';


Title 36 Part 801

Title 36 → Chapter VIII → Part 801

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 36 Part 801

e-CFR data is current as of October 11, 2018

Title 36Chapter VIII → Part 801


Title 36: Parks, Forests, and Public Property


PART 801—HISTORIC PRESERVATION REQUIREMENTS OF THE URBAN DEVELOPMENT ACTION GRANT PROGRAM

§801.1   Purpose and authorities.

(a) These regulations are required by section 110(c) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1980 (HCDA) (42 U.S.C. 5320) and apply only to projects proposed to be funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) under the Urban Development Action Grant (UDAG) Program authorized by title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended (42 U.S.C. 5301). These regulations establish an expedited process for obtaining the comments of the Council specifically for the UDAG program and, except as specifically provided, substitute for the Council's regulations for the “Protection of Historic and Cultural Properties” (36 CFR part 800).

(b) Section 110(c) of the HCDA of 1980 requires UDAG applicants to: (1) Identify all properties, if any, which are included in the National Register of Historic Places and which will be affected by the project for which the application is made; (2) identify all other properties, if any, which will be affected by such project and which, as determined by the applicant, may meet the Criteria established by the Secretary of the Interior for inclusion in the National Register (36 CFR 60.6); and (3) provide a description of the effect, as determined by the applicant, of the project on properties identified pursuant to (1) and (2). If the applicant determines that such properties are affected, the Act requires that the information developed by the applicant must be forwarded to the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) for review and to the Secretary of the Interior for a determination as to whether the affected properties are eligible for inclusion in the National Register.

(c) Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (16 U.S.C. 470), requires the head of any Federal agency with jurisdiction over a Federal, federally assisted or federally licensed undertaking that affects a property included in or eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places to take into account the effect of the undertaking on such property and afford the Council a reasonable opportunity to comment. Under the UDAG program, applicants assume the status of a Federal agency for purposes of complying with section 106.

return arrow Back to Top

§801.2   Definitions.

The terms defined in 36 CFR 800.2 shall be used in conjunction with this regulation. Furthermore, as used in these regulations:

(a) Urban Development Action Grant (UDAG) Program means the program of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) authorized by title I of the Housing and Community Development Act (HCDA) of 1977 (42 U.S.C. 5318) to assist revitalization efforts in distressed cities and urban counties which require increased public and private investment.

(b) Applicant means cities and urban counties or Pocket of Poverty Communities which meet the criteria at 24 CFR 570.453. Except as specifically provided below, applicants, rather than the Secretary of HUD, must comply with these regulations.

(c) Project means a commercial, industrial, and/or neighborhood project supported by the UDAG program of the Department of HUD, as defined in 24 CFR 570.451(g). A project includes the group of integrally related public and private activities described in the grant application which are to be carried out to meet the objectives of the action grant program and consists of all action grant funded activities together with all non-action grant funded activities. A project is an undertaking as defined in 36 CFR 800.2(c).

(d) State Historic Preservation Officer Review Period is a 45 day period provided to the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officer by section 110(c) of the Housing and Community Development Act (HCDA) of 1980 for comment on the formal submission by the applicant of data on properties listed in the National Register or which may meet the Criteria and which will be affected by the proposed UDAG project. This period does not include any period during which the applicant seeks information from the State Historic Preservation Officer to assist the applicant in identifying properties, determining whether a property meets the Criteria for listing in the National Register of Historic Places and determining whether such property is affected by the project.

(e) Secretary of the Interior Determination Period is a 45 day period provided by section 110(c) of the HCDA of 1980 for a determination as to whether the identified properties are eligible for inclusion in the National Register.

return arrow Back to Top

§801.3   Applicant responsibilities.

As early as possible before the applicant makes a final decision concerning a project and in any event prior to taking any action that would foreclose alternatives or the Council's ability to comment, the applicant should take the following steps to comply with the requirements of section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and section 110 of the HCDA of 1980.

In order to facilitate the commenting process the applicant should forward to the Council information on the proposed project at the earliest practicable time if it appears that National Register properties or properties which meet the Criteria for inclusion will be affected. This will allow the Council to assist the applicant in expeditiously meeting its historic preservation requirements and facilitate the development of the Council's comments.

(a) Information required. It is the primary responsibility of the applicant requesting Council comments to conduct the appropriate studies and to provide the information necessary for a review of the effect a proposed project may have on a National Register property or a property which meets the Criteria, as well as the information necessary for adequate consideration of modifications or alterations to the proposed project that could avoid, mitigate, or minimize any adverse effects. It is the responsibility of the applicant to provide the information specified in §801.7, to make an informed and reasonable evaluation of whether a property meets the National Register Criteria (36 CFR 60.6) and to determine the effect of a proposed undertaking on a National Register property or property which meets the Criteria.

