';


Title 22 Part 41

Title 22 → Chapter I → Subchapter E → Part 41

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 22 Part 41

e-CFR data is current as of September 16, 2019

Title 22Chapter ISubchapter E → Part 41


Title 22: Foreign Relations


PART 41—VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF NONIMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED


Contents

Subpart L—Refusals and Revocations

§41.121   Refusal of nonimmigrant visas.
§41.122   Revocation of visas.
§41.123   Discontinuance of granting nonimmigrant visa pursuant to INA 243(d).

Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2651a; 8 U.S.C. 1104, 1201, 1202, 1253; 6 U.S.C. 236; Public Law 105-277, 112 Stat. 2681-795 through 2681-801; 8 U.S.C. 1185 note (section 7209 of Pub. L. 108-458, as amended by section 546 of Pub. L. 109-295).

Source: 52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, unless otherwise noted.

Editorial Note: Nomenclature changes to part 41 appear at 71 FR 34521 and 34522, June 15, 2006.

return arrow Back to Top

Subpart A—Passport and Visas Not Required for Certain Nonimmigrants

§41.0   Definitions.

For purposes of this part and part 53:

Adjacent islands means Bermuda and the islands located in the Caribbean Sea, except Cuba.

Cruise ship means a passenger vessel over 100 gross tons, carrying more than 12 passengers for hire, making a voyage lasting more than 24 hours any part of which is on the high seas, and for which passengers are embarked or disembarked in the United States or its territories.

Ferry means any vessel operating on a pre-determined fixed schedule and route, which is being used solely to provide transportation between places that are no more than 300 miles apart and which is being used to transport passengers, vehicles, and/or railroad cars.

Pleasure vessel means a vessel that is used exclusively for recreational or personal purposes and not to transport passengers or property for hire.

United States means “United States” as defined in section 215(c) of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, as amended (8 U.S.C. 1185(c)).

U.S. citizen means a United States citizen or a U.S. non-citizen national.

United States qualifying tribal entity means a tribe, band, or other group of Native Americans formally recognized by the United States Government which agrees to meet WHTI document standards.

[73 FR 18418, Apr. 3, 2008]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.1   Exemption by law or treaty from passport and visa requirements.

Nonimmigrants in the following categories are exempt from the passport and visa requirements of INA 212(a)(7)(B)(i)(I), (i)(II):

(a) Alien members of the U.S. Armed Forces. An alien member of the U.S. Armed Forces in uniform or bearing proper military identification, who has not been lawfully admitted for permanent residence, coming to the United States under official orders or permit of such Armed Forces (Sec. 284, 86 Stat. 232; 8 U.S.C. 1354).

(b) [Reserved]

(c) Aliens entering from Guam, Puerto Rico, or the Virgin Islands. An alien departing from Guam, Puerto Rico, or the Virgin Islands of the United States, and seeking to enter the continental United States or any other place under the jurisdiction of the United States (Sec. 212, 66 Stat. 188; 8 U.S.C. 1182.)

(d) Armed Services personnel of a NATO member. Personnel belonging to the armed services of a government which is a Party to the North Atlantic Treaty and which has ratified the Agreement Between the Parties to the North Atlantic Treaty Regarding the Status of Their Forces, signed at London on June 19, 1951, and entering the United States under Article III of that Agreement pursuant to an individual or collective movement order issued by an appropriate agency of the sending state or of NATO (TIAS 2846; 4 U.S.T. 1792.)

(e) Armed Services personnel attached to a NATO headquarters in the United States. Personnel attached to a NATO Headquarters in the United States set up pursuant to the North Atlantic Treaty, belonging to the armed services of a government which is a Party to the Treaty and entering the United States in connection with their official duties under the provisions of the Protocol on the Status of International Military Headquarters Set Up Pursuant to the North Atlantic Treaty (TIAS 2978; 5 U.S.T. 875.)

(f) Aliens entering pursuant to International Boundary and Water Commission Treaty. All personnel employed either directly or indirectly on the construction, operation, or maintenance of works in the United States undertaken in accordance with the treaty concluded on February 3, 1944, between the United States and Mexico regarding the functions of the International Boundary and Water Commission, and entering the United States temporarily in connection with such employment (59 Stat. 1252; TS 994.)

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 56 FR 30428, July 2, 1991; 61 FR 1835, Jan. 24, 1996; 71 FR 68430, Nov. 24, 2006; 73 FR 18418, Apr. 3, 2008]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.2   Exemption or waiver by Secretary of State and Secretary of Homeland Security of passport and/or visa requirements for certain categories of nonimmigrants.

Pursuant to the authority of the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Homeland Security under the INA, as amended, a passport and/or visa is not required for the following categories of nonimmigrants:

(a) Canadian citizens. A visa is not required for an American Indian born in Canada having at least 50 percentum of blood of the American Indian race. A visa is not required for other Canadian citizens except for those who apply for admission in E, K, V, or S nonimmigrant classifications as provided in paragraphs (k) and (m) of this section and 8 CFR 212.1. A passport is required for Canadian citizens applying for admission to the United States, except when one of the following exceptions applies:

(1) NEXUS program. A Canadian citizen who is traveling as a participant in the NEXUS program, and who is not otherwise required to present a passport and visa as provided in paragraphs (k) and (m) of this section and 8 CFR 212.1, may present a valid NEXUS program card when using a NEXUS Air kiosk or when entering the United States from contiguous territory or adjacent islands at a land or sea port-of-entry. A Canadian citizen who enters the United States by pleasure vessel from Canada under the remote inspection system may present a NEXUS program card.

(2) FAST program. A Canadian citizen who is traveling as a participant in the FAST program, and who is not otherwise required to present a passport and visa as provided in paragraphs (k) and (m) of this section and 8 CFR 212.1, may present a valid FAST card at a land or sea port-of-entry prior to entering the United States from contiguous territory or adjacent islands.

(3) SENTRI program. A Canadian citizen who is traveling as a participant in the SENTRI program, and who is not otherwise required to present a passport and visa as provided in paragraphs (k) and (m) of this section and 8 CFR 212.1, may present a valid SENTRI card at a land or sea port-of-entry prior to entering the United States from contiguous territory or adjacent islands.

(4) Canadian Indians. If designated by the Secretary of Homeland Security, a Canadian citizen holder of an Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (“INAC”) card issued by the Canadian Department of Indian Affairs and North Development, Director of Land and Trust Services (LTS) in conformance with security standards agreed upon by the Governments of Canada and the United States, and containing a machine readable zone, and who is arriving from Canada, may present the card prior to entering the United States at a land port-of-entry.

(5) Children. A child who is a Canadian citizen who is seeking admission to the United States when arriving from contiguous territory at a sea or land port-of-entry, may present certain other documents if the arrival meets the requirements described in either paragraph (i) or (ii) of this section.

(i) Children under age 16. A Canadian citizen who is under the age of 16 is permitted to present an original or a copy of his or her birth certificate, a Canadian Citizenship Card, or a Canadian Naturalization Certificate when arriving in the United States from contiguous territory at land or sea ports-of-entry.

(ii) Groups of children under age 19. A Canadian citizen who is under age 19 and who is traveling with a public or private school group, religious group, social or cultural organization, or team associated with a youth sport organization may present an original or a copy of his or her birth certificate, a Canadian Citizenship Card, or a Canadian Naturalization Certificate when applying for admission to the United States from contiguous territory at all land and sea ports-of-entry, when the group, organization or team is under the supervision of an adult affiliated with the organization and when the child has parental or legal guardian consent to travel. For purposes of this paragraph, an adult is considered to be a person who is age 19 or older. The following requirements will apply:

(A) The group, organization, or team must provide to CBP upon crossing the border, on organizational letterhead:

(1) The name of the group, organization or team, and the name of the supervising adult;

(2) A trip itinerary, including the stated purpose of the trip, the location of the destination, and the length of stay;

(3) A list of the children on the trip;

(4) For each child, the primary address, primary phone number, date of birth, place of birth, and the name of at least one parent or legal guardian.

(B) The adult leading the group, organization, or team must demonstrate parental or legal guardian consent by certifying in the writing submitted in paragraph (a)(5)(ii)(A) of this section that he or she has obtained for each child the consent of at least one parent or legal guardian.

(C) The procedure described in this paragraph is limited to members of the group, organization, or team that are under age 19. Other members of the group, organization, or team must comply with other applicable document and/or inspection requirements found in this part and 8 CFR parts 212 and 235.

