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Title 22 Part 41 → Subpart F

Title 22 → Chapter I → Subchapter E → Part 41 → Subpart F

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 22 Part 41 → Subpart F

e-CFR data is current as of April 3, 2020

Title 22Chapter ISubchapter EPart 41 → Subpart F


Title 22: Foreign Relations
PART 41—VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF NONIMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED


§41.51   Treaty trader, treaty investor, or treaty alien in a specialty occupation.

(a) Treaty trader—(1) Classification. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant treaty trader (E-1) if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E)(i) and that the alien:

(i) Will be in the United States solely to carry on trade of a substantial nature, which is international in scope, either on the alien's behalf or as an employee of a foreign person or organization engaged in trade, principally between the United States and the foreign state of which the alien is a national, (consideration being given to any conditions in the country of which the alien is a national which may affect the alien's ability to carry on such substantial trade); and

(ii) Intends to depart from the United States upon the termination of E-1 status.

(2) Employee of treaty trader. An alien employee of a treaty trader may be classified E-1 if the employee is in or is coming to the United States to engage in duties of an executive or supervisory character, or, if employed in a lesser capacity, the employee has special qualifications that make the services to be rendered essential to the efficient operation of the enterprise. The employer must be:

(i) A person having the nationality of the treaty country, who is maintaining the status of treaty trader if in the United States or, if not in the United States, would be classifiable as a treaty trader; or

(ii) An organization at least 50% owned by persons having the nationality of the treaty country who are maintaining nonimmigrant treaty trader status if residing in the United States or, if not residing in the United States, who would be classifiable as treaty traders.

(3) Spouse and children of treaty trader. The spouse and children of a treaty trader accompanying or following to join the principal alien are entitled to the same classification as the principal alien. The nationality of a spouse or child of a treaty trader is not material to the classification of the spouse or child under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E).

(4) Representative of foreign information media. Representatives of foreign information media shall first be considered for possible classification as nonimmigrants under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(I), before consideration is given to their possible classification as treaty traders under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E) and of this section.

(5) Treaty country. A treaty country is for purposes of this section a foreign state with which a qualifying Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and Navigation or its equivalent exists with the United States. A treaty country includes a foreign state that is accorded treaty visa privileges under INA 101(a)(15)(E) by specific legislation (other than the INA).

(6) Nationality of the treaty country. The authorities of the foreign state of which the alien claims nationality determine the nationality of an individual treaty trader. In the case of an organization, ownership must be traced as best as is practicable to the individuals who ultimately own the organization.

(7) Trade. The term “trade” as used in this section means the existing international exchange of items of trade for consideration between the United States and the treaty country. Existing trade includes successfully negotiated contracts binding upon the parties that call for the immediate exchange of items of trade. This exchange must be traceable and identifiable. Title to the trade item must pass from one treaty party to the other.

(8) Item of trade. Items that qualify for trade within these provisions include but are not limited to goods, services, technology, monies, international banking, insurance, transportation, tourism, communications, and some news gathering activities.

(9) Substantial trade. Substantial trade for the purposes of this section entails the quantum of trade sufficient to ensure a continuous flow of trade items between the United States and the treaty country. This continuous flow contemplates numerous exchanges over time rather than a single transaction, regardless of the monetary value. Although the monetary value of the trade item being exchanged is a relevant consideration, greater weight is given to more numerous exchanges of larger value. In the case of smaller businesses, an income derived from the value of numerous transactions that is sufficient to support the treaty trader and his or her family constitutes a favorable factor in assessing the existence of substantial trade.

(10) Principal trade. Trade shall be considered to be principal trade between the United States and the treaty country when over 50% of the volume of international trade of the treaty trader is conducted between the United States and the treaty country of the treaty trader's nationality.

(11) Executive or supervisory character. The executive or supervisory element of the employee's position must be a principal and primary function of the position and not an incidental or collateral function. Executive and/or supervisory duties grant the employee ultimate control and responsibility for the enterprise's overall operation or a major component thereof.