(b) Identification of properties. Section 110 of the HCDA of 1980 makes UDAG applicants responsible for the identification of National Register properties and properties which may meet the Criteria for listing in the National Register that may be affected by the project. An appendix to these regulations sets forth guidance to applicants in meeting their identification responsibilities but does not set a fixed or inflexible standard for such efforts. Meeting this responsibility requires the applicant to make an earnest effort to identify and evaluate potentially affected historic properties by:

(1) Consulting the National Register of Historic Places to determine whether the project's impact area includes such properties;

(2) Obtaining, prior to initiating the State Historic Preservation Officer Review Period, relevant information that the State Historic Preservation Officer may have available concerning historic properties, if any are known, in the project's impact area;

(3) Utilizing local plans, surveys, and inventories of historic properties prepared by the locality or a recognized State or local historic authority;

(4) Utilizing other sources of information or advice the applicant deems appropriate;

(5) Conducting an on-the-ground inspection of the project's impact area by qualified personnel to identify properties which may meet the Criteria for evaluation taking into consideration the views of the State Historic Preservation Officer as to the need for and methodology of such inspections;

(6) Applying the Department of the Interior Criteria for Evaluation (36 CFR 60.6) to properties within the project's impact area.

(c) Evaluation of effect. Applicants are required by section 110(a) of the HCDA of 1980 to include in their applications a description of the effect of a proposed UDAG project on any National Register property and or any property which may meet the Criteria.

(1) Criteria of Effect and Adverse Effect. The following criteria, similar to those set forth in 36 CFR 800.3, shall be used to determine whether a project has an effect or an adverse effect.

(i) Criteria of effect. The effect of a project on a National Register or eligible property is evaluated in the context of the historical, architectural, archeological, or cultural significance possessed by the property. A project shall be considered to have an effect whenever any condition of the project causes or may cause any change, beneficial or adverse, in the quality of the historical, architectural, archeological, or cultural characteristics that qualify the property to meet the Criteria of the National Register. An effect occurs when a project changes the integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling or association of the property that contributes to its significance in accordance with the National Register Criteria. An effect may be direct or indirect. Direct effects are caused by the project and occur at the same time and place. Indirect effects include those caused by the undertaking that are later in time or farther removed in distance, but are still reasonably foreseeable. Such effects involve development of the project site around historic properties so as to affect the access to, use of, or significance of those properties.

(ii) Criteria of adverse effect. Adverse effects on National Register properties or properties which meet the Criteria may occur under conditions which include but are not limited to:

(A) Destruction or alteration of all or part of a property;

(B) Isolation from or alteration of the property's surrounding environment;

(C) Introduction of visual, audible, or atmospheric elements that are out of character with the property or alter its setting;

(D) Neglect of a property resulting in its deterioration or destruction;

(iii) Special considerations. If rehabilitation is a project activity, such components of the project may be considered to have no adverse effect and need not be referred to the Council if they are undertaken in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Historic Preservation Projects (U.S. Department of the Interior, Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service, Washington, DC, 1979) and the State Historic Preservation Officer concurs in the proposed activity. Additionally, the following types of project components or elements will be considered to not normally adversely affect properties listed in the National Register or which meet the Criteria.

(A) Insulation (except for the use of granular or liquid injected foam insulation in exterior walls or other vertical surfaces);

(B) Caulking;

(C) Weatherstripping;

(D) Replacement of Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) equipment, provided that such equipment is not historic and that replacement equipment is screened from public view and that the State Historic Preservation Officer and the applicant agree the equipment will not affect those qualities of the property which qualify it to meet the 36 CFR 60.6 Criteria;

(E) In-kind refenestration (for example, replacement of deteriorated windows of a similar configuration, color and material);

(F) Lowering of ceilings, provided the ceilings will not be visible from outside of the building or from an interior public space and that the State Historic Preservation Officer and the applicant agree it will not affect a quality which qualified the building to meet the 36 CFR 60.6 Criteria;

(G) Replacement in-kind of substantially deteriorated material, provided that the State Historic Preservation Officer and the applicant agree;

(H) Installation of machinery, equipment, furnishings, fixtures, etc., in the interior of existing buildings, provided that the State Historic Preservation Officer and the applicant agree such installations will not affect a quality which qualified the building to meet the 36 CFR 60.6 Criteria.

(I) Site improvements such as sidewalk paving and landscaping, provided that the State Historic Preservation Officer and the applicant agree that the site improvement will not affect those qualities of the property which qualify it to meet the 36 CFR 60.6 Criteria.

(iv) Special considerations for archeological sites. Under certain conditions, alteration of land containing archeological resources in the project area may have no adverse effect on those resources. Procedures for determining whether such conditions exist were published by the Council in the Federal Register on November 26, 1980 (45 FR 78808), as part X of the “Executive Director's Procedures for Review of Proposals for Treatment of Archeological Properties.” Because the identification of archeological sites in an urban context, and consideration of appropriate treatment methods, present special problems, further guidance is provided in Appendix 2.