(6) Enhanced driver's license programs. Upon the designation by the Secretary of Homeland Security of an enhanced driver's license as an acceptable document to denote identity and citizenship for purposes of entering the United States, Canadian citizens may be permitted to present these documents in lieu of a passport when seeking admission to the United States according to the terms of the agreements entered between the Secretary of Homeland Security and the entity. The Secretary of Homeland Security will announce, by publication of a notice in the Federal Register, documents designated under this paragraph. A list of the documents designated under this paragraph will also be made available to the public.

(b) Citizens of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda. A visa is not required, except for Citizens of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda who apply for admission in E, K, V, or S nonimmigrant visa classification as provided in paragraphs (k) and (m) of this section and 8 CFR 212.1. A passport is required for Citizens of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda applying for admission to the United States.

(c) Bahamian nationals and British subjects resident in the Bahamas. A passport is required. A visa is not required if, prior to the embarkation of such an alien for the United States on a vessel or aircraft, the examining U.S. immigration officer at Freeport or Nassau determines that the individual is clearly and beyond a doubt entitled to admission.

(d) British subjects resident in the Cayman Islands or in the Turks and Caicos Islands. A passport is required. A visa is not required if the alien arrives directly from the Cayman Islands or the Turks and Caicos Islands and presents a current certificate from the Clerk of Court of the Cayman Islands or the Turks and Caicos Islands indicating no criminal record.

(e) Nationals and residents of the British Virgin Islands. (1) A national of the British Virgin Islands and resident therein requires a passport but not a visa if proceeding to the United States Virgin Islands.

(2) A national of the British Virgin Islands and resident therein requires a passport but does not require a visa to apply for entry into the United States if such applicant:

(i) Is proceeding by aircraft directly from St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands;

(ii) Is traveling to some other part of the United States solely for the purpose of business or pleasure as described in INA 101(a)(15)(B);

(iii) Satisfies the examining U.S. Immigration officer at that port of entry that he or she is admissible in all respects other than the absence of a visa; and

(iv) Presents a current certificate issued by the Royal Virgin Islands Police Force indicating that he or she has no criminal record.

(f) Mexican nationals. (1) A visa and a passport are not required of a Mexican national who is applying for admission from Mexico as a temporary visitor for business or pleasure at a land port-of-entry, or arriving by pleasure vessel or ferry, if the national is in possession of a Form DSP-150, B-1/B-2 Visa and Border Crossing Card, containing a machine-readable biometric identifier, issued by the Department of State.

(2) A visa and a passport are not required of a Mexican national who is applying for admission from contiguous territory or adjacent islands at a land or sea port-of-entry, if the national is a member of the Texas Band of Kickapoo Indians or Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma who is in possession of a Form I-872 American Indian Card issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

(3) A visa is not required of a Mexican national employed as a crew member on an aircraft belonging to a Mexican company authorized to engage in commercial transportation into the United States.

(4) A visa is not required of a Mexican national bearing a Mexican diplomatic or official passport who is a military or civilian official of the Federal Government of Mexico entering the United States for a stay of up to 6 months for any purpose other than on assignment as a permanent employee to an office of the Mexican Federal Government in the United States. A visa is also not required of the official's spouse or any of the official's dependent family members under 19 years of age who hold diplomatic or official passports and are in the actual company of the official at the time of entry. This waiver does not apply to the spouse or any of the official's family members classifiable under INA 101(a)(15) (F) or (M).

(g) Natives and residents of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. A visa and a passport are not required of a native and resident of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands who has proceeded in direct and continuous transit from the Trust Territory to the United States.

(h) [Reserved]

(i) Individual cases of unforeseen emergencies. Except as provided in paragraphs (a) through (h) and (j) through (l) of this section, all nonimmigrants are required to present a valid, unexpired visa and passport upon arrival in the United States. A nonimmigrant may apply for a waiver of the visa and passport requirement if, either prior to the nonimmigrant's embarkation abroad or upon arrival at a port of entry, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) district director concludes that the nonimmigrant is unable to present the required documents because of an unforeseen emergency. The CBP district director may grant a waiver of the visa or passport requirement pursuant to INA 212(d)(4)(A), without the prior concurrence of the Department of State, if the CBP district director concludes that the nonimmigrant's claim of emergency circumstances is legitimate and that approval of the waiver would be appropriate under all of the attendant facts and circumstances.

(j) Fiance(e) of a U.S. citizen. Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraphs (a) through (h) of this section, a visa is required of an alien described in such paragraphs who is classified, or who seeks classification, under INA 101(a)(15)(K).

(k) Visa waiver program. (1) A visa is not required of any person who seeks admission to the United States for a period of 90 days or less as a visitor for business or pleasure and who is eligible to apply for admission to the United States as a Visa Waiver Program applicant. (For the list of countries whose nationals are eligible to apply for admission to the United States as Visa Waiver Program applicants, see 8 CFR 217.2(a)).

(2) An alien denied admission under the Visa Waiver Program by virtue of a ground of inadmissibility described in INA section 212(a) that is discovered at the time of the alien's application for admission at a port of entry or through use of an automated electronic database may apply for a visa as the only means of challenging such a determination. A consular officer must accept and adjudicate any such application if the alien otherwise fulfills all of the application requirements contained in part 41, §41.2(l)(1).

(l) Treaty Trader and Treaty Investor. Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph (a) of this section, a visa is required of a Canadian national who is classified, or who seeks classification, under INA 101(a)(15)(E).

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987]

Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §41.2, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.govinfo.gov.

return arrow Back to Top

§41.3   Waiver by joint action of consular and immigration officers of passport and/or visa requirements.

Under the authority of INA 212(d)(4), the documentary requirements of INA 212(a)(7)(B)(i)(I), (i)(II) may be waived for any alien in whose case the consular officer serving the port or place of embarkation, or the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Visa Services or his or her designee, is satisfied after consultation with, and concurrence by, the appropriate immigration officer, that the case falls within any of the following categories:

(a) Residents of foreign contiguous territory; visa and passport waiver. An alien residing in foreign contiguous territory who does not qualify for any waiver provided in §41.1 and is a member of a visiting group or excursion proceeding to the United States under circumstances which make it impractical to procure a passport and visa in a timely manner.

(b) Aliens for whom passport extension facilities are unavailable; passport waiver. As alien whose passport is not valid for the period prescribed in INA 212(a)(7)(B)(i)(I) and who is embarking for the United States at a port or place remote from any establishment at which the passport could be revalidated.

(c) Aliens precluded from obtaining passport extensions by foreign government restrictions; passport waiver. An alien whose passport is not valid for the period prescribed in INA 212(a)(7)(B)(i)(I) and whose government, as a matter of policy, does not revalidate passports more than 6 months prior to expiration or until the passport expires.

(d) Emergent circumstances; visa waiver. An alien well and favorably known at the consular office, who was previously issued a nonimmigrant visa which has expired, and who is proceeding directly to the United States under emergent circumstances which preclude the timely issuance of a visa.

(e) Members of armed forces and coast guards of foreign countries; visa and passport waiver. An alien on active duty in the armed forces or coast guard of a foreign country and a member of a group of such armed forces or coast guard traveling to the United States, on behalf of the alien's government or the United Nations, under arrangements made with the appropriate military authorities of the United States, coordinated within the U.S. Government by those U.S. military authorities, and approved by the Department of State and the Department of Homeland Security for such visit.

(f) Landed immigrants in Canada; passport waiver. An alien applying for a visa at a consular office in Canada:

(1) Who is a landed immigrant in Canada;

(2) Whose port and date of expected arrival in the United States are known; and

(3) Who is proceeding to the United States under emergent circumstances which preclude the timely procurement of a passport or Canadian certificate of identity.

(g) Authorization to individual consular office; visa and/or passport waiver. An alien within the district of a consular office which has been authorized by the Department, because of unusual circumstances prevailing in that district, to join with immigration officers abroad in waivers of documentary requirements in specific categories of cases, and whose case falls within one of those categories.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 56 FR 30428, July 2, 1991; 60 FR 30188, June 8, 1995; 61 FR 1835, Jan. 24, 1996; 63 FR 48577, Sept. 11, 1998; 79 FR 19289, Apr. 8, 2014]

return arrow Back to Top

Subpart B—Classification of Nonimmigrants

§41.11   Entitlement to nonimmigrant status.

(a) Presumption of immigrant status and burden of proof. An applicant for a nonimmigrant visa, other than an alien applying for a visa under INA 101(a)(15) (H)(i) or (L), shall be presumed to be an immigrant until the consular officer is satisfied that the alien is entitled to a nonimmigrant status described in INA 101(a)(15) or otherwise established by law or treaty. The burden of proof is upon the applicant to establish entitlement for nonimmigrant status and the type of nonimmigrant visa for which application is made.