(i) An executive position provides the employee great authority to determine policy of and direction for the enterprise.

(ii) A position primarily of supervisory character grants the employee supervisory responsibility for a significant proportion of an enterprise's operations and does not generally involve the direct supervision of low-level employees.

(12) Special qualifications. Special qualifications are those skills and/or aptitudes that an employee in a lesser capacity brings to a position or role that are essential to the successful or efficient operation of the enterprise.

(i) The essential nature of the alien's skills to the employing firm is determined by assessing the degree of proven expertise of the alien in the area of operations involved, the uniqueness of the specific skill or aptitude, the length of experience and/or training with the firm, the period of training or other experience necessary to perform effectively the projected duties, and the salary the special qualifications can command. The question of special skills and qualifications must be determined by assessing the circumstances on a case-by-case basis.

(ii) Whether the special qualifications are essential will be assessed in light of all circumstances at the time of each visa application on a case-by-case basis. A skill that is unique at one point may become commonplace at a later date. Skills required to start up an enterprise may no longer be essential after initial operations are complete and are running smoothly. Some skills are essential only in the short-term for the training of locally hired employees. Long-term essentiality might, however, be established in connection with continuous activities in such areas as product improvement, quality control, or the provision of a service not generally available in the United States.

(13) Labor disputes. Citizens of Canada or Mexico shall not be entitled to classification under this section if the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of Labor have certified that:

(i) There is in progress a strike or lockout in the course of a labor dispute in the occupational classification at the place or intended place of employment; and

(ii) The alien has failed to establish that the alien's entry will not affect adversely the settlement of the strike or lockout or the employment of any person who is involved in the strike or lockout.

(b) Treaty investor—(1) Classification. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant treaty investor (E'2) if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E)(ii) and that the alien:

(i) Has invested or is actively in the process of investing a substantial amount of capital in bona fide enterprise in the United States, as distinct from a relatively small amount of capital in a marginal enterprise solely for the purpose of earning a living; and

(ii) Is seeking entry solely to develop and direct the enterprise; and

(iii) Intends to depart from the United States upon the termination of E'2 status.

(2) Employee of treaty investor. An alien employee of a treaty investor may be classified E-2 if the employee is in or is coming to the United States to engage in duties of an executive or supervisory character, or, if employed in a lesser capacity, the employee has special qualifications that make the services to be rendered essential to the efficient operation of the enterprise. The employer must be:

(i) A person having the nationality of the treaty country, who is maintaining the status of treaty investor if in the United States or, if not in the United States, who would be classifiable as a treaty investor; or

(ii) An organization at least 50% owned by persons having the nationality of the treaty country who are maintaining nonimmigrant treaty investor status if residing in the United States or, if not residing in the United States, who would be classifiable as treaty investors.

(3) Spouse and children of treaty investor. The spouse and children of a treaty investor accompanying or following to join the principal alien are entitled to the same classification as the principal alien. The nationality of a spouse or child of a treaty investor is not material to the classification of the spouse or child under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E).

(4) Representative of foreign information media. Representatives of foreign information media shall first be considered for possible classification as nonimmigrants under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(I), before consideration is given to their possible classification as nonimmigrants under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E) and of this section.

(5) Treaty country. A treaty country is for purposes of this section a foreign state with which a qualifying Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and Navigation or its equivalent exists with the United States. A treaty country includes a foreign state that is accorded treaty visa privileges under INA 101(a)(15)(E) by specific legislation (other than the INA).

(6) Nationality of the treaty country. The authorities of the foreign state of which the alien claims nationality determine the nationality of an individual treaty investor. In the case of an organization, ownership must be traced as best as is practicable to the individuals who ultimately own the organization.