(2) Determinations of Effect. Prior to submitting an application to HUD, the applicant shall apply the Criteria of Effect and Adverse Effect to all properties which are listed in the National Register or which may meet the Criteria in the area of the project's potential environmental impact. The determination of the Secretary of the Interior shall be final with respect to properties which are eligible for listing in the National Register. The Council will not comment on affected properties which are not either listed in or eligible for listing in the National Register. In order to facilitate the process, information to be requested from the State Historic Preservation Officer under §801.3(b)(2) should include advice on applying the Criteria of Effect and Adverse Effect provided that this period shall not be included in the 45 day State Historic Preservation Officer Review Period. Special attention should be paid to indirect effects, such as changes in land use, traffic patterns, street activity, population density and growth rate. While some aspects of a project may have little potential to adversely affect the significant qualities of a historic property, other project components may meet the Criteria of Effect and Adverse Effect. If any aspect of the project results in an effect determination, further evaluation of the effect shall be undertaken in accordance with these regulations. The resulting determination regarding the effect shall be included in the application.

(i) No effect. If the applicant determines that the project will have no effect on any National Register property and/or property which meets the Criteria, the project requires no further review by the Council unless a timely objection is made by the Executive Director. An objection may be made by the Executive Director at any time during the UDAG application process prior to the expiration of the period for receiving objections to HUD's release of funds as specified in 24 CFR 58.31. The manner in which the Executive Director shall make an objection is set forth in §801.4(a).

(ii) Determinations of no adverse effect. If the applicant finds there is an effect on the property but it is not adverse, the applicant after receiving the comments of the State Historic Preservation Officer during the State Historic Preservation Officer Review Period shall forward adequate documentation (see §801.7(a)) of the Determination, including the written comments of the State Historic Preservation Officer, if available, to the Executive Director for review in accordance with §801.4.

(iii) Adverse effect determination. If the applicant finds the effect to be adverse or if the Executive Director objects to an applicant's no adverse effect determination pursuant to §801.4(a), the applicant shall proceed with the consultation process in accordance with §801.4(b).

return arrow Back to Top

§801.4   Council comments.

The following subsections specify how the Council will respond to an applicant's request for the Council's comments required to satisfy the applicant's responsibilities under section 106 of the Act and section 110 of the HCDA of 1980. When appropriate, an applicant may waive the Council time periods specified in these regulations.

(a) Executive Director's Objection to No Effect Determination. If the Executive Director has reason to question an applicant's determination of no effect, he shall notify the applicant and HUD. If the Executive Director does not object within 15 days of such notification, the project may proceed. If the Executive Director objects, he shall specify whether or not the project will have an adverse effect on National Register property and/or property which meets the Criteria. Normally, the Executive Director will object to a determination of no effect when the record does not support the applicant's determination (see §801.7(a)). The applicant must then comply with the provisions of subsection (b) if the Executive Director determines that the project will have no adverse effect or subsection (c) if the Executive Director has determined that the project will have an adverse effect.

(b) Response to Determinations of No Adverse Effect. (1) Upon receipt of a Determination of No Adverse Effect from an applicant, the Executive Director will review the Determination and supporting documentation required by §801.7(a). Failure to provide the required information at the time the applicant requests Council comments will delay the process. The Executive Director will respond to the applicant within 15 days after receipt of the information required in §801.7(a). Unless the Executive Director objects to the Determination within 15 days after receipt, the applicant will be considered to have satisfied its responsibilities under section 106 of the Act and these regulations and no further Council review is required.

(2) If the Executive Director objects to a Determination of No Adverse Effect, the consultation process pursuant to §801.4(c) shall be initiated.

(c) Consultation process. If any aspect of the project is found to have adverse effects on National Register property or property which has been determined by the applicant or the Secretary of the Interior to meet the Criteria, the applicant, the State Historic Preservation Officer and the Executive Director shall consult to consider feasible and prudent alternatives to the project that could avoid, mitigate, or minimize the adverse effect on the affected property.

(1) Parties. The applicant, the State Historic Preservation Officer and the Executive Director shall be the consulting parties. The Department of HUD, other representatives of national, State, or local units of government, other parties in interest, and public and private organizations, may be invited by the consulting parties to participate in the consultation process.

(2) Timing. The consulting parties shall have a total of 45 days from the receipt by the Executive Director of the information required in §801.7(a) to agree upon feasible and prudent alternatives to avoid, mitigate, or minimize any adverse effects of the project. Failure of an applicant to provide the information required in §801.7(b) will delay the beginning of the time period specified above.

(3) Information requirements. The applicant shall provide copies of the information required in §801.7(b) to the consulting parties at the initiation of the consultation process and make it readily available for public inspection.

(4) Public meeting. An onsite inspection and a Public Information Meeting may be held in accordance with the provisions of 36 CFR 800.6(b). Public hearings or meetings conducted by the applicant in the preparation of the application may, as specified below, substitute for such Public Information Meetings. Upon request of the applicant, the Executive Director may find that such public meetings have been adequate to consider the effect of the project on National Register properties or properties which meet the Criteria, and no further Public Information Meeting is required.

(5) Consideration of alternatives. During the consultation period, the consulting parties shall, in accordance with the policies set forth in 36 CFR 800.6(b) (4) and (5), review the proposed project to determine whether there are prudent and feasible alternatives to avoid or satisfactorily mitigate adverse effect. If they agree on such alternatives, they shall execute a Memorandum of Agreement in accordance with §801.4(c) specifying how the undertaking will proceed to avoid or mitigate the adverse effect.