(b) Aliens unable to establish nonimmigrant status. (1) A nonimmigrant visa shall not be issued to an alien who has failed to overcome the presumption of immigrant status established by INA 214(b).

(2) In a borderline case in which an alien appears to be otherwise entitled to receive a visa under INA 101(a)(15)(B) or (F) but the consular officer concludes that the maintenance of the alien's status or the departure of the alien from the United States as required is not fully assured, a visa may nevertheless be issued upon the posting of a bond with the Secretary of Homeland Security under terms and conditions prescribed by the consular officer.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 61 FR 1835, Jan. 24, 1996]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.12   Classification symbols.

A visa issued to a nonimmigrant alien within one of the classes described in this section shall bear an appropriate visa symbol to show the classification of the alien. The symbol shall be inserted in the space provided on the visa. The following visa symbols shall be used:

SymbolClassSection of law
A1Ambassador, Public Minister, Career Diplomat or Consular Officer, or Immediate Family101(a)(15)(A)(i).
A2Other Foreign Government Official or Employee, or Immediate Family101(a)(15)(A)(ii).
A3Attendant, Servant, or Personal Employee of A1 or A2, or Immediate Family101(a)(15)(A)(iii).
B1Temporary Visitor for Business101(a)(15)(B).
B2Temporary Visitor for Pleasure101(a)(15)(B).
B1/B2Temporary Visitor for Business & Pleasure101(a)(15)(B).
C1Alien in Transit101(a)(15)(C).
C1/DCombined Transit and Crewmember Visa101(a)(15)(C) and (D).
C2Alien in Transit to United Nations Headquarters District Under Sec. 11.(3), (4), or (5) of the Headquarters Agreement101(a)(15)(C).
C3Foreign Government Official, Immediate Family, Attendant, Servant or Personal Employee, in Transit212(d)(8).
DCrewmember (Sea or Air)101(a)(15)(D).
E1Treaty Trader, Spouse or Child101(a)(15)(E)(i).
E2Treaty Investor, Spouse or Child101(a)(15)(E)(ii).
E3Australian Treaty Alien coming to the United States Solely to Perform Services in a Specialty Occupation101(a)(15)(E)(iii).
E3DSpouse or Child of E3101(a)(15)(E)(iii).
E3RReturning E3101(a)(15)(E)(iii).
F1Student in an academic or language training program101(a)(15)(F)(i).
F2Spouse or Child of F1101(a)(15)(F)(ii).
F3Canadian or Mexican national commuter student in an academic or language training program101(a)(15)(F)(iii).
G1Principal Resident Representative of Recognized Foreign Government to International Organization, Staff, or Immediate Family101(a)(15)(G)(i).
G2Other Representative of Recognized Foreign Member Government to International Organization, or Immediate Family101(a)(15)(G)(ii).
G3Representative of Nonrecognized or Nonmember Foreign Government to International Organization, or Immediate Family101(a)(15)(G)(iii).
G4International Organization Officer or Employee, or Immediate Family101(a)(15)(G)(iv).
G5Attendant, Servant, or Personal Employee of G1 through G4, or Immediate Family101(a)(15)(G)(v).
H1BAlien in a Specialty Occupation (Profession)101(a)(15)(H)(i)(b).
H1B1Chilean or Singaporean National to Work in a Specialty Occupation101(a)(15)(H)(i)(b1).
H1CNurse in health professional shortage area101(a)(15)(H)(i)(c).
H2ATemporary Worker Performing Agricultural Services Unavailable in the United States101(a)(15)(H)(ii)(a).
H2BTemporary Worker Performing Other Services Unavailable in the United States101(a)(15)(H)(ii)(b).
H3Trainee101(a)(15)(H)(iii).
H4Spouse or Child of Alien Classified H1B/B1/C, H2A/B/R, or H-3101(a)(15)(H)(iv).
IRepresentative of Foreign Information Media, Spouse and Child101(a)(15)(I).
J1Exchange Visitor101(a)(15)(J).
J2Spouse or Child of J1101(a)(15)(J).
K1Fiance(e) of United States Citizen101(a)(15)(K)(i).
K2Child of Fiance(e) of U.S. Citizen101(a)(15)(K)(iii).
K3Spouse of U.S. citizen awaiting availability of immigrant visa101(a)(15)(K)(ii).
K4Child of K3101(a)(15)(K)(iii).
L1Intracompany Transferee (Executive, Managerial, and Specialized Knowledge Personnel Continuing Employment with International Firm or Corporation)101(a)(15)(L).
L2Spouse or Child of Intracompany Transferee101(a)(15)(L).
M1Vocational Student or Other Nonacademic Student101(a)(15)(M)(i).
M2Spouse or Child of M1101(a)(15)(M)(ii).
M3Canadian or Mexican national commuter student (Vocational student or other nonacademic student)101(a)(15)(M)(iii).
N8Parent of an Alien Classified SK3 or SN3101(a)(15)(N)(i).
N9Child of N8 or of SK1, SK2, SK4, SN1, SN2 or SN4101(a)(15)(N)(ii).
NATO 1Principal Permanent Representative of Member State to NATO (including any of its Subsidiary Bodies) Resident in the U.S. and Resident Members of Official Staff; Secretary General, Assistant Secretaries General, and Executive Secretary of NATO; Other Permanent NATO Officials of Similar Rank, or Immediate FamilyArt. 12, 5 UST 1094; Art. 20, 5 UST 1098.
NATO 2Other Representative of member state to NATO (including any of its Subsidiary Bodies) including Representatives, Advisers, and Technical Experts of Delegations, or Immediate Family; Dependents of Member of a Force Entering in Accordance with the Provisions of the NATO Status-of-Forces Agreement or in Accordance with the provisions of the “Protocol on the Status of International Military Headquarters”; Members of Such a Force if Issued VisasArt. 13, 5 UST 1094; Art. 1, 4 UST 1794; Art. 3, 4 UST 1796.
NATO 3Official Clerical Staff Accompanying Representative of Member State to NATO (including any of its Subsidiary Bodies), or Immediate FamilyArt. 14, 5 UST 1096.
NATO 4Official of NATO (Other Than Those Classifiable as NATO1), or Immediate FamilyArt. 18, 5 UST 1098.
NATO 5Experts, Other Than NATO Officials Classifiable Under NATO4, Employed in Missions on Behalf of NATO, and their DependentsArt. 21, 5 UST 1100.
NATO 6Member of a Civilian Component Accompanying a Force Entering in Accordance with the Provisions of the NATO Status-of-Forces Agreement; Member of a Civilian Component Attached to or Employed by an Allied Headquarters Under the “Protocol on the Status of International Military Headquarters” Set Up Pursuant to the North Atlantic Treaty; and their DependentsArt. 1, 4 UST 1794; Art. 3, 5 UST 877.
NATO 7Attendant, Servant, or Personal Employee of NATO1, NATO2, NATO 3, NATO4, NATO5, and NATO6 Classes, or Immediate FamilyArts. 12-20, 5 UST 1094-1098.
O1Alien with Extraordinary Ability in Sciences, Arts, Education, Business or Athletics101(a)(15)(O)(i).
O2Alien Accompanying and Assisting in the Artistic or Athletic Performance by O1101(a)(15)(O)(ii).
O3Spouse or Child of O1 or O2101(a)(15)(O)(iii).
P1Internationally Recognized Athlete or Member of Internationally Recognized Entertainment Group101(a)(15)(P)(i).
P2Artist or Entertainer in a Reciprocal Exchange Program101(a)(15)(P)(ii).
P3Artist or Entertainer in a Culturally Unique Program101(a)(15)(P)(iii).
P4Spouse or Child of P1, P2, or P3101(a)(15)(P)(iv).
Q1Participant in an International Cultural Exchange Program101(a)(15)(Q)(i).
Q2Irish Peace Program Participant101(a)(15)(Q)(ii)(I).
Q3Spouse or Child of Q2101(a)(15)(Q)(ii)(II).
R1Alien in a Religious Occupation101(a)(15)(R).
R2Spouse or Child of R1101(a)(15)(R).
S5Certain Aliens Supplying Critical Information Relating to a Criminal Organization or Enterprise101(a)(15)(S)(i).
S6Certain Aliens Supplying Critical Information Relating to Terrorism101(a)(15)(S)(ii).
S7Qualified Family Member of S5 or S6101(a)(15)(S).
T1Victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons101(a)(15)(T)(i).
T2Spouse of T1101(a)(15)(T)(ii).
T3Child of T1101(a)(15)(T)(ii).
T4Parent of a T1 under 21 years of age101(a)(15)(T)(ii).
T5Unmarried Sibling under age 18 of T1 under 21 years of age101(a)(15)(T)(ii).
T6Adult or Minor Child of a Derivative Beneficiary of a T1101(a)(15)(T)(ii).
TNNAFTA Professional214(e)(2).
TDSpouse or Child of a NAFTA Professional214(e)(2).
U1Victim of criminal activity101(a)(15)(U)(i).
U2Spouse of U1101(a)(15)(U)(ii).
U3Child of U1101(a)(15)(U)(ii).
U4Parent of U1 under 21 years of age101(a)(15)(U)(ii).
U5Unmarried Sibling under age 18 of U1 under 21 years of age101(a)(15)(U)(ii).
V1Spouse of a Lawful Permanent Resident Alien Awaiting Availability of Immigrant Visa101(a)(15)(V)(i) or 101(a)(15)(V)(ii).
V2Child of a Lawful Permanent Resident Alien Awaiting Availability Of Immigrant Visa101(a)(15)(V)(i) or 101(a)(15)(V)(ii).
V3Child of a V1 or V2203(d) & 101(a)(15)(V)(i) or 101 (a)(15)(V)(ii).