(7) Investment. Investment means the treaty investor's placing of capital, including funds and other assets, at risk in the commercial sense with the objective of generating a profit. The treaty investor must be in possession of and have control over the capital invested or being invested. The capital must be subject to partial or total loss if investment fortunes reverse. Such investment capital must be the investor's unsecured personal business capital or capital secured by personal assets. Capital in the process of being invested or that has been invested must be irrevocably committed to the enterprise. The alien has the burden of establishing such irrevocable commitment given to the particular circumstances of each case. The alien may use any legal mechanism available, such as by placing invested funds in escrow pending visa issuance, that would not only irrevocably commit funds to the enterprise but that might also extend some personal liability protection to the treaty investor.

(8) Bona fide enterprise. The enterprise must be a real and active commercial or entrepreneurial undertaking, producing some service or commodity for profit and must meet applicable legal requirements for doing business in the particular jurisdiction in the United States.

(9) Substantial amount of capital. A substantial amount of capital constitutes that amount that is:

(i)(A) Substantial in the proportional sense, i.e., in relationship to the total cost of either purchasing an established enterprise or creating the type of enterprise under consideration;

(B) Sufficient to ensure the treaty investor's financial commitment to the successful operation of the enterprise; and

(C) Of a magnitude to support the likelihood that the treaty investor will successfully develop and direct the enterprise.

(ii) Whether an amount of capital is substantial in the proportionality sense is understood in terms of an inverted sliding scale; i.e., the lower the total cost of the enterprise, the higher, proportionately, the investment must be to meet these criteria.

(10) Marginal enterprise. A marginal enterprise is an enterprise that does not have the present or future capacity to generate more than enough income to provide a minimal living for the treaty investor and his or her family. An enterprise that does not have the capacity to generate such income but that has a present or future capacity to make a significant economic contribution is not a marginal enterprise. The projected future capacity should generally be realizable within five years from the date the alien commences normal business activity of the enterprise.

(11) Solely to develop and direct. The business or individual treaty investor does or will develop and direct the enterprise by controlling the enterprise through ownership of at least 50% of the business, by possessing operational control through a managerial position or other corporate device, or by other means.

(12) Executive or supervisory character. The executive or supervisory element of the employee's position must be a principal and primary function of the position and not an incidental or collateral function. Executive and/or supervisory duties grant the employee ultimate control and responsibility for the enterprise's overall operation or a major component thereof.

(i) An executive position provides the employee great authority to determine policy of and direction for the enterprise.

(ii) A position primarily of supervisory character grants the employee supervisory responsibility for a significant proportion of an enterprise's operations and does not generally involve the direct supervision of low-level employees.

(13) Special qualifications. Special qualifications are those skills and/or aptitudes that an employee in a lesser capacity brings to a position or role that are essential to the successful or efficient operation of the enterprise.

(i) The essential nature of the alien's skills to the employing firm is determined by assessing the degree of proven expertise of the alien in the area of operations involved, the uniqueness of the specific skill or aptitude, the length of experience and/or training with the firm, the period of training or other experience necessary to perform effectively the projected duties, and the salary the special qualifications can command. The question of special skills and qualifications must be determined by assessing the circumstances on a case-by-case basis.

(ii) Whether the special qualifications are essential will be assessed in light of all circumstances at the time of each visa application on a case-by-case basis. A skill that is unique at one point may become commonplace at a later date. Skills required to start up an enterprise may no longer be essential after initial operations are complete and are running smoothly. Some skills are essential only in the short-term for the training of locally hired employees. Long-term essentiality might, however, be established in connection with continuous activities in such areas as product improvement, quality control, or the provision of a service not generally available in the United States.

(14) Labor disputes. Citizens of Canada or Mexico shall not be entitled to classification under this section if the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of Labor have certified that:

(i) There is in progress a strike or lockout in the course of a labor dispute in the occupational classification at the place or intended place of employment; and

(ii) The alien has failed to establish that the alien's entry will not affect adversely the settlement of the strike or lockout or the employment of any person who is involved in the strike or lockout.

