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Title 22 Part 3 → §3.9

Title 22 → Chapter I → Subchapter A → Part 3 → §3.9

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 22 Part 3 → §3.9

e-CFR data is current as of April 2, 2020

Title 22Chapter ISubchapter APart 3 → §3.9


Title 22: Foreign Relations
PART 3—GIFTS AND DECORATIONS FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS


§3.9   Disposal of gifts and decorations which become the property of the United States.

(a) Gifts and decorations which have been reported to an employing agency shall either be returned to the donor or kept in safe storage pending receipt of instructions from the General Services Administration for transfer, donation or other disposal under the provisions of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, 63 Stat. 377, as amended, and the Federal Property Management Regulations (41 CFR part 101-49). The employing agency shall examine each gift or decoration and the circumstances surrounding its donation and assess whether any adverse effect upon the foreign relations of the United States might result from a return of the gift (or decoration) to the donor, which shall be the preferred means of disposal. If this is not deemed feasible, the employing agency is required by GSA regulations to report deposit of the gift or decoration within 30 calendar days, using Standard Form 120, Report of Excess Personal Property and, as necessary, Standard Form 120A, Continuation Sheet, and citing section 7342 of title 5, U.S. Code (1976), on the reporting document. Such reports shall be submitted to the General Services Administration, Washington National Capital Region (WDPO), Attention: Federal Property Resources Service, Seventh and D Streets, SW., Washington, DC 20407.

(b) No gift or decoration deposited with the General Services Administration for disposal may be sold without the approval of the Secretary of State, upon a determination that the sale will not adversely affect the foreign relations of the United States. When depositing gifts or decorations with the designated depository office of their employing agency, employees may indicate their interest in participating in any subsequent sale of the items by the Government. Before gifts and decorations may be considered for sale by the General Services Administration, however, they must first have been offered for transfer to Federal agencies and for donation to the States. Consequently, employees should understand that there is no assurance that an item will be offered for sale, or, if so offered, that it will be feasible for an employee to participate in the sale. Employees are reminded in this connection that the primary aim of the Act is to discourage employees' acceptance of gifts of more than minimal value.