[78 FR 68992, Nov. 18, 2013]

return arrow Back to Top

Subpart C—Foreign Government Officials

§41.21   Foreign Officials—General.

(a) Definitions. In addition to pertinent INA definitions, the following definitions are applicable:

(1) Accredited, as used in INA 101(a)(15)(A), 101(a)(15)(G), and 212(d)(8), means an alien holding an official position, other than an honorary official position, with a government or international organization and possessing a travel document or other evidence of intention to enter or transit the United States to transact official business for that government or international organization.

(2) Attendants, as used in INA 101(a)(15)(A)(iii), 101(a)(15)(G)(v), and 212(d)(8), and in the definition of the NATO-7 visa symbol, means aliens paid from the public funds of a foreign government or from the funds of an international organization, accompanying or following to join the principal alien to whom a duty or service is owed.

(3) Immediate family, as used in INA 101(a)(15)(A), 101(a)(15)(G), and 212(d)(8), and in classification under the NATO visa symbols, means:

(i) The spouse who resides regularly in the household of the principal alien and is not a member of some other household;

(ii) Unmarried sons and daughters, whether by blood or adoption, who reside regularly in the household of the principal alien and who are not members of some other household, and provided that such unmarried sons and daughters are:

(A) Under the age of 21, or

(B) Under the age of 23 and in full-time attendance as students at post-secondary educational institutions; and

(iii) Other individuals who:

(A) Reside regularly in the household of the principal alien;

(B) Are not members of some other household;

(C) Are recognized as dependents of the principal alien by the sending government or international organization, as demonstrated by eligibility for rights and benefits, such as the issuance of a diplomatic or official passport, or travel or other allowances; and

(D) Are individually authorized by the Department.

(4) Servants and personal employees, as used in INA 101(a)(15)(A)(iii), 101(a)(15)(G)(v), and 212(d)(8), and in classification under the NATO-7 visa symbol, means aliens employed in a domestic or personal capacity by a principal alien, who are paid from the private funds of the principal alien and seek to enter the United States solely for the purpose of such employment.

(b) Exception to passport validity requirement for aliens in certain A, G, and NATO classes. A nonimmigrant alien for whom the passport requirement of INA 212(a)(7)(B)(i)(I) has not been waived and who is within one of the classes:

(1) Described in INA 101(a)(15)(A)(i) and (ii); or

(2) Described in INA 101(a)(15)(G)(i), (ii), (iii), and (iv); or

(3) NATO-1, NATO-2, NATO-3, NATO-4, or NATO-6 may present a passport which is valid only for a sufficient period to enable the alien to apply for admission at a port of entry prior to its expiration.

(c) Exception to passport validity requirement for foreign government officials in transit. An alien classified C-3 under INA 212(d)(8) needs to present only a valid unexpired visa and a travel document which is valid for entry into a foreign country for at least 30 days from the date of application for admission into the United States.

(d) Grounds for refusal of visas applicable to certain A, C, G, and NATO classes. (1) An A-1 or A-2 visa may not be issued to an alien the Department has determined to be persona non grata.

(2) Only the provisions of INA 212(a) cited below apply to the indicated classes of nonimmigrant visa applicants:

(i) Class A-1: INA 212(a) (3)(A), (3)(B), and (3)(C);

(ii) Class A-2: INA 212(a) (3)(A), (3)(B), and (3)(C);

(iii) Classes C-2 and C-3: INA 212(a) (3)(A), (3)(B), (3)(C), and (7)(B);

(iv) Classes G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4: INA 212(a) (3)(A), (3)(B), and (3)(C);

(v) Classes NATO-1, NATO-2, NATO-3, NATO-4, and NATO-6: INA 212(a) (3)(A), (3)(B), and (3)(C);

(3) An alien within class A-3 or G-5 is subject to all grounds of refusal specified in INA 212 which are applicable to nonimmigrants in general.

(4) Notwithstanding the visa restrictions imposed by applicable laws and consistent with a provision in such laws providing for a regulatory exception to the visa restrictions contained therein, a visa may be issued to a visa applicant who is otherwise ineligible for a visa under such laws:

(i) To permit the United States to comply with the United Nations Headquarters Agreement and other applicable international obligations; and

(ii) To permit the United States and Burma to operate their diplomatic missions, and to permit the United States to conduct other official United States Government business in Burma.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987; 53 FR 9111, Mar. 21, 1988, as amended at 56 FR 30428, July 2, 1991; 73 FR 56729, Sept. 30, 2008; 74 FR 36113, July 22, 2009; 78 FR 66815, Nov. 6, 2013; 81 FR 88102, Dec. 7, 2016]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.22   Officials of foreign governments.

(a) Criteria for classification of foreign government officials. (1) An alien is classifiable A-1 or A-2 under INA section 101(a)(15)(A) (i) or (ii) if the principal alien:

(i) Has been accredited by a foreign government recognized de jure by the United States;

(ii) Intends to engage solely in official activities for that foreign government while in the United States; and

(iii) Has been accepted by the President, the Secretary of State, or a consular officer acting on behalf of the Secretary of State.

(2) A member of the immediate family of a principal alien is classifiable A-1 or A-2 under INA section 101(a)(15)(A)(i) or (ii) if the principal alien is so classified.

(b) Classification under INA section 101(a)(15)(A). An alien entitled to classification under INA section 101(a)(15)(A) shall be classified under this section even if eligible for another nonimmigrant classification. An exception may be made where an immediate family member is classifiable as A-1 or A-2 under paragraph (a)(2) of this section is also independently classifiable as a principal under INA section 101(a)(15)(G)(i), (ii), (iii), (iv) or in NATO-1 through NATO-6 classification.

(c) Classification of attendants, servants, and personal employees. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant under INA 101(a)(15)(A)(iii) if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under those provisions.

(d) Referral to the Department of special cases concerning principal alien applicants. In any case in which there is uncertainty about the applicability of these regulations to a principal alien applicant requesting such nonimmigrant status, the matter shall be immediately referred to the Department for consideration as to whether acceptance of accreditation will be granted.

(e) Change of classification to that of a foreign government official. In the case of an alien in the United States seeking a change of nonimmigrant classification under INA 248 to a classification under INA 101(a)(15)(A) (i) or (ii), the question of acceptance of accreditation is determined by the Department.

(f) Termination of status. The Department may, in its discretion, cease to recognize as entitled to classification under INA 101(a)(15)(A) (i) or (ii) any alien who has nonimmigrant status under that provision.

(g) Classification of foreign government official. A foreign government official or employee seeking to enter the United States temporarily other than as a representative or employee of a foreign government is not classifiable under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(A).

(h) Courier and acting courier on official business—(1) Courier of career. An alien regularly and professionally employed as a courier by the government of the country to which the alien owes allegiance is classifiable as a nonimmigrant under INA 101(a)(15)(A)(i), if the alien is proceeding to the United States on official business for that government.

(2) Official acting as courier. An alien not regularly and professionally employed as a courier by the government of the country to which the alien owes allegiance is classifiable as a nonimmigrant under INA 101(a)(15)(A)(ii), if the alien is holding an official position and is proceeding to the United States as a courier on official business for that government.

(3) Nonofficial serving as courier. An alien serving as a courier but not regularly and professionally employed as such who holds no official position with, or is not a national of, the country whose government the alien is serving, shall be classified as a nonimmigrant under INA 101(a)(15)(B).

(i) Official of foreign government not recognized by the United States. An official of a foreign government not recognized de jure by the United States, who is proceeding to or through the United States on an official mission or to an international organization shall be classified as a nonimmigrant under INA 101(a)(15) (B), (C), or (G)(iii).