(c) Nonimmigrant E-3 treaty aliens in specialty occupations—(1) Classification. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant treaty alien in a specialty occupation if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E)(iii) and that the alien:

(i) Possesses the nationality of the country statutorily designated for treaty aliens in specialty occupation status;

(ii) Satisfies the requirements of INA 214(i)(1) and the corresponding regulations defining specialty occupation promulgated by the Department of Homeland Security;

(iii) Presents to a consular officer a copy of the Labor Condition Application signed by the employer and approved by the Department of Labor, and meeting the attestation requirements of INA Section 212(t)(1);

(iv) Presents to a consular officer evidence of the alien's academic or other qualifying credentials as required under INA 214(i)(1), and a job offer letter or other documentation from the employer establishing that upon entry into the United States the applicant will be engaged in qualifying work in a specialty occupation, as defined in paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this section, and that the alien will be paid the actual or prevailing wage referred to in INA 212(t)(1);

(v) Has a visa number allocated under INA 214(g)(11)(B); and,

(vi) Intends to depart upon the termination of E-3 status.

(2) Spouse and children of treaty alien in a specialty occupation. The spouse and children of a treaty alien in a specialty occupation accompanying or following to join the principal alien are, if otherwise admissible, entitled to the same classification as the principal alien. A spouse or child of a principal E-3 treaty alien need not have the same nationality as the principal in order to be classifiable under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E). Spouses and children of E-3 principals are not subject to the numerical limitations of INA 214(g)(11)(B).

[70 FR 52293, Sept. 2, 2005]

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§41.52   Information media representative.

(a) Representative of foreign press, radio, film, or other information media. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant information media representative if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(I) and is a representative of a foreign press, radio, film, or other information medium having its home office in a foreign country, the government of which grants reciprocity for similar privileges to representatives of such a medium having home offices in the United States.

(b) Classification when applicant eligible for both I visa and E visa. An alien who will be engaged in foreign information media activities in the United States and meets the criteria set forth in paragraph (a) of this section shall be classified as a nonimmigrant under INA 101(a)(15)(I) even if the alien may also be classifiable as a nonimmigrant under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E).

(c) Spouse and children of information media representative. The spouse or child of an information media representative is classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(I) if accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

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§41.53   Temporary workers and trainees.

(a) Requirements for H classification. An alien shall be classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(H) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under that section; and either

(2) With respect to the principal alien, the consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by DHS, or by the Department of Labor in the case of temporary agricultural workers, of a petition to accord such classification or of the extension by DHS of the period of authorized entry in such classification; or

(3) The consular officer is satisfied the alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Petition approval. The approval of a petition by the Department of Homeland Security or by the Department of Labor does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(c) Validity of visa. The period of validity of a visa issued on the basis of paragraph (a) to this section must not exceed the period indicated in the petition, notification, or confirmation required in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(d) Alien not entitled to H classification. The consular officer must suspend action on this alien's application and submit a report to the approving DHS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien applying for a visa under INA 101(a)(15)(H) is not entitled to the classification as approved.

(e) “Trainee” defined. The term Trainee, as used in INA 101(a)(15)(H)(iii), means a nonimmigrant alien who seeks to enter the United States temporarily at the invitation of an individual, organization, firm, or other trainer for the purpose of receiving instruction in any field of endeavor (other than graduate medical education or training), including agriculture, commerce, communication, finance, government, transportation, and the professions.

(f) Former exchange visitor. Former exchange visitors who are subject to the 2-year residence requirement of INA 212(e) are ineligible to apply for visas under INA 101(a)(15)(H) until they have fulfilled the residence requirement or obtained a waiver of the requirement.

[57 FR 31449, July 16, 1992, as amended at 61 FR 1833, Jan. 24, 1996; 65 FR 52306, Aug. 29, 2000]

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§41.54   Intracompany transferees (executives, managers, and specialized knowledge employees).