(6) Acceptance of adverse effect. If the consulting parties determine that there are no feasible and prudent alternatives that could avoid or satisfactorily mitigate the adverse effects and agree that it is in the public interest to proceed with the proposed project they shall execute a Memorandum of Agreement in accordance with §801.4(c) acknowledging this determination and specifying any recording, salvage, or other measures associated with acceptance of the adverse effects that shall be taken before the project proceeds.

(7) Failure to agree. Upon the failure of the consulting parties to agree upon the terms for a Memorandum of Agreement within the specified time period, or upon notice of a failure to agree by any consulting party to the Executive Director, the Executive Director within 15 days shall recommend to the Chairman whether the matter should be scheduled for consideration at a Council meeting. If the Executive Director recommends that the Council not consider the matter, he shall simultaneously notify all Council members and provide them copies of the preliminary case report and the recommendation to the Chairman. The applicant and the State Historic Preservation Officer shall be notified in writing of the Executive Director's recommendation.

(d) Memorandum of Agreement—(1) Preparation of Memorandum of Agreement. It shall be the responsibility of the Executive Director to prepare each Memorandum of Agreement required under this part. As appropriate, other parties may be invited by the consulting parties to be signatories to the Agreement or otherwise indicate their concurrence with the Agreement. In order to facilitate the process, the applicant may provide the Executive Director a draft for a Memorandum of Agreement. At the applicant's option, such draft may be prepared at the time the applicant makes its determinations that properties listed in the National Register or which may meet the Criteria for listing in the National Register may be adversely affected. The applicant must provide the State Historic Preservation Officer an opportunity to concur in or comment on its draft Agreement.

(2) Review of Memorandum of Agreement. Upon receipt of an executed Memorandum of Agreement, the Chairman shall institute a 15 day review period. Unless the Chairman notifies the applicant that the matter has been placed on the agenda for consideration at a Council meeting, the Agreement shall become final when ratified by the Chairman or upon the expiration of the 15 day review period with no action taken. Copies will be provided to signatories. A copy of the Memorandum of Agreement should be included in any Environmental Assessment or Environmental Impact Statement prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act.

(3) Effect of Memorandum of Agreement. (i) Agreements duly executed in accordance with these regulations shall constitute the comments of the Council and shall evidence satisfaction of the applicant's responsibilities for the proposed project under section 106 of the Act and these regulations.

(ii) If the Council has commented on an application that is not approved by HUD and a subsequent UDAG application is made for the same project, the project need not be referred to the Council again unless there is a significant amendment to the project which would alter the effect of the project on previously considered properties or result in effects on additional National Register properties or properties which meet the Criteria.

(iii) Failure to carry out the terms of a Memorandum of Agreement requires that the applicant again request the Council's comments in accordance with these regulations. In such instances, until the Council issues its comments under these regulations the applicant shall not take or sanction any action or make any irreversible or irretrievable commitment that could result in an adverse effect with respect to National Register properties or properties which are eligible for inclusion in the National Register covered by the Agreement or that would foreclose the Council's consideration of modifications or alternatives to the proposed project that could avoid or mitigate the adverse effect.

(4) Amendment of a Memorandum of Agreement. Amendments to the Agreement may be made as specified in 36 CFR 800.6(c)(4).

(5) Report on Memorandum of Agreement. Within 90 days after carrying out the terms of the Agreement, the applicant shall report to all signatories on the actions taken.

(e) Council Meetings. Council meetings to consider a project will be conducted in accordance with the policies set forth in 36 CFR 800.6(d).

(1) Response to recommendation concerning consideration at Council meeting. Upon receipt of a recommendation from the Executive Director concerning consideration of a proposed project at a Council meeting, the Chairman shall determine whether or not the project will be considered. The Chairman shall make a decision within 15 days of receipt of the recommendation of the Executive Director. In reaching a decision the Chairman shall consider any comments from Council members. If three members of the Council object within the 15 day period to the Executive Director's recommendation, the project shall be scheduled for consideration at a Council or panel meeting. Unless the matter is scheduled for consideration by the Council the Chairman shall notify the applicant, the Department of HUD, the State Historic Preservation Officer and other parties known to be interested of the decision not to consider the matter. Such notice shall be evidence of satisfaction of the applicant's responsibilities for the proposed project under section 106 of the Act and these regulations.

(2) Decision to consider the project. When the Council will consider a proposed project at a meeting, the Chairman shall either designate five members as a panel to hear the matter on behalf of the full Council or schedule the matter for consideration by the full Council. In either case, the meeting shall take place within 30 days of the Chairman's decision to consider the project, unless the applicant agrees to a longer time.

(i) A panel shall consist of three non-Federal members, one as Chairman, and two Federal members. The Department of HUD may not be a member of such panel.

(ii) Prior to any panel or full Council consideration of a matter, the Chairman will notify the applicant and the State Historic Preservation Officer and other interested parties of the date on which the project will be considered. The Executive Director, the applicant, the Department of HUD, and the State Historic Preservation Officer shall prepare reports in accordance with §801.7(b). Reports from the applicant and the State Historic Preservation Officer must be received by the Executive Director at least 7 days before any meeting.

