';


Title 26 Part 1 → §1.585-7

Title 26 → Chapter I → Subchapter A → Part 1 → §1.585-7

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 26 Part 1 → §1.585-7

e-CFR data is current as of December 5, 2019

Title 26Chapter ISubchapter APart 1 → §1.585-7


Title 26: Internal Revenue
PART 1—INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED)


§1.585-7   Elective cut-off method of changing from the reserve method of section 585.

(a) General rule. Any large bank (as defined in §1.585-5(b)) that maintained a reserve for bad debts under section 585 for the taxable year immediately preceding its disqualification year (as defined in §1.585-5(d)(1)) may elect to use the cut-off method set forth in this section. Any such election must be made at the time and in the manner prescribed by §1.585-8. If a bank makes this election, the bank must maintain its bad debt reserve for its pre- disqualification loans, as prescribed in paragraph (b) of this section, and the bank must include in income any excess balance in this reserve, as required by paragraph (c) of this section. The bank may not deduct, for its disqualification year or any subsequent taxable year, any amount allowed under section 166(a) for pre-disqualification loans (as defined in paragraph (b)(2) of this section) that become worthless in whole or in part, except as allowed by paragraph (b)(1) of this section. However, except as provided in paragraph (d)(3) of this section, the bank may deduct, for its disqualification year or any subsequent taxable year, amounts allowed under section 166(a) for loans that the bank originates or acquires on or after the first day of its disqualification year and that become worthless in whole or in part. If a bank makes the election allowed by this paragraph (a), its change to the specific charge-off method of accounting for bad debts in its disqualification year does not give rise to a section 481(a) adjustment.

(b) Maintaining reserve for pre-disqualification loans—(1) In general. A bank that makes the election allowed by paragraph (a) of this section must maintain its bad debt reserve for its pre-disqualification loans (as defined in paragraph (b)(2) of this section). Except as provided in paragraph (d)(3) of this section, the bank must charge against the reserve the amount of any losses resulting from these loans (including losses resulting from the sale or other disposition of these loans), and the bank must add to the reserve the amount of recoveries with respect to these loans. In general, the reserve must be maintained in the manner provided by former section 166(c) of the Internal Revenue Code and the regulations thereunder. However, after the balance in the reserve is reduced to zero, the bank is to account for any losses and recoveries with respect to outstanding pre-disqualification loans under the specific charge-off method of accounting for bad debts, as if the bank always had accounted for these loans under this method.

(2) Definition of pre-disqualification loans. For purposes of this section, a pre-disqualification loan of a bank is any loan that the bank held on the last day of its taxable year immediately preceding its disqualification year (as defined in §1.585-5(d)(1)). If the amount of a pre-disqualification loan is increased during or after the disqualification year, the amount of the increase is not treated as a pre-disqualification loan.

(c) Amount to be included in income when reserve balance exceeds loan balance. If, as of the close of any taxable year, the balance in a bank's reserve that is maintained under paragraph (b) of this section exceeds the balance of the bank's outstanding pre-disqualification loans, the bank must include in income the amount of the excess for the taxable year. The balance in the reserve is then reduced by the amount of this excess. See paragraph (d) of this section for rules on the application of this paragraph (c) when a bank disposes of loans.

(d) Effect of disposing of loans—(1) In general. Except as provided in paragraphs (d)(2) and (d)(3) of this section, if a bank that makes the election allowed by paragraph (a) of this section sells or otherwise disposes of any of its outstanding pre-disqualification loans, the bank is to reduce the balance of its outstanding pre-disqualification loans by the amount of the loans disposed of, for purposes of applying paragraph (c) of this section.

(2) Section 381 transactions. If a bank that makes the election allowed by paragraph (a) of this section transfers outstanding pre-disqualification loans to another corporation in a transaction to which section 381(a) applies, the acquiring corporation (the acquiror) must follow the rules of paragraph (d)(2)(i) or (ii) of this section.

(i) Acquiror completes cut-off method of change. Except as provided in paragraph (d)(2)(ii) of this section, the acquiror steps into the shoes of the transferor in the section 381(a) transaction with respect to using the cut-off method of change. Thus, the transferor's bad debt reserve immediately before the section 381(a) transaction carries over to the acquiror, and the acquiror must complete the cut-off method begun by the transferor. For purposes of completing the transferor's cut-off method, the acquiror's balance of outstanding pre-disqualification loans immediately after the section 381(a) transaction is the balance of these loans that it receives in the transaction, and the acquiror assumes all of the transferor's rights and obligations under this section.