(a) Requirements for L classification. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA section 101(a)(15)(L) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under that section; and either

(2) In the case of an individual petition, the consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by DHS of a petition to accord such classification or of the extension by DHS of the period of authorized stay in such classification; or

(3) In the case of a blanket petition,

(i) The alien has presented to the consular officer official evidence of the approval by DHS of a blanket petition listing only those intracompany relationships and positions found to qualify under INA section 101(a)(15)(L);

(ii) The alien is otherwise eligible for L-1 classification pursuant to the blanket petition; and,

(iii) The alien requests that he or she be accorded such classification for the purpose of being transferred to, or remaining in, qualifying positions identified in such blanket petition; or

(4) The consular officer is satisfied the alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Petition approval. The approval of a petition by DHS does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(c) Alien not entitled to L-1 classification under individual petition. The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and submit a report to the approving DHS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien applying for a visa as the beneficiary of an approved individual petition under INA section 101(a)(15)(L) is not entitled to such classification as approved.

(d) Labor disputes. Citizens of Canada or Mexico shall not be entitled to classification under this section if the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of Labor have certified that:

(1) There is in progress a strike or lockout in the course of a labor dispute in the occupational classification at the place or intended place of employment; and,

(2) The alien has failed to establish that the alien's entry will not affect adversely the settlement of the strike or lockout or the employment of any person who is involved in the strike or lockout.

(e) Alien not entitled to L-1 classification under blanket petition. The consular officer shall deny L classification based on a blanket petition if the documentation presented by the alien claiming to be a beneficiary thereof does not establish to the satisfaction of the consular officer that

(1) The alien has been continuously employed by the same employer, an affiliate or a subsidiary thereof, for one year within the three years immediately preceding the application for the L visa;

(2) The alien was rendering services in a capacity that is managerial, executive, or involves specialized knowledge throughout that year; or

(3) The alien is destined to render services in such a capacity, as identified in the petition and in an organization listed in the petition.

(f) Former exchange visitor. Former exchange visitors who are subject to the two-year foreign residence requirement of INA section 212(e) are ineligible to apply for visas under INA section 101(a)(15)(L) until they have fulfilled the residence requirement or obtained a waiver of the requirement.

[77 FR 8120, Feb. 14, 2012]

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§41.55   Aliens with extraordinary ability.

(a) Requirements for O classification. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(O) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section; and either

(2) With respect to the principal alien, the consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by DHS of a petition to accord such classification or of the extension by DHS of the period of authorized stay in such classification; or

(3) The consular officer is satisfied the alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Approval of visa. The approval of a petition by DHS does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(c) Validity of visa. The period of validity of a visa issued on the basis of paragraph (a) to this section must not exceed the period indicated in the petition, notification, or confirmation required in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(d) Alien not entitled to O classification. The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and submit a report to the approving DHS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien applying for a visa under INA 101(a)(15)(O) is not entitled to the classification as approved.

[57 FR 31450, July 16, 1992, as amended at 61 FR 1833, Jan. 24, 1996]

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§41.56   Athletes, artists and entertainers.

(a) Requirements for P classification. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(P) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section; and either

(2) With respect to the principal alien, the consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by DHS of a petition to accord such classification or of the extension by DHS of the period of authorized stay in such classification; or

(3) The consular officer is satisfied the alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Approval of visa. The approval of a petition by DHS does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(c) Validity of visa. The period of validity of a visa issued on the basis of paragraph (a) to this section must not exceed the period indicated in the petition, confirmation, or extension of stay required in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(d) Alien not entitled to P classification. The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and submit a report to the approving DHS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien applying for a visa under INA 101(a)(15)(P) is not entitled to the classification as approved.

[57 FR 31450, July 16, 1992, as amended at 61 FR 1833, Jan. 24, 1996]

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§41.57   International cultural exchange visitors and visitors under the Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act (IPPCTPA).

(a) International cultural exchange visitors—(1) Requirements for classification under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(i). A consular officer may classify an alien under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(Q)(i) if:

(i) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section, and

(ii) The consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by DHS of a petition or the extension by DHS of the period of authorized stay in such classification.