(3) Notice of Council meetings. At least 7 days notice of all meetings held pursuant to this section shall be given by publication in the Federal Register. The Council shall provide a copy of the notice by mail to the applicant, the State Historic Preservation Officer, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The Council will inform the public of the meeting through appropriate local media.

(4) Statements to the Council. An agenda shall provide for oral statements from the Executive Director; the applicant; the Department of HUD; parties in interest; the Secretary of the Interior; the State Historic Preservation Officer; representatives of national, State, or local units of government; and interested public and private organizations and individuals. Parties wishing to make oral remarks should notify the Executive Director at least two days in advance of the meeting. Parties wishing to have their written statements distributed to Council members prior to the meeting should send copies of the statements to the Executive Director at least 5 days in advance.

(5) Comments of the Council. The written comments of the Council will be issued within 7 days after a meeting. Comments by a panel shall be considered the comments of the full Council. Comments shall be made to the applicant requesting comment and to the Department of HUD. Immediately after the comments are made to the applicant and the Department of HUD, the comments of the Council will be forwarded to the President and the Congress as a special report under authority of section 202(b) of the Act and a notice of availability will be published in the Federal Register. The comments of the Council shall be made available to the State Historic Preservation Officer, other parties in interest, and the public upon receipt of the comments by the applicant. The applicant should include the comments of the Council in any final Environmental Impact Statement prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act.

(6) Action in response to Council comments. The comments of the Council shall be taken into account in reaching a final decision on the proposed project. When a final decision regarding the proposed project is reached by the applicant and the Department of HUD, they shall submit written reports to the Council describing the actions taken by them and other parties in response to the Council's comments and the impact that such actions will have on the affected National Register properties or properties eligible for inclusion in the National Register. Receipt of this report by the Chairman shall be evidence that the applicant has satisfied its responsibilities for the proposed project under section 106 of the Act and these regulations. The Council may issue a final report to the President and the Congress under authority of section 202(b) of the Act describing the actions taken in response to the Council's comments including recommendations for changes in Federal policy and programs, as appropriate.

(f) Suspense of Action. Until the Council issues its comments under these regulations and during the State Historic Preservation Officer Review Period and the determination period of the Secretary of the Interior, good faith consultation shall preclude the applicant from taking or sanctioning any action or making any irreversible or irretrievable commitment that could result in an adverse effect on a National Register property or property which may meet the Criteria or that would foreclose the consideration of modifications or alternatives to the proposed project that could avoid, mitigate, or minimize such adverse effects. In no case shall UDAG funds be used for physical activities on the project site until the Council comments have been completed. Normal planning and processing of applications short of actual commitment of funds to the project may proceed.

(g) Lead Agency. If the project proposed by the applicant involves one or more Federal agencies, they may agree on a single lead agency to meet the requirements of section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and section 110 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1980 and notify the Executive Director. If the applicant is the designated lead agency, these regulations shall be followed. If a Federal agency is designated lead agency, the process in 36 CFR part 800 shall be used.

(h) Compliance by a Federal Agency. An applicant may make a finding that it proposes to accept a Federal agency's compliance with section 106 of the Act and 36 CFR 800 where its review of the Federal agency's findings indicate that:

(1) The project is identical with an undertaking reviewed by the Council under 36 CFR part 800; and

(2) The project and its impacts are included within the area of potential environmental impact described by the Federal agency;

The applicant shall notify the State Historic Preservation Officer and the Executive Director of its finding of compliance with section 106 of the Act and 36 CFR part 800 and provide a copy of the Federal agency's document where the finding occurs. Unless the Executive Director objects within 10 days of receipt of such notice the Council need not be afforded further opportunity for comment. If the Executive Director objects to the finding of the applicant, the applicant shall comply with §801.4.

return arrow Back to Top

§801.5   State Historic Preservation Officer responsibilities.

(a) The State Historic Preservation Officer shall have standing to participate in the review process established by section 110(c) of the HCDA of 1980 whenever it concerns a project located within the State Historic Preservation Officer's jurisdiction by the following means: providing, within 30 days, information requested by an applicant under §801.3(b); responding, within 45 days, to submittal of a determination by the applicant under section 110 of the HCDA of 1980 that National Register property or property which meets the Criteria may be affected by the proposed project; participating in a Memorandum of Agreement that the applicant or the Executive Director may prepare under this part; and participating in a panel or full Council meeting that may be held pursuant to these regulations. Pursuant to section 110(c) of the HCDA of 1980, the State Historic Preservation Officer has a maximum period of 45 days in which to formally comment on an applicant's determination that the project may affect a property that is listed in the National Register or which may meet the Criteria for listing in the National Register. This period does not include the time during which the applicant seeks information from the State Historic Preservation Officer for determining whether a property meets the Criteria for listing in the National Register and whether such property is affected by the project.

(b) The failure of a State Historic Preservation Officer to participate in any required steps of the process set forth in this part shall not prohibit the Executive Director and the applicant from concluding the section 106 process, including the execution of a Memorandum of Agreement.

return arrow Back to Top

§801.6   Coordination with requirements under the National Environmental Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.).

