';


Title 22 Part 201 → Subpart G → §201.63

Title 22 → Chapter II → Part 201 → Subpart G → §201.63

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 22 Part 201 → Subpart G → §201.63

e-CFR data is current as of April 2, 2020

Title 22Chapter IIPart 201Subpart G → §201.63


Title 22: Foreign Relations
PART 201—RULES AND PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO COMMODITY TRANSACTIONS FINANCED BY USAID
Subpart G—Price Provisions


§201.63   Maximum prices for commodities.

(a) U.S. prevailing market price—U.S. source. The purchase price for a commodity, the source of which is the United States, shall not exceed the market price prevailing in comparable export sales in the United States at the time of purchase, adjusted for differences in the transportation cost: Provided, however, That if there are no such comparable export sales, then the purchase price, excluding transportation cost, may not exceed the market price prevailing in comparable domestic sales in the United States at the time of purchase, adjusted upward or downward by the appropriate export differential.

(b) U.S. prevailing market price—non-U.S. source. The purchase price, including transportation cost, for a commodity the source of which is not the United States shall be lower than the market price prevailing in comparable export sales in the United States at the time of purchase including transportation cost: Provided, however, That if there are no such comparable export sales in the United States, then the purchase price from the source outside the United States, including transportation cost, must be lower than the market price prevailing in comparable domestic sales in the United States at the time of purchase, adjusted upward or downward by the appropriate export differential and transportation cost.

(c) Supplier's comparable export price—U.S. and non-U.S. sources. (1) The purchase price excluding transportation cost, shall not exceed prices generally charged by the supplier in comparable export sales from the source country at the time of purchase.

(2) The requirement in paragraph (c)(1) of this section shall not apply to the purchase price:

(i) In any sale under formal competitive bid procedures; or

(ii) In any sale of a commodity generally traded on an organized commodity exchange.

(3) Comparable export sales for the purpose of paragraph (c) of this section shall not include sales:

(i) Under formal competitive bid procedures; or

(ii) Of a commodity by a supplier to affiliates if the supplier demonstrates an established practice of selling the commodity to affiliates at prices lower than the prices it charges to nonaffiliates.

(d) Source country prevailing market price—non-U.S. source. The purchase price, excluding transportation cost, shall not exceed the market price prevailing in the source country in comparable export sales at the time of purchase: Provided, however, That, if there are no such comparable export sales, then the purchase price, excluding transportation cost, shall not exceed the market price prevailing in comparable domestic sales in the source country at the time of purchase, adjusted upward or downward by the appropriate export differential.

(e) Price test in the absence of comparable sales at time of purchase—(1) Sale by supplier who is not the producer. The purchase price shall not exceed the sum of:

(i) The lower of the following: The price paid by the supplier for the commodity or the price charged by the producer in the original sale of that specific commodity; and

(ii) A markup over the amount allowed in paragraph (e)(1)(i) of this section which may not exceed the lower of the following: The markup over direct cost that is usual and customary in sales by the supplier of the same commodity, if any, or the most similar commodity, or, the markup over direct cost that is usual and customary in such sales by the competitors of the supplier; and

(iii) To the extent not included in paragraph (e)(1)(i) of this section an amount not to exceed the cost at prevailing rates of those expenses recognized in §201.64(a) and actually incurred in moving the commodities supplied from the point of purchase to a position alongside or on board the vessel or other export conveyance at point of export.

(2) Sale by a supplier who is the producer. The purchase price shall not exceed a price established in accordance with the customary pricing practices of the supplier for other products of the same general class as the commodity sold.

(f) Additional rules for sales through or out of a free port or bonded warehouse. (1) The purchase price, including transportation costs to a cooperating country, of a commodity which has passed through a free port or bonded warehouse shall not exceed:

(i) The maximum price f.o.b. or f.a.s. source country eligible for USAID-financing under the foregoing provisions of this §201.63: plus

(ii) Transportation cost calculated on the basis of the prevailing ocean freight rate for shipments using the most direct route from the source country to the cooperating country on the type and flag of vessel on which the commodity actually moved from the free port or bonded warehouse to the cooperating country.

(2) The purchase price of a commodity f.o.b. or f.a.s. a free port or bonded warehouse shall not exceed the maximum price established in paragraph (f)(1) of this section, minus transportation costs from the free port or bonded warehouse to the cooperating country, calculated on the basis of the prevailing ocean freight rate from the free port or bonded warehouse to the cooperating country for the type and flag of vessel on which the commodity actually moved between those points.

(g) Commodity price subject to escalation. If a purchase contract contains a price escalation clause, USAID will finance:

(1) The purchase price of the commodity before the operation of the escalation clause to the extent that it does not exceed the applicable price limitations contained in this subpart; and

(2) That portion of the commodity price attributable to the operation of the price escalation clause if such clause:

(i) Uses a formula based on variations in a cost factor which is reasonably related to the price of the commodity subject to escalation and is readily determinable;

(ii) Provides for downward as well as upward adjustment of the price; and

(iii) Accords with recognized trade practices.