(2) Approval of petition. DHS approval of a petition does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(3) Validity of visa. The period of validity of a visa issued on the basis of this paragraph (a) must not exceed the period indicated in the petition, notification, or confirmation required in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(4) Alien not entitled to Q classification. The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and submit a report to the approving DHS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien does not qualify under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(i).

(b) Trainees under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(ii)—(1) Requirements for classification under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(ii). A consular officer may classify an alien under the provisions of INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(ii) if:

(i) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section;

(ii) The consular officer has received a certification letter prepared by a program administration charged by the Department of State in consultation with the Department of Justice with the operation of the Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program (IPPCTP) which establishes at a minimum:

(A) The name of the alien's employer in the United States, and, if applicable, in Ireland or Northern Ireland;

(B) If the alien is participating in the IPPCTP as an unemployed alien, that the employment in the United States is in an occupation designated by the employment and training administration of the alien's place of residence as being most beneficial to the local economy;

(C) That the program administrator has accepted the alien into the program;

(D) That the alien has been physically resident in Northern Ireland or in the counties of Louth, Monaghan, Cavan, Leitrim, Sligo, and Donegal in the Republic of Ireland and the length of time immediately prior to the issuance of the letter that the alien has claimed such place as his or her residence;

(E) The alien's date and place of birth;

(F) If the alien is participating in the IPPCTP as an already employed participant, the length of time immediately prior to the issuance of the letter that the alien has been employed by an employer in the alien's place of physical residence;

(iii) If applicable, the consular officer is satisfied the alien is the spouse or child of an alien classified under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(ii), and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(2) Aliens not entitled to such classification. The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and notify the alien and the designated program administrator described in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien does not qualify under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(ii).

[65 FR 14770, Mar. 17, 2000, as amended at 66 FR 52502, Oct. 16, 2001]

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§41.58   Aliens in religious occupations.

(a) Requirements for “R” classification. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(R) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section; and

(2) With respect to the principal alien, the consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by USCIS of a petition to accord such classification or the extension by USCIS of the period of authorized stay in such classification; or

(3) The alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Petition approval. The approval of a petition by USCIS does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(c) Validity of visa. The period of validity of a visa issued on the basis of paragraph (a) to this section must not precede or exceed the period indicated in the petition, notification, or confirmation required in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(d) Aliens not entitled to classification under INA 101(a)(15)(R). The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and submit a report to the approving USCIS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien applying for a visa under INA 101(a)(15)(R) is not entitled to the classification as approved.

[74 FR 51237, Oct. 6, 2009]

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§41.59   Professionals under the North American Free Trade Agreement.

(a) Requirements for classification as a NAFTA professional. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA 214(e) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section; and

(2) The alien shall have presented to the consular officer sufficient evidence of an offer of employment in the United States requiring employment of a person in a professional capacity consistent with NAFTA Chapter 16 Annex 1603 Appendix 1603.D.1 and sufficient evidence that the alien possesses the credentials of that profession as listed in said appendix; or

(3) The alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified in accordance with paragraph (a)(2) of this section and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Visa validity. The period of validity of a visa issued pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section may not exceed the period established on a reciprocal basis.

(c) Temporary entry. Temporary entry means an entry into the United States without the intent to establish permanent residence. The alien must satisfy the consular officer that the proposed stay is temporary. A temporary period has a reasonable, finite end that does not equate to permanent residence. The circumstances surrounding an application should reasonably and convincingly indicate that the alien's temporary work assignment in the United States will end predictably and that the alien will depart upon completion of the assignment.

(d) Labor disputes. Citizens of Canada or Mexico shall not be entitled to classification under this section if the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of Labor have certified that:

(1) There is in progress a strike or lockout in the course of a labor dispute in the occupational classification at the place or intended place of employment; and

(2) The alien has failed to establish that the alien's entry will not affect adversely the settlement of the strike or lockout or the employment of any person who is involved in the strike or lockout.

[58 FR 68527, Dec. 28, 1993, as amended at 63 FR 10305, Mar. 3, 1998; 79 FR 7583, Feb. 10, 2014]

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