The National Historic Preservation Act and the National Environmental Policy Act create separate and distinct responsibilities. The National Historic Preservation Act applies to those aspects of a project which may affect National Register properties and those which are eligible for listing in the National Register. The requirements for the National Environmental Policy Act apply to the effect that the project will have on the human environment. To the extent that the applicant finds it practicable to do so, the requirements of these two statutes should be integrated. Some projects, for reasons other than the effects on historic properties, may require an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) subject to the time requirements for a draft and final EIS, in which case the applicant may choose to separately relate to the State Historic Preservation Officer, the Department of the Interior, and the Council for purposes of section 110(c) of the HCDA of 1980. In that event, information in the draft EIS should indicate that compliance with section 106 and these regulations is underway and the final EIS should reflect the results of this process. Applicants are directed to 36 CFR 800.9, which describes in detail the manner in which the requirements of these two acts should be integrated and applies to all UDAG applicants under these regulations.

In those instances in which an Environmental Impact Statement will be prepared for the project, the applicant should consider phasing compliance with these procedures and the preparation of the Statement.

return arrow Back to Top

§801.7   Information requirements.

(a) Information To Be Retained by Applicants Determining No Effect. (1) Recommended Documentation for a Determination of No Effect. Adequate documentation of a Determination of No Effect pursuant to §801.3(c)(2)(i) should include the following:

(i) A general discussion and chronology of the proposed project;

(ii) A description of the proposed project including, as appropriate, photographs, maps, drawings, and specifications;

(iii) A statement that no National Register property or property which meets the Criteria exist in the project area, or a brief statement explaining why the Criteria of Effect (See §801.3(c)) was found inapplicable;

(iv) Evidence of consultation with the State Historic Preservation Officer concerning the Determination of No Effect; and

(v) Evidence of efforts to inform the public concerning the Determination of No Effect.

(2) The information requirements set forth in this section are meant to serve as guidance for applicants in preparing No Effect Determinations. The information should be retained by the applicant, incorporated into any environmental reports or documents prepared concerning the project, and provided to the Executive Director only in the event of an objection to the applicant's determination.

(b) Reports to the Council. In order to adequately assess the impact of a proposed project on National Register and eligible properties, it is necessary for the Council to be provided certain information. For the purposes of developing Council comments on UDAG projects the following information is required. Generally, to the extent that relevant portions of a UDAG application meet the requirements set forth below it will be sufficient for the purposes of Council review and comment.

(1) Documentation for Determination of No Adverse Effect. Adequate documentation of a Determination of No Adverse Effect pursuant to §801.3(c)(1) should include the following:

(i) A general discussion and chronology of the proposed project;

(ii) A description of the proposed project including, as appropriate, photographs, maps, drawings and specifications;

(iii) A copy of the National Register form or a copy of the Determination of Eligibility documentation for each property that will be affected by the project including a description of each property's physical appearance and significance;

(iv) A brief statement explaining why each of the Criteria of Adverse Effect (See §801.3(c)(1)) was found inapplicable;

(v) Written views of the State Historic Preservation Officer concerning the Determination of No Adverse Effect, if available; and,

(vi) An estimate of the cost of the project including the amount of the UDAG grant and a description of any other Federal involvement.

(2) Preliminary Case Reports. Preliminary Case Reports should be submitted with a request for comments pursuant to §801.4(b) and should include the following information:

(i) A general discussion and chronology of the proposed project;

(ii) The status of the project in the HUD approval process:

(iii) The status of the project in the National Environmental Policy Act compliance process and the target date for completion of all the applicant's environmental responsibilities;

(iv) A description of the proposed project including as appropriate, photographs, maps, drawings and specifications;

(v) A copy of the National Register form or a copy of the Determination of Eligibility documentation for each property that will be affected by the project including a description of each property's physical appearance and significance;

(vi) A brief statement explaining why any of the Criteria of Adverse Effect (See §801.3(c)(1)(b)) apply;

(vii) Written views of the State Historic Preservation Officer concerning the effect on the property, if available;

(viii) The views of Federal agencies, State and local governments, and other groups or individuals when known as obtained through the OMB Circular A-95 process or the environmental review process, public hearings or other applicant processes;

(ix) A description and analysis of alternatives that would avoid the adverse effects;

(x) A description and analysis of alternatives that would mitigate the adverse effects; and,

(xi) An estimate of the cost of the project including the amount of the UDAG grant and a description of any other Federal involvement.

(c) Reports for Council Meetings. Consideration of a proposed project by the full Council or a panel pursuant to §801.4(b) is based upon reports from the Executive Director, the State Historic Preservation Officer and Secretary of the Interior. Requirements for these reports are specified in 36 CFR 800.13(c). Additionally, reports from the applicant and the Department of HUD are required by these regulations. The requirements for these reports consist of the following:

(1) Report of the Applicant. The report from the applicant requesting comments shall include a copy of the relevant portions of the UDAG application; a general discussion and chronology of the proposed project; an account of the steps taken to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); any relevant supporting documentation in studies that the applicant has completed; an evaluation of the effect of the project upon the property or properties, with particular reference to the impact on the historical, architectural, archeological, and cultural values; steps taken or proposed by the applicant to avoid or mitigate adverse effects of the project; a thorough discussion of alternate courses of action; and an analysis comparing the advantages resulting from the project with the disadvantages resulting from the adverse effects on National Register or eligible properties.

