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Title 22 Part 41 → Subpart D

Title 22 → Chapter I → Subchapter E → Part 41 → Subpart D

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 22 Part 41 → Subpart D

e-CFR data is current as of April 2, 2020

Title 22Chapter ISubchapter EPart 41 → Subpart D


Title 22: Foreign Relations
PART 41—VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF NONIMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED


§41.31   Temporary visitors for business or pleasure.

(a) Classification. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant visitor for business (B-1) or pleasure (B-2) if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(B), and that:

(1) The alien intends to leave the United States at the end of the temporary stay (consular officers are authorized, if departure of the alien as required by law does not seem fully assured, to require the posting of a bond with the Secretary of Homeland Security in a sufficient sum to ensure that at the end of the temporary visit, or upon failure to maintain temporary visitor status, or any status subsequently acquired under INA 248, the alien will depart from the United States);

(2) The alien has permission to enter a foreign country at the end of the temporary stay; and

(3) Adequate financial arrangements have been made to enable the alien to carry out the purpose of the visit to and departure from the United States.

(b) Definitions. (1) The term “business,” as used in INA 101(a)(15)(B), refers to conventions, conferences, consultations and other legitimate activities of a commercial or professional nature. It does not include local employment or labor for hire. For the purposes of this section building or construction work, whether on-site or in plant, shall be deemed to constitute purely local employment or labor for hire; provided that the supervision or training of others engaged in building or construction work (but not the actual performance of any such building or construction work) shall not be deemed to constitute purely local employment or labor for hire if the alien is otherwise qualified as a B-1 nonimmigrant. An alien seeking to enter as a nonimmigrant for employment or labor pursuant to a contract or other prearrangement is required to qualify under the provisions of §41.53. An alien of distinguished merit and ability seeking to enter the United States temporarily with the idea of performing temporary services of an exceptional nature requiring such merit and ability, but having no contract or other prearranged employment, may be classified as a nonimmigrant temporary visitor for business.

(2)(i) The term pleasure, as used in INA 101(a)(15)(B) for the purpose of visa issuance, refers to legitimate activities of a recreational character, including tourism, amusement, visits with friends or relatives, rest, medical treatment, and activities of a fraternal, social, or service nature, and does not include obtaining a visa for the primary purpose of obtaining U.S. citizenship for a child by giving birth in the United States.

(ii) Any visa applicant who seeks medical treatment in the United States under this provision shall be denied a visa under INA section 214(b) if unable to establish, to the satisfaction of a consular officer, a legitimate reason why he or she wishes to travel to the United States for medical treatment, that a medical practitioner or facility in the United States has agreed to provide treatment, and that the applicant has reasonably estimated the duration of the visit and all associated costs. The applicant also shall be denied a visa under INA section 214(b) if unable to establish to the satisfaction of the consular officer that he or she has the means derived from lawful sources and intent to pay for the medical treatment and all incidental expenses, including transportation and living expenses, either independently or with the pre-arranged assistance of others.

(iii) Any B nonimmigrant visa applicant who a consular officer has reason to believe will give birth during her stay in the United States is presumed to be traveling for the primary purpose of obtaining U.S. citizenship for the child.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987; 53 FR 9172, Mar. 21, 1988, as amended at 85 FR 4225, Jan. 24, 2020]

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§41.32   Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing identification cards; combined border crossing identification cards and B-1/B-2 visitor visas.

(a) Combined B-1/B-2 visitor visa and border crossing identification card (B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC)—(1) Authorization for issuance. Consular officers assigned to a consular office in Mexico designated by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Visa Services for such purpose may issue a border crossing identification card, as that term is defined in INA 101(a)(6), in combination with a B-1/B-2 nonimmigrant visitor visa (B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC), to a nonimmigrant alien who:

(i) Is a citizen and resident of Mexico;

(ii) Seeks to enter the United States as a temporary visitor for business or pleasure as defined in INA 101(a)(15)(B) for periods of stay not exceeding six months;

(iii) Is otherwise eligible for a B-1 or a B-2 temporary visitor visa.

(2) Procedure for application. Mexican applicants shall apply for a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC at any U.S. consular office in Mexico designated by the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Visa Services pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section to accept such applications. The application shall be submitted electronically on Form DS-160 or, as directed by a consular officer, on Form DS-156. If submitted electronically, it must be signed electronically by clicking the box designated “Sign Application” in the certification section of the application.

(3) Personal appearance. Each applicant shall appear in person before a consular officer to be interviewed regarding eligibility for a visitor visa, unless the consular officer waives personal appearance.