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 78 FR 33700, June 5, 2013; 81 FR 88103, Dec. 7, 2016]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.23   Accredited officials in transit.

An accredited official of a foreign government intending to proceed in immediate and continuous transit through the United States on official business for that government is entitled to the benefits of INA 212(d)(8) if that government grants similar privileges to officials of the United States, and is classifiable C-3 under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(C). Members of the immediate family, attendants, servants, or personal employees of such an official receive the same classification as the principal alien.

return arrow Back to Top

§41.24   International organization aliens.

(a) Definition of international organization. “International organization” means:

(1) Any public international organization which has been designated by the President by Executive Order as entitled to enjoy the privileges, exemptions, and immunities provided for in the International Organizations Immunities Act (59 Stat. 669, 22 U.S.C. 288); and

(2) For the purpose of special immigrant status under INA 101(a)(27)(I), INTELSAT or any successor or separated entity thereof.

(b) Aliens coming to international organizations. (1) An alien is classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(G) if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien is within one of the classes described in that section and seeks to enter or transit the United States in pursuance of official duties. If the purpose of the entry or transit is other than pursuance of official duties, the alien is not classifiable under INA section 101(a)(15)(G).

(2) An alien applying for a visa under the provisions of INA section 101(a)(15)(G) may not be refused solely on the grounds that the applicant is not a national of the country whose government the applicant represents.

(3) An alien seeking to enter the United States as a foreign government representative to an international organization, who is also proceeding to the United States on official business as a foreign government official within the meaning of INA section 101(a)(15)(A), shall be issued a visa under that section, if otherwise qualified.

(4) An alien not classifiable under INA section 101(a)(15)(A) or in NATO-1 through NATO-6 classification but entitled to classification under INA section 101(a)(15)(G) shall be classified under section 101(a)(15)(G), even if also eligible for another nonimmigrant classification. An alien classified under INA section 101(a)(15)(G) as an immediate family member of a principal alien classifiable G-1, G-2, G-3 or G-4, may continue to be so classified even if he or she obtains employment subsequent to his or her initial entry into the United States that would allow classification under INA section 101(a)(15)(A). Such alien shall not be classified in a category other than A or G, even if also eligible for another nonimmigrant classification.

(c) Officers and employees of privatized INTELSAT, their family members and domestic servants. (1) Officers and employees of privatized INTELSAT who both were employed by INTELSAT, and held status under INA 101(a)(15)(G)(iv) for at least six months prior to privatization on July 17, 2001, will continue to be so classifiable for so long as they are officers or employees of INTELSAT or a successor or separated entity thereof.

(2) Aliens who had had G-4 status as officers and employees of INTELSAT but became officers or employees of a successor or separated entity of INTELSAT after at least six months of such employment, but prior to and in anticipation of privatization and subsequent to March 17, 2000, will also continue to be classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(G)(iv) for so long as that employment continues.

(3) Family members of officers and employees described in paragraphs (c)(1) and (2) of this section who qualify as “immediate family” under §41.21(a)(3) and who are accompanying or following to join the principal are also classifiable under INA 1010(a)(15)(G)(iv) for so long as the principal is so classified.

(4) Attendants, servants, and personal employees of officers and employees described in paragraphs (c)(1) and (2) of this section are not eligible for classification under INA 101(a)(15)(G)(v), given that the officers and employees described in paragraphs (c)(1) and (2) of this section are not officers or employees of an “international organization” for purposes of INA 101(a)(15)(G).

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 67 FR 1414, Jan. 11, 2002; 67 FR 18822, Apr. 17, 2002; 78 FR 33700, June 5, 2013; 81 FR 88103, Dec. 7, 2016]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.25   NATO representatives, officials, and employees.

(a) Classification. An alien shall be classified under the symbol NATO-1, NATO-2, NATO-3, NATO-4, or NATO-5 if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien is seeking admission to the United States under the applicable provision of the Agreement on the Status of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, National Representatives and International Staff, or is a member of the immediate family of an alien classified NATO-1 through NATO-5. (See §41.12 for classes of aliens entitled to classification under each symbol.)

(b) Armed services personnel. Armed services personnel entering the United States in accordance with the provisions of the Agreement Between the Parties to the North Atlantic Treaty Regarding the Status of Their Forces or in accordance with the provisions of the Protocol on the Status of International Military Headquarters Set Up Pursuant to the North Atlantic Treaty may enter the United States under the appropriate treaty waiver of documentary requirements contained in §41.1 (d) or (e). If a visa is issued it is classifiable under the NATO-2 symbol.

(c) Dependents of armed services personnel. Dependents of armed services personnel referred to in paragraph (b) of this section shall be classified under the symbol NATO-2.

(d) Members of civilian components and dependents. Alien members of a civilian component accompanying a force entering in accordance with the provisions of the NATO Status-of-Forces Agreement, and dependents, or alien members of a civilian component attached to or employed by an Allied Headquarters under the Protocol on the Status of International Military Headquarters, and dependents shall be classified under the symbol NATO-6.

(e) Attendant, servant, or personal employee of an alien classified NATO-1 through NATO-6. An alien attendant, servant, or personal employee of an alien classified NATO-1 through NATO-6, and any member of the immediate family of such attendant, servant, or personal employee, shall be classified under the symbol NATO-7.

return arrow Back to Top

§41.26   Diplomatic visas.

(a) Definitions. (1) Diplomatic passport means a national passport bearing that title and issued by a competent authority of a foreign government.

(2) Diplomatic visa means any nonimmigrant visa, regardless of classification, which bears that title and is issued in accordance with the regulations of this section.

(3) Equivalent of a diplomatic passport means a national passport, issued by a competent authority of a foreign government which does not issue diplomatic passports to its career diplomatic and consular officers, indicating the career diplomatic or consular status of the bearer.

(b) Place of application. With the exception of certain aliens in the United States issued nonimmigrant visas by the Department under the provisions of §41.111(b), application for a diplomatic visa shall be made at a diplomatic mission or at a consular office authorized to issue diplomatic visas, regardless of the nationality or residence of the applicant.

(c) Classes of aliens eligible to receive diplomatic visas. (1) A nonimmigrant alien who is in possession of a diplomatic passport or its equivalent shall, if otherwise qualified, be eligible to receive a diplomatic visa irrespective of the classification of the visa under §41.12 if within one of the following categories:

(i) Heads of states and their alternates;

(ii) Members of a reigning royal family;

(iii) Governors-general, governors, high commissioners, and similar high administrative or executive officers of a territorial unit, and their alternates;

(iv) Cabinet ministers and their assistants holding executive or administrative positions not inferior to that of the head of a departmental division, and their alternates;

(v) Presiding officers of chambers of national legislative bodies;

(vi) Justices of the highest national court of a foreign country;

(vii) Ambassadors, public ministers, other officers of the diplomatic service and consular officers of career;

(viii) Military officers holding a rank not inferior to that of a brigadier general in the United States Army or Air Force and Naval officers holding a rank not inferior to that of a rear admiral in the United States Navy;

(ix) Military, naval, air and other attaché and assistant attaché assigned to a foreign diplomatic mission;

(x) Officers of foreign-government delegations to international organizations so designated by Executive Order;

(xi) Officers of foreign-government delegations to, and officers of, international bodies of an official nature, other than international organizations so designated by Executive Order;

(xii) Officers of a diplomatic mission of a temporary character proceeding to or through the United States in the performance of their official duties;

(xiii) Officers of foreign-government delegations proceeding to or from a specific international conference of an official nature;

(xiv) Members of the immediate family of a principal alien who is within one of the classes described in paragraphs (c)(1)(i) to (c)(1)(xi) inclusive, of this section;

(xv) Members of the immediate family accompanying or following to join the principal alien who is within one of the classes described in paragraphs (c)(1)(xii) and (c)(1)(xiii) of this section;

(xvi) Diplomatic couriers proceeding to or through the United States in the performance of their official duties.

(2) Aliens Classifiable G-4, who are otherwise qualified, are eligible to receive a diplomatic visa if accompanying these officers:

(i) The Secretary General of the United Nations;

(ii) An Under Secretary General of the United Nations;

(iii) An Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations;

(iv) The Administrator or the Deputy Administrator of the United Nations Development Program;

(v) An Assistant Administrator of the United Nations Development Program;

(vi) The Executive Director of the:

(A) United Nation's Children's Fund;

(B) United Nations Institute for Training and Research;

(C) United Nations Industrial Development Organization;

(vii) The Executive Secretary of the:

(A) United Nations Economic Commission for Africa;

(B) United Nations Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East;

(C) United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America;

(D) United Nations Economic Commission for Europe;

(viii) The Secretary General of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development;

(ix) The Director General of the Latin American Institute for Economic and Social Planning;

(x) The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees;

(xi) The United Nations Commissioner for Technical Cooperation;

(xii) The Commissioner General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East;

(xiii) The spouse or child of any nonimmigrant alien listed in paragraphs (c)(2)(i) through (c)(2)(xii) of this section.