(2) Report of the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. The report from the Secretary shall include the status of the application in the UDAG approval process, past involvement of the Department with the applicant and the proposed project or land area for the proposed project, and information on how the applicant has met other requirements of the Department for the proposed project.

return arrow Back to Top

§801.8   Public participation.

(a) The Council encourages maximum public participation in the process established by these regulations. Particularly important, with respect to the UDAG program, is participation by the citizens of neighborhoods directly or indirectly affected by projects, and by groups concerned with historic and cultural preservation.

(b) The applicant, in preparing and following its citizen participation plan called for by 24 CFR 570.456(c)(11)(i)(A), should ensure that adequate provision is made for participation by citizens and organizations having interests in historic preservation and in the historic and cultural values represented in affected neighborhoods. 24 CFR 570.431(c) sets forth criteria for citizen participation plans. These should be carefully considered with specific reference to ensuring that local concerns relevant to historic preservation are fully identified, and that citizens are provided with full and accurate information about each project and its effects on historic properties. The applicant should ensure that potentially concerned citizens and organizations are fully involved in the identification of properties which may meet the National Register Criteria, and that they are fully informed, in a timely manner, of determinations of No Effect, No Adverse Effect, and Adverse Effect, and of the progress of the consultation process. Applicants are referred to 36 CFR 800.15 for Council guidelines for public participation.

(c) The Council welcomes the views of the public, especially those groups which may be affected by the proposed project, during its evaluation of the applicant's determination of effect, and will solicit the participation of the public in Council and panel meetings held to consider projects.

return arrow Back to Top

Appendix 1 to Part 801—Identification of Properties: General

A. Introduction

Because of the high probability of locating properties which are listed in the National Register or which meet the Criteria for listing in many older city downtowns, this appendix is designed to serve as guidance for UDAG applicants in identifying such properties. This appendix sets forth guidance for applicants and does not set a fixed or inflexible standard for identification efforts.

B. Role of the State Historic Preservation Officer

In any effort to locate National Register properties or properties which meet the Criteria, the State Historic Preservation Officer is a key source of information and advice. The State Historic Preservation Officer will be of vital assistance to the applicant. The State Historic Preservation Officer can provide information on known properties and on studies which have taken place in and around the project area. Early contact should be made with the State Historic Preservation Officer for recommendations about how to identify historic properties. For UDAG projects, identification of National Register properties and properties which meet the Criteria is the responsibility of the applicant. The extent of the identification effort should be made with the advice of the State Historic Preservation Officer. The State Historic Preservation Officer can be a knowledgeable source of information regarding cases wherein the need for a survey of historic properties is appropriate, recommended type and method of a survey and the boundaries of any such survey. Due consideration should be given to the nature of the project and its impacts, the likelihood of historic properties being affected and the state of existing knowledge regarding historic properties in the area of the project's potential environmental impact.

C. Levels of Identification

1. The area of the project's potential environmental impact consists of two distinct subareas: that which will be disturbed directly (generally the construction site and its immediate environs) and that which will experience indirect effects. Within the area of indirect impact, impacts will be induced as a result of carrying the project out. Historic and cultural properties subject to effect must be identified in both subareas, and the level of effort necessary in each may vary. The level of effort needed is also affected by the stage of planning and the quality of pre-existing information. Obviously, if the area of potential environmental impact has already been fully and intensively studied before project planning begins, there is no need to duplicate this effort. The State Historic Preservation Officer should be contacted for information on previous studies. If the area has not been previously intensively studied, identification efforts generally fall into three levels:

a. Overview Study: This level of study is normally conducted as a part of general planning and is useful at an early stage in project formulation. It is designed to obtain a general understanding of an area's historic and cultural properties in consultation with the State Historic Preservation Officer, by:

(1) Assessing the extent to which the area has been previously subjected to study;

(2) Locating properties previously recorded;

(3) Assessing the probability that properties eligible for the National Register will be found if the area is closely inspected, and

(4) Determining the need, if any, for further investigation.

An overview study includes study of pertinent records (local histories, building inventories, architectural reports, archeological survey reports, etc.), and usually some minor on-the-ground inspection.

b. Identification Study: An identification study attempts to specifically identify and record all properties in an area that may meet the criteria for listing in the National Register. In conducting the study, the applicant should seek the advice of the State Historic Preservation Officer regarding pertinent background data. A thorough on-the-ground inspection of the subject area by qualified personnel should be undertaken. For very large areas, or areas with uncertain boundaries, such a study may focus on representative sample areas, from which generalizations may be made about the whole.

c. Definition and Evaluation Study: If an overview and/or an identification study have indicated the presence or probable presence of properties that may meet the National Register Criteria but has not documented them sufficiently to allow a determination to be made about their eligibility, a definition and evaluation study is necessary. Such a study is directed at specific potentially eligible properties or at areas known or suspected to contain such properties. It includes an intensive on-the-ground inspection and related studies as necessary, conducted by qualified personnel, and provides sufficient information to apply the National Register's “Criteria for Evaluation” (36 CFR 60.6).

