was confined in a jail, prison, correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention facility in connection with a crime (misdemeanor or felony) allegedly committed by the youth.
   In the past two years, were you confined in a jail, prison, correctional facility, or juvenile or community detention facility, in connection with allegedly committing a crime?
   _Yes
   _No
   _Declined
Children (52)Have you ever given birth or fathered any children that were born?
OR
This means giving birth to or fathering at least one child that was born. If males do not know, answer “No.”
   In the past two years, did you give birth to or father any children that were born?
   _Yes
   _No
   _Declined
Marriage at Child's Birth (53)If you responded yes to the previous question, were you married to the child's other parent at the time each child was born?This means that when every child was born the youth was married to the other parent of the child.
   _Yes
   _No
   _Declined
Medicaid (54)Currently are you on Medicaid [or use the name of the State's medical assistance program under title XIX]?Medicaid (or the State medical assistance program) is a health insurance program funded by the government.
   _Yes
   _No
   _Don't know
   _Declined
Other Health insurance Coverage (55)Currently do you have health insurance, other than Medicaid?
_Yes
_No
_Don't know
_Declined
“Health insurance” means having a third party pay for all or part of health care. Youth might have health insurance such as group coverage offered by employers or schools, or individual policies that cover medical and/or mental health care and/or prescription drugs, or youth might be covered under parents' insurance. This also could include access to free health care through a college, Indian Tribe, or other source.
Health insurance type—medical (56)Does your health insurance coverage include coverage for medical services?
_Yes
_No
_Don't know
_Not Applicable
_Declined
This means that the youth's health insurance covers at least some medical services or procedures. This question is for only those youth who responded “yes” to having health insurance.
Health insurance type—mental health (57)Does your health insurance include coverage for mental health services?
_Yes
_No
_Don't know
Not Applicable
_Declined
This means that the youth's health insurance covers at least some mental health services. This question is for only those youth who responded “yes” to having health insurance with medical coverage.
Health insurance type—prescription drugs (58)Does your health insurance include coverage for prescription drugs?
_Yes
_No
_Don't know
_Declined
This means that the youth's health insurance covers at least some prescription drugs. This question is for only those youth who responded “yes” to having health insurance with medical coverage.
ADDITIONAL OUTCOMES INFORMATION TO COLLECT FROM YOUTH OUT OF FOSTER CARE
Public financial assistance (42)Currently are you receiving ongoing welfare payments from the government to support your basic needs? [The State may add and/or substitute the name(s) of the State's welfare program].This refers to ongoing welfare payments from the government to support your basic needs. Do not consider payments or subsidies for specific purposes, such as unemployment insurance, child care subsidies, education assistance, food stamps or housing assistance in this category.
   _Yes
   _No
   _Declined
Public food assistance (43)Currently are you receiving public food assistance?
_Yes
_No
_Declined
Public food assistance includes food stamps, which are government-issued coupons or debit cards that recipients can use to buy eligible food at authorized stores. Public food assistance also includes assistance from the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program.
Public housing assistance (44)Currently are you receiving any sort of housing assistance from the government, such as living in public housing or receiving a housing voucher?
_Yes
_No
_Declined
Public housing is rental housing provided by the government to keep rents affordable for eligible individuals and families, and a housing voucher allows participants to choose their own housing while the government pays part of the housing costs. This does not include payments from the child welfare agency for room and board payments.

[77 FR 952, Jan. 6, 2012]

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Appendix C to Part 1356—Calculating Sample Size for NYTD Follow-Up Populations

1. Using Finite Population Correction

The Finite Population Correction (FPC) is applied when the sample is drawn from a population of one to 5,000 youth, because the sample is more than five percent of the population.

eCFR graphic er26fe08.000.gif

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  (Py)(Pn), an estimate of the percent of responses to a dichotomous variable, is (.50)(.50) for the most conservative estimate.

eCFR graphic er26fe08.001.gif

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  Acceptable level of error = .05 (results are plus or minus five percentage points from the actual score)

  Z = 1.645 (90 percent confidence interval)

eCFR graphic er26fe08.002.gif

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  N = number of youth from whom the sample is being drawn

2. Not Using Finite Population Correction

The FPC is not applied when the sample is drawn from a population of over 5,000 youth.

eCFR graphic er26fe08.003.gif

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[73 FR 10372, Feb. 26, 2008]

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