(3) Other individual aliens or classes of aliens are eligible to receive diplomatic visas upon authorization of the Department, the Chief of a U.S. Diplomatic Mission, the Deputy Chief of Mission, the Counselor for Consular Affairs or the principal officer of a consular post not under the jurisdiction of a diplomatic mission.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987; 53 FR 9111, Mar. 21, 1988]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.27   Official visas.

(a) Definition. Official visa means any nonimmigrant visa, regardless of classification, which bears that title and is issued in accordance with these regulations.

(b) Place of application. Official visas are ordinarily issued only when application is made in the consular district of the applicant's residence. When directed by the Department, or in the discretion of the consular officer, official visas may be issued when application is made in a consular district in which the alien is physically present but does not reside. Certain aliens in the United States may be issued official visas by the Department under the provisions of §41.111(b).

(c) Classes of aliens eligible to receive official visas. (1) A nonimmigrant within one of the following categories who is not eligible to receive a diplomatic visa shall, if otherwise qualified, be eligible to receive an official visa irrespective of classification of the visa under §41.12:

(i) Aliens within a class described in §41.26(c)(2) who are ineligible to receive a diplomatic visa because they are not in possession of a diplomatic passport or its equivalent;

(ii) Aliens classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(A);

(iii) Aliens, other than those described in §41.26(c)(3) who are classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(G), except those classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(G)(iii) unless the government of which the alien is an accredited representative is recognized de jure by the United States;

(iv) Aliens classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(C) as nonimmigrants described in INA 212(d)(8);

(v) Members and members-elect of national legislative bodies;

(vi) Justices of the lesser national and the highest state courts of a foreign country;

(vii) Officers and employees of national legislative bodies proceeding to or through the United States in the performance of their official duties;

(viii) Clerical and custodial employees attached to foreign-government delegations to, and employees of, international bodies of an official nature, other than international organizations so designated by Executive Order, proceeding to or through the United States in the performance of their official duties;

(ix) Clerical and custodial employees attached to a diplomatic mission of a temporary character proceeding to or through the United States in the performance of their official duties;

(x) Clerical and custodial employees attached to foreign-government delegations proceeding to or from a specific international conference of an official nature;

(xi) Officers and employees of foreign governments recognized de jure by the United States who are stationed in foreign contiguous territories or adjacent islands;

(xii) Members of the immediate family, attendants, servants and personal employees of, when accompanying or following to join, a principal alien who is within one of the classes referred to or described in paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (c)(1)(xi) inclusive of this section;

(xiii) Attendants, servants and personal employees accompanying or following to join a principal alien who is within one of the classes referred to or described in paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (c)(1)(xiii) inclusive of §41.26(c)(2).

(2) Other individual aliens or classes of aliens are eligible to receive official visas upon the authorization of the Department, the Chief of a U.S. Diplomatic Mission, the Deputy Chief of Mission, the Counselor for Consular Affairs, or the principal officer of a consular post not under the jurisdiction of a diplomatic mission.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987; 53 FR 9111, Mar. 21, 1988]

return arrow Back to Top

Subpart D—Temporary Visitors

§41.31   Temporary visitors for business or pleasure.

(a) Classification. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant visitor for business (B-1) or pleasure (B-2) if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(B), and that:

(1) The alien intends to leave the United States at the end of the temporary stay (consular officers are authorized, if departure of the alien as required by law does not seem fully assured, to require the posting of a bond with the Secretary of Homeland Security in a sufficient sum to ensure that at the end of the temporary visit, or upon failure to maintain temporary visitor status, or any status subsequently acquired under INA 248, the alien will depart from the United States);

(2) The alien has permission to enter a foreign country at the end of the temporary stay; and

(3) Adequate financial arrangements have been made to enable the alien to carry out the purpose of the visit to and departure from the United States.

(b) Definitions. (1) The term “business,” as used in INA 101(a)(15)(B), refers to conventions, conferences, consultations and other legitimate activities of a commercial or professional nature. It does not include local employment or labor for hire. For the purposes of this section building or construction work, whether on-site or in plant, shall be deemed to constitute purely local employment or labor for hire; provided that the supervision or training of others engaged in building or construction work (but not the actual performance of any such building or construction work) shall not be deemed to constitute purely local employment or labor for hire if the alien is otherwise qualified as a B-1 nonimmigrant. An alien seeking to enter as a nonimmigrant for employment or labor pursuant to a contract or other prearrangement is required to qualify under the provisions of §41.53. An alien of distinguished merit and ability seeking to enter the United States temporarily with the idea of performing temporary services of an exceptional nature requiring such merit and ability, but having no contract or other prearranged employment, may be classified as a nonimmigrant temporary visitor for business.

(2) The term pleasure, as used in INA 101(a)(15)(B), refers to legitimate activities of a recreational character, including tourism, amusement, visits with friends or relatives, rest, medical treatment, and activities of a fraternal, social, or service nature.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987; 53 FR 9172, Mar. 21, 1988]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.32   Nonresident alien Mexican border crossing identification cards; combined border crossing identification cards and B-1/B-2 visitor visas.

(a) Combined B-1/B-2 visitor visa and border crossing identification card (B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC)—(1) Authorization for issuance. Consular officers assigned to a consular office in Mexico designated by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Visa Services for such purpose may issue a border crossing identification card, as that term is defined in INA 101(a)(6), in combination with a B-1/B-2 nonimmigrant visitor visa (B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC), to a nonimmigrant alien who:

(i) Is a citizen and resident of Mexico;

(ii) Seeks to enter the United States as a temporary visitor for business or pleasure as defined in INA 101(a)(15)(B) for periods of stay not exceeding six months;

(iii) Is otherwise eligible for a B-1 or a B-2 temporary visitor visa.

(2) Procedure for application. Mexican applicants shall apply for a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC at any U.S. consular office in Mexico designated by the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Visa Services pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section to accept such applications. The application shall be submitted electronically on Form DS-160 or, as directed by a consular officer, on Form DS-156. If submitted electronically, it must be signed electronically by clicking the box designated “Sign Application” in the certification section of the application.

(3) Personal appearance. Each applicant shall appear in person before a consular officer to be interviewed regarding eligibility for a visitor visa, unless the consular officer waives personal appearance.

(4) Issuance and format. A B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued on or after April 1, 1998, shall consist of a card, Form DSP-150, containing a machine-readable biometric identifier. It shall contain the following data:

(i) Post symbol;

(ii) Number of the card;

(iii) Date of issuance;

(iv) Indicia “B-1/B-2 Visa and Border Crossing Card”;

(v) Name, date of birth, and sex of the person to whom issued; and

(vi) Date of expiration.

(b) Validity. A BCC previously issued by a consular officer in Mexico on Form I-186, Nonresident Alien Mexican Border Crossing Card, or Form I-586, Nonresident Alien Border Crossing Card, is valid until the expiration date on the card (if any) unless previously revoked, but not later than the date, currently October 1, 2001, on which a machine-readable, biometric identifier in the card is required in order for the card to be usable for entry. The BCC portion of a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued to a Mexican national pursuant to provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998 is valid until the date of expiration, unless previously revoked, but not later than the date, currently October 1, 2001, on which a machine-readable, biometric identifier in the card is required in order for the card to be usable for entry.

(c) Revocation. A consular or immigration officer may revoke a BCC issued on Form I-186 or Form I-586, or a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC under the provisions of §41.122, or if the consular or immigration officer determines that the alien to whom any such document was issued has ceased to be a resident and/or a citizen of Mexico. Upon revocation, the consular or immigration officer shall notify the issuing consular or immigration office. If the revoked document is a card, the consular or immigration officer shall take possession of the card and physically cancel it under standard security conditions. If the revoked document is a stamp in a passport the consular or immigration officer shall write or stamp “canceled” on the face of the document.

(d) Voidance. (1) The voiding pursuant to INA 222(g) of the visa portion of a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued at any time by a consular officer in Mexico under provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, also voids the BCC portion of that document.

(2) A BCC issued at any time by a consular officer in Mexico under any provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, is void if a consular or immigration officer determines that the alien has violated the conditions of the alien's admission into the United States, including the period of stay authorized by the Secretary of Homeland Security.