2. An overview study will normally be needed to provide basic information for planning in the area of potential environmental impact. Unless this study indicates clearly that no further identification efforts are needed (e.g., by demonstrating that the entire area has already been intensively inspected with negative results, or by demonstrating that no potentially significant buildings have ever been built there and there is virtually no potential for archeological resources), and identification study will probably be needed within the area of potential environmental impact. This study may show that there are no potentially eligible properties within the area, or may show that only a few such properties exist and document them sufficiently to permit a determination of eligibility to be made in accordance with 36 CFR part 60. Alternatively, the study may indicate that potentially eligible properties exist in the area, but may not document them to the standards of 36 CFR part 60. Should this occur, a definition and evaluation study is necessary for those properties falling within the project's area of direct effect and for those properties subject to indirect effects. If a property falls within the general area of indirect effect, but no indirect effects are actually anticipated on the property in question, a definition and evaluation study will normally be superfluous.

return arrow Back to Top

Appendix 2 to Part 801—Special Procedures for Identification and Consideration of Archeological Properties in an Urban Context

A. Archeological sites in urban contexts are often difficult to identify and evaluate in advance of construction because they are sealed beneath modern buildings and structures. Prehistoric and historic sites within cities may be important both to science and to an understanding of each city's history, however, and should be considered in project planning. Special methods can be used to ensure effective and efficient consideration and treatment of archeological sites in UDAG projects.

1. If it is not practical to physically determine the existence or nonexistence of archeological sites in the project area, the probability or improbability of their existence can be determined, in most cases, through study of:

a. Information on the pre-urban natural environment, which would have had an effect on the location of prehistoric sites;

b. Information from surrounding areas and general literature concerning the location of prehistoric sites;

c. State and local historic property registers or inventories;

d. Archeological survey reports;

e. Historic maps, atlases, tax records, photographs, and other sources of information on the locations of earlier structures;

f. Information on discoveries of prehistoric or historic material during previous construction, land levelling, or excavation, and

g. Some minor on-the-ground inspection.

2. Should the study of sources such as those listed in section (1)(a) above reveal that the following conditions exist, it should be concluded that a significant likelihood exists that archeological sites which meet the National Register Criteria exist on the project site:

a. Discoveries of prehistoric or historic material remains have been reliably reported on or immediately adjacent to the project site, and these are determined by the State Historic Preservation Officer or other archeological authority to meet the Criteria for the National Register because of their potential value for public interpretation or the study of significant scientific or historical research problems; or

b. Historical or ethnographic data, or discoveries of material, indicate that a property of potential cultural value to the community or some segment of the community (e.g., a cemetery) lies or lay within the project site; or

c. The pre-urbanization environment of the project site would have been conducive to prehistoric occupation, or historic buildings or occupation sites are documented to have existed within the project site in earlier times, and such sites or buildings are determined by the State Historic Preservation Officer or other archeological authority to meet the Criteria of the National Register because of their potential value for public interpretation or the study of significant scientific or historical research questions, and

d. The recent history of the project site has not included extensive and intensive ground disturbance (grading, blasting, cellar digging, etc.) in the location, or extending to the depth at which the remains of significant sites, buildings, or other features would be expected.

B. Where review of sources of information such as those listed in section (1)(a) above reveals no significant likelihood that archeological resources which meet the National Register Criteria exist on the project site, no further review is required with respect to archeology provided the State Historic Preservation Officer concurs.

C. Where review of sources of information such as those listed in section (1)(a) above, reveals that archeological resources which meet the National Register Criteria are likely to exist on the project site, but these resources are so deeply buried that the project will not intrude upon them, or they are in a portion of the project site that will not be disturbed, a determination of “No Effect” is appropriate in accordance with §801.3(c)(2)(i).

D. Where review of sources of information such as those listed in section (1)(a) above, reveals that archeological resources which meet the Criteria exist or are likely to exist on the project site, and that the project is likely to disturb them, a determination of “No Adverse Effect” may be made in accordance with §801.3(c)(2)(ii) if:

1. The applicant and/or developer is committed to fund a professionally supervised and planned pre-construction testing program, and to modification of the project in consultation with the State Historic Preservation Officer to protect or incorporate within the project the archeological resources discovered with a minimum of damage to them, or if:

2. The applicant and/or developer is committed to fund a professionally supervised and planned archeological salvage program, coordinated with site clearing and construction, following the standards of the Secretary of the Interior issued pursuant to the Archeological and Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 469) and the applicant finds that this program negates the adverse effect, in accordance with the standards set forth in section X of the Council's “Supplementary Guidance for Review of Proposals for Treatment of Archeological Properties” (45 FR 78808).

E. When archeological sites included in the National Register or which meet the Criteria are found to exist on the project site or in the area of the project's environmental impact, and where the project is likely to disturb such resources, and where the adverse effect of such disturbance cannot be negated by archeological salvage, a determination of “Adverse Effect” is appropriate in accordance with §801.3(a)(2)(iii).

return arrow Back to Top