(ii) Acquiror uses reserve method. If the acquiror is not a large bank (within the meaning of §1.585-5(b)) immediately after the section 381(a) transaction and uses a reserve method of accounting for bad debts attributable to the pre-disqualification loans (and any other loans) received in the transaction, the acquiror does not step into the shoes of the transferor with respect to using the cut-off method of change. The transferor's bad debt reserve immediately before the section 381(a) transaction carries over to the acquiror, but the acquiror does not continue the cut-off method begun by the transferor. If the six-year moving average amount (as defined in §1.585-2(c)(1)(ii)) for all of the loans received in the transaction exceeds the balance of the reserve that carries over to the acquiror, the acquiror increases this balance by the amount of the excess. Any such increase in the reserve results in a negative section 481(a) adjustment that is taken into account as required under section 381.

(3) Dispositions intended to change the status of pre-disqualification loans. This paragraph (d)(3) applies if a bank that makes the election allowed by paragraph (a) of this section sells, exchanges, or otherwise disposes of a significant amount of its pre-disqualification loans (as defined in paragraph (b)(2) of this section) and a principal purpose of the transaction is to avoid the provisions of this section by increasing the amount of loans for which deductions are allowable under the specific charge-off method. If this paragraph (d)(3) applies, the District Director may disregard the disposition for purposes of paragraphs (b)(1) and (d)(1) of this section or treat the replacement loans as pre-disqualification loans. If loans are so treated as pre-disqualification loans, no deductions are allowable under the specific charge-off method for the loans, except as provided in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, and the disposition that causes the loans to be so treated may be disregarded for purposes of paragraphs (b)(1) and (d)(1) of this section. If a bank sells pre-disqualification loans and uses the proceeds of the sale to originate new loans, this paragraph (d)(3) does not apply to the transaction.

(e) Examples. The following examples illustrate the principles of this section:

Example 1. Bank M is a bank that properly elects to use the cut-off method set forth in this §1.585-7. M's disqualification year is its taxable year beginning on January 1, 1987. On December 31, 1986, M had outstanding loans of $700 million (pre-disqualification loans), and the balance in its bad debt reserve was $10 million. M must maintain its reserve for its pre-disqualification loans in accordance with §1.585-7(b), and it may not deduct any addition to this reserve for taxable year 1987 or any later year. For these years, M may deduct amounts allowed under section 166(a) for loans that it originates or acquires after December 31, 1986, and that become worthless in whole or in part.

Example 2. Assume the same facts as in Example 1. Also assume that in 1987 M collects $150 million of its pre- disqualification loans, M determines that $2 million of its pre-disqualification loans are worthless, and M recovers $1 million of pre-disqualification loans that it had previously charged against the reserve as worthless. On December 31, 1987, the balance in M's bad debt reserve is $9 million ($10 million − $2 million + $1 million), and the balance of its outstanding pre-disqualification loans is $548 million ($700 million − $150 million − $2 million).

Example 3. Assume the same facts as in Examples 1 and 2. Also assume that on December 31, 1990, the balance in M's bad debt reserve is $5 million and the balance of its outstanding pre-disqualification loans is $25 million. In 1991 M collects $21 million of its outstanding pre-disqualification loans and determines that $1 million of its outstanding pre-disqualification loans are worthless. Thus, on December 31, 1991, the balance in M's bad debt reserve is $4 million ($5 million − $1 million), and the balance of its outstanding pre-disqualification loans is $3 million ($25 million − $21 million − $1 million). Accordingly, M must include $1 million ($4 million − $3 million) in income in taxable year 1991, pursuant to §1.585-7(c). On January 1, 1992, the balance in M's reserve is $3 million ($4 million − $1 million).

Example 4. Assume the same facts as in Examples 1 through 3. Also assume that in 1992 M transfers substantially all of its assets to another corporation (N) in a transaction to which section 381(a) applies, and N is treated as a large bank under §1.585-5(b)(2) for taxable years ending after the date of the transaction. Pursuant to §1.585-7(d)(2)(i), N steps into M's shoes with respect to using the cut-off method. M's bad debt reserve immediately before the section 381(a) transaction carries over to N, and N must complete the cut-off procedure begun by M. For this purpose, N's balance of outstanding pre-disqualification loans immediately after the section 381(a) transaction is the balance of these loans that it receives from M.

Example 5. Assume the same facts as in Examples 1 through 4, except that N is not treated as a large bank after the section 381(a) transaction. Also assume that N uses the reserve method of section 585 and plans to use this method for all of the loans it acquires from M (including loans that were not pre-disqualification loans). Pursuant to §1.585-7(d)(2)(ii), M's bad debt reserve immediately before the section 381(a) transaction carries over to N in the transaction; however, N does not continue the cut-off procedure begun by M and does not treat any loan as a pre-disqualification loan. If the six-year moving average amount (as defined in §1.585-2(c)(1)(ii)) for all of N's newly acquired loans exceeds the balance of the reserve that carries over to N, N increases this balance by the amount of the excess. Any such increase in the reserve results in a negative section 481(a) adjustment that is taken into account as required under section 381.

[T.D. 8513, 58 FR 68762, Dec. 29, 1993; 59 FR 15502, Apr. 1, 1994]


© e-CFR 2019

FR | USC | CFR | eCFR