(3) A consular or immigration officer shall immediately take possession of a card determined to be void under paragraphs (d) (1) or (2) of this section and physically cancel it under standard security conditions. If the document voided in paragraphs (d) (1) or (2) is in the form of a stamp in a passport the officer shall write or stamp “canceled” across the face of the document.

(e) Replacement. When a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued under the provisions of this section, or a BCC or B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued under any provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, has been lost, mutilated, destroyed, or expired, the person to whom such card was issued may apply for a new B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC as provided in this section.

[64 FR 45163, Aug. 19, 1999, as amended at 71 FR 30591, May 30, 2006; 71 FR 34521, June 15, 2006; 73 FR 23068, Apr. 29, 2008]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.33   Nonresident alien Canadian border crossing identification card (BCC).

(a) Validity of Canadian BCC. A Canadian BCC or the BCC portion of a Canadian B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued to a permanent resident of Canada pursuant to provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, is valid until the date of expiration, if any, unless previously revoked, but not later than the date, currently October 1, 2001, on which a machine readable biometric identifier is required in order for a BCC to be usable for entry.

(b) Revocation of Canadian BCC. A consular or immigration officer may revoke a BCC or a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued in Canada at any time under the provisions of §41.122, or if the consular or immigration officer determines that the alien to whom any such document was issued has ceased to be a permanent resident of Canada. Upon revocation, the consular or immigration officer shall notify the issuing consular office and if the revoked document is a card, the consular or immigration officer shall take possession of the card and physically cancel it under standard security conditions. If the revoked document is a stamp in a passport the consular or immigration officer shall write or stamp “canceled” on the face of the document.

(c) Voidance. (1) The voiding pursuant to INA 222(g) of the visa portion of a B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued at any time by a consular officer in Canada under provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, also voids the BCC portion of that document.

(2) A BCC issued at any time by a consular officer in Canada under any provisions of this section contained in the 22 CFR, parts 1 to 299, edition revised as of April 1, 1998, is void if a consular or immigration officer finds that the alien has violated the conditions of the alien's admission into the United States, including the period of stay authorized by the Secretary of Homeland Security.

(3) A consular or immigration officer shall immediately take possession of a card determined to be void under paragraphs (c) (1) or (2) of this section and physically cancel it under standard security conditions. If the document voided under paragraphs (c) (1) or (2) is in the form of a stamp in a passport the officer shall write or stamp “canceled” across the face of the document.

[64 FR 45164, Aug. 19, 1999]

return arrow Back to Top

Subpart E—Crewman and Crew-List Visas

§41.41   Crewmen.

(a) Alien classifiable as crewman. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant crewman upon establishing to the satisfaction of the consular officer the qualifications prescribed by INA 101(a)(15)(D), provided that the alien has permission to enter some foreign country after a temporary landing in the United States, unless the alien is barred from such classification under the provisions of INA 214(f).

(b) Alien not classifiable as crewman. An alien employed on board a vessel or aircraft in a capacity not required for normal operation and service, or an alien employed or listed as a regular member of the crew in excess of the number normally required, shall not be classified as a crewman.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 66 FR 10364, Feb. 15, 2001]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.42   [Reserved]

Subpart F—Business and Media Visas

§41.51   Treaty trader, treaty investor, or treaty alien in a specialty occupation.

(a) Treaty trader—(1) Classification. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant treaty trader (E-1) if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E)(i) and that the alien:

(i) Will be in the United States solely to carry on trade of a substantial nature, which is international in scope, either on the alien's behalf or as an employee of a foreign person or organization engaged in trade, principally between the United States and the foreign state of which the alien is a national, (consideration being given to any conditions in the country of which the alien is a national which may affect the alien's ability to carry on such substantial trade); and

(ii) Intends to depart from the United States upon the termination of E-1 status.

(2) Employee of treaty trader. An alien employee of a treaty trader may be classified E-1 if the employee is in or is coming to the United States to engage in duties of an executive or supervisory character, or, if employed in a lesser capacity, the employee has special qualifications that make the services to be rendered essential to the efficient operation of the enterprise. The employer must be:

(i) A person having the nationality of the treaty country, who is maintaining the status of treaty trader if in the United States or, if not in the United States, would be classifiable as a treaty trader; or

(ii) An organization at least 50% owned by persons having the nationality of the treaty country who are maintaining nonimmigrant treaty trader status if residing in the United States or, if not residing in the United States, who would be classifiable as treaty traders.

(3) Spouse and children of treaty trader. The spouse and children of a treaty trader accompanying or following to join the principal alien are entitled to the same classification as the principal alien. The nationality of a spouse or child of a treaty trader is not material to the classification of the spouse or child under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E).

(4) Representative of foreign information media. Representatives of foreign information media shall first be considered for possible classification as nonimmigrants under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(I), before consideration is given to their possible classification as treaty traders under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E) and of this section.

(5) Treaty country. A treaty country is for purposes of this section a foreign state with which a qualifying Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and Navigation or its equivalent exists with the United States. A treaty country includes a foreign state that is accorded treaty visa privileges under INA 101(a)(15)(E) by specific legislation (other than the INA).

(6) Nationality of the treaty country. The authorities of the foreign state of which the alien claims nationality determine the nationality of an individual treaty trader. In the case of an organization, ownership must be traced as best as is practicable to the individuals who ultimately own the organization.

(7) Trade. The term “trade” as used in this section means the existing international exchange of items of trade for consideration between the United States and the treaty country. Existing trade includes successfully negotiated contracts binding upon the parties that call for the immediate exchange of items of trade. This exchange must be traceable and identifiable. Title to the trade item must pass from one treaty party to the other.

(8) Item of trade. Items that qualify for trade within these provisions include but are not limited to goods, services, technology, monies, international banking, insurance, transportation, tourism, communications, and some news gathering activities.

(9) Substantial trade. Substantial trade for the purposes of this section entails the quantum of trade sufficient to ensure a continuous flow of trade items between the United States and the treaty country. This continuous flow contemplates numerous exchanges over time rather than a single transaction, regardless of the monetary value. Although the monetary value of the trade item being exchanged is a relevant consideration, greater weight is given to more numerous exchanges of larger value. In the case of smaller businesses, an income derived from the value of numerous transactions that is sufficient to support the treaty trader and his or her family constitutes a favorable factor in assessing the existence of substantial trade.

(10) Principal trade. Trade shall be considered to be principal trade between the United States and the treaty country when over 50% of the volume of international trade of the treaty trader is conducted between the United States and the treaty country of the treaty trader's nationality.

(11) Executive or supervisory character. The executive or supervisory element of the employee's position must be a principal and primary function of the position and not an incidental or collateral function. Executive and/or supervisory duties grant the employee ultimate control and responsibility for the enterprise's overall operation or a major component thereof.

(i) An executive position provides the employee great authority to determine policy of and direction for the enterprise.

(ii) A position primarily of supervisory character grants the employee supervisory responsibility for a significant proportion of an enterprise's operations and does not generally involve the direct supervision of low-level employees.

(12) Special qualifications. Special qualifications are those skills and/or aptitudes that an employee in a lesser capacity brings to a position or role that are essential to the successful or efficient operation of the enterprise.

(i) The essential nature of the alien's skills to the employing firm is determined by assessing the degree of proven expertise of the alien in the area of operations involved, the uniqueness of the specific skill or aptitude, the length of experience and/or training with the firm, the period of training or other experience necessary to perform effectively the projected duties, and the salary the special qualifications can command. The question of special skills and qualifications must be determined by assessing the circumstances on a case-by-case basis.

(ii) Whether the special qualifications are essential will be assessed in light of all circumstances at the time of each visa application on a case-by-case basis. A skill that is unique at one point may become commonplace at a later date. Skills required to start up an enterprise may no longer be essential after initial operations are complete and are running smoothly. Some skills are essential only in the short-term for the training of locally hired employees. Long-term essentiality might, however, be established in connection with continuous activities in such areas as product improvement, quality control, or the provision of a service not generally available in the United States.

(13) Labor disputes. Citizens of Canada or Mexico shall not be entitled to classification under this section if the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of Labor have certified that:

(i) There is in progress a strike or lockout in the course of a labor dispute in the occupational classification at the place or intended place of employment; and

(ii) The alien has failed to establish that the alien's entry will not affect adversely the settlement of the strike or lockout or the employment of any person who is involved in the strike or lockout.