(4) Issuance and format. A B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued on or after April 1, 1998, shall consist of a card, Form DSP-150, containing a machine-readable biometric identifier. It shall contain the following data:

(i) Post symbol;

(ii) Number of the card;

(iii) Date of issuance;

(iv) Indicia “B-1/B-2 Visa and Border Crossing Card”;

(v) Name, date of birth, and sex of the person to whom issued; and

(vi) Date of expiration.

(b) Validity. A BCC previously issued by a consular officer in Mexico on Form I-186, Nonresident Alien Mexican Border Crossing Card, or Form I-586, Nonresident Alien Border Crossing Card, is valid until the expiration date on the card (if any) unless previously revoked, but not later than the date, currently October 1, 2001, on which a machine-readable, biometric identifier in the card is required in order for the card to be usable for entry. The BCC portion of a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued to a Mexican national pursuant to provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998 is valid until the date of expiration, unless previously revoked, but not later than the date, currently October 1, 2001, on which a machine-readable, biometric identifier in the card is required in order for the card to be usable for entry.

(c) Revocation. A consular or immigration officer may revoke a BCC issued on Form I-186 or Form I-586, or a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC under the provisions of §41.122, or if the consular or immigration officer determines that the alien to whom any such document was issued has ceased to be a resident and/or a citizen of Mexico. Upon revocation, the consular or immigration officer shall notify the issuing consular or immigration office. If the revoked document is a card, the consular or immigration officer shall take possession of the card and physically cancel it under standard security conditions. If the revoked document is a stamp in a passport the consular or immigration officer shall write or stamp “canceled” on the face of the document.

(d) Voidance. (1) The voiding pursuant to INA 222(g) of the visa portion of a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued at any time by a consular officer in Mexico under provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, also voids the BCC portion of that document.

(2) A BCC issued at any time by a consular officer in Mexico under any provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, is void if a consular or immigration officer determines that the alien has violated the conditions of the alien's admission into the United States, including the period of stay authorized by the Secretary of Homeland Security.

(3) A consular or immigration officer shall immediately take possession of a card determined to be void under paragraphs (d) (1) or (2) of this section and physically cancel it under standard security conditions. If the document voided in paragraphs (d) (1) or (2) is in the form of a stamp in a passport the officer shall write or stamp “canceled” across the face of the document.

(e) Replacement. When a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued under the provisions of this section, or a BCC or B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued under any provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, has been lost, mutilated, destroyed, or expired, the person to whom such card was issued may apply for a new B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC as provided in this section.

[64 FR 45163, Aug. 19, 1999, as amended at 71 FR 30591, May 30, 2006; 71 FR 34521, June 15, 2006; 73 FR 23068, Apr. 29, 2008]

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§41.33   Nonresident alien Canadian border crossing identification card (BCC).

(a) Validity of Canadian BCC. A Canadian BCC or the BCC portion of a Canadian B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued to a permanent resident of Canada pursuant to provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, is valid until the date of expiration, if any, unless previously revoked, but not later than the date, currently October 1, 2001, on which a machine readable biometric identifier is required in order for a BCC to be usable for entry.

(b) Revocation of Canadian BCC. A consular or immigration officer may revoke a BCC or a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued in Canada at any time under the provisions of §41.122, or if the consular or immigration officer determines that the alien to whom any such document was issued has ceased to be a permanent resident of Canada. Upon revocation, the consular or immigration officer shall notify the issuing consular office and if the revoked document is a card, the consular or immigration officer shall take possession of the card and physically cancel it under standard security conditions. If the revoked document is a stamp in a passport the consular or immigration officer shall write or stamp “canceled” on the face of the document.

(c) Voidance. (1) The voiding pursuant to INA 222(g) of the visa portion of a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued at any time by a consular officer in Canada under provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, also voids the BCC portion of that document.

(2) A BCC issued at any time by a consular officer in Canada under any provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, is void if a consular or immigration officer finds that the alien has violated the conditions of the alien's admission into the United States, including the period of stay authorized by the Secretary of Homeland Security.

(3) A consular or immigration officer shall immediately take possession of a card determined to be void under paragraphs (c) (1) or (2) of this section and physically cancel it under standard security conditions. If the document voided under paragraphs (c) (1) or (2) is in the form of a stamp in a passport the officer shall write or stamp “canceled” across the face of the document.

[64 FR 45164, Aug. 19, 1999]

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