(b) Treaty investor—(1) Classification. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant treaty investor (E'2) if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E)(ii) and that the alien:

(i) Has invested or is actively in the process of investing a substantial amount of capital in bona fide enterprise in the United States, as distinct from a relatively small amount of capital in a marginal enterprise solely for the purpose of earning a living; and

(ii) Is seeking entry solely to develop and direct the enterprise; and

(iii) Intends to depart from the United States upon the termination of E'2 status.

(2) Employee of treaty investor. An alien employee of a treaty investor may be classified E-2 if the employee is in or is coming to the United States to engage in duties of an executive or supervisory character, or, if employed in a lesser capacity, the employee has special qualifications that make the services to be rendered essential to the efficient operation of the enterprise. The employer must be:

(i) A person having the nationality of the treaty country, who is maintaining the status of treaty investor if in the United States or, if not in the United States, who would be classifiable as a treaty investor; or

(ii) An organization at least 50% owned by persons having the nationality of the treaty country who are maintaining nonimmigrant treaty investor status if residing in the United States or, if not residing in the United States, who would be classifiable as treaty investors.

(3) Spouse and children of treaty investor. The spouse and children of a treaty investor accompanying or following to join the principal alien are entitled to the same classification as the principal alien. The nationality of a spouse or child of a treaty investor is not material to the classification of the spouse or child under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E).

(4) Representative of foreign information media. Representatives of foreign information media shall first be considered for possible classification as nonimmigrants under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(I), before consideration is given to their possible classification as nonimmigrants under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E) and of this section.

(5) Treaty country. A treaty country is for purposes of this section a foreign state with which a qualifying Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and Navigation or its equivalent exists with the United States. A treaty country includes a foreign state that is accorded treaty visa privileges under INA 101(a)(15)(E) by specific legislation (other than the INA).

(6) Nationality of the treaty country. The authorities of the foreign state of which the alien claims nationality determine the nationality of an individual treaty investor. In the case of an organization, ownership must be traced as best as is practicable to the individuals who ultimately own the organization.

(7) Investment. Investment means the treaty investor's placing of capital, including funds and other assets, at risk in the commercial sense with the objective of generating a profit. The treaty investor must be in possession of and have control over the capital invested or being invested. The capital must be subject to partial or total loss if investment fortunes reverse. Such investment capital must be the investor's unsecured personal business capital or capital secured by personal assets. Capital in the process of being invested or that has been invested must be irrevocably committed to the enterprise. The alien has the burden of establishing such irrevocable commitment given to the particular circumstances of each case. The alien may use any legal mechanism available, such as by placing invested funds in escrow pending visa issuance, that would not only irrevocably commit funds to the enterprise but that might also extend some personal liability protection to the treaty investor.

(8) Bona fide enterprise. The enterprise must be a real and active commercial or entrepreneurial undertaking, producing some service or commodity for profit and must meet applicable legal requirements for doing business in the particular jurisdiction in the United States.

(9) Substantial amount of capital. A substantial amount of capital constitutes that amount that is:

(i)(A) Substantial in the proportional sense, i.e., in relationship to the total cost of either purchasing an established enterprise or creating the type of enterprise under consideration;

(B) Sufficient to ensure the treaty investor's financial commitment to the successful operation of the enterprise; and

(C) Of a magnitude to support the likelihood that the treaty investor will successfully develop and direct the enterprise.

(ii) Whether an amount of capital is substantial in the proportionality sense is understood in terms of an inverted sliding scale; i.e., the lower the total cost of the enterprise, the higher, proportionately, the investment must be to meet these criteria.

(10) Marginal enterprise. A marginal enterprise is an enterprise that does not have the present or future capacity to generate more than enough income to provide a minimal living for the treaty investor and his or her family. An enterprise that does not have the capacity to generate such income but that has a present or future capacity to make a significant economic contribution is not a marginal enterprise. The projected future capacity should generally be realizable within five years from the date the alien commences normal business activity of the enterprise.

(11) Solely to develop and direct. The business or individual treaty investor does or will develop and direct the enterprise by controlling the enterprise through ownership of at least 50% of the business, by possessing operational control through a managerial position or other corporate device, or by other means.

(12) Executive or supervisory character. The executive or supervisory element of the employee's position must be a principal and primary function of the position and not an incidental or collateral function. Executive and/or supervisory duties grant the employee ultimate control and responsibility for the enterprise's overall operation or a major component thereof.

(i) An executive position provides the employee great authority to determine policy of and direction for the enterprise.

(ii) A position primarily of supervisory character grants the employee supervisory responsibility for a significant proportion of an enterprise's operations and does not generally involve the direct supervision of low-level employees.

(13) Special qualifications. Special qualifications are those skills and/or aptitudes that an employee in a lesser capacity brings to a position or role that are essential to the successful or efficient operation of the enterprise.

(i) The essential nature of the alien's skills to the employing firm is determined by assessing the degree of proven expertise of the alien in the area of operations involved, the uniqueness of the specific skill or aptitude, the length of experience and/or training with the firm, the period of training or other experience necessary to perform effectively the projected duties, and the salary the special qualifications can command. The question of special skills and qualifications must be determined by assessing the circumstances on a case-by-case basis.

(ii) Whether the special qualifications are essential will be assessed in light of all circumstances at the time of each visa application on a case-by-case basis. A skill that is unique at one point may become commonplace at a later date. Skills required to start up an enterprise may no longer be essential after initial operations are complete and are running smoothly. Some skills are essential only in the short-term for the training of locally hired employees. Long-term essentiality might, however, be established in connection with continuous activities in such areas as product improvement, quality control, or the provision of a service not generally available in the United States.

(14) Labor disputes. Citizens of Canada or Mexico shall not be entitled to classification under this section if the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of Labor have certified that:

(i) There is in progress a strike or lockout in the course of a labor dispute in the occupational classification at the place or intended place of employment; and

(ii) The alien has failed to establish that the alien's entry will not affect adversely the settlement of the strike or lockout or the employment of any person who is involved in the strike or lockout.

(c) Nonimmigrant E-3 treaty aliens in specialty occupations—(1) Classification. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant treaty alien in a specialty occupation if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E)(iii) and that the alien:

(i) Possesses the nationality of the country statutorily designated for treaty aliens in specialty occupation status;

(ii) Satisfies the requirements of INA 214(i)(1) and the corresponding regulations defining specialty occupation promulgated by the Department of Homeland Security;

(iii) Presents to a consular officer a copy of the Labor Condition Application signed by the employer and approved by the Department of Labor, and meeting the attestation requirements of INA Section 212(t)(1);

(iv) Presents to a consular officer evidence of the alien's academic or other qualifying credentials as required under INA 214(i)(1), and a job offer letter or other documentation from the employer establishing that upon entry into the United States the applicant will be engaged in qualifying work in a specialty occupation, as defined in paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this section, and that the alien will be paid the actual or prevailing wage referred to in INA 212(t)(1);

(v) Has a visa number allocated under INA 214(g)(11)(B); and,

(vi) Intends to depart upon the termination of E-3 status.

(2) Spouse and children of treaty alien in a specialty occupation. The spouse and children of a treaty alien in a specialty occupation accompanying or following to join the principal alien are, if otherwise admissible, entitled to the same classification as the principal alien. A spouse or child of a principal E-3 treaty alien need not have the same nationality as the principal in order to be classifiable under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E). Spouses and children of E-3 principals are not subject to the numerical limitations of INA 214(g)(11)(B).

[70 FR 52293, Sept. 2, 2005]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.52   Information media representative.

(a) Representative of foreign press, radio, film, or other information media. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant information media representative if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(I) and is a representative of a foreign press, radio, film, or other information medium having its home office in a foreign country, the government of which grants reciprocity for similar privileges to representatives of such a medium having home offices in the United States.

(b) Classification when applicant eligible for both I visa and E visa. An alien who will be engaged in foreign information media activities in the United States and meets the criteria set forth in paragraph (a) of this section shall be classified as a nonimmigrant under INA 101(a)(15)(I) even if the alien may also be classifiable as a nonimmigrant under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(E).

(c) Spouse and children of information media representative. The spouse or child of an information media representative is classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(I) if accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

return arrow Back to Top

§41.53   Temporary workers and trainees.

(a) Requirements for H classification. An alien shall be classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(H) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under that section; and either

(2) With respect to the principal alien, the consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by DHS, or by the Department of Labor in the case of temporary agricultural workers, of a petition to accord such classification or of the extension by DHS of the period of authorized entry in such classification; or

(3) The consular officer is satisfied the alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Petition approval. The approval of a petition by the Department of Homeland Security or by the Department of Labor does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(c) Validity of visa. The period of validity of a visa issued on the basis of paragraph (a) to this section must not exceed the period indicated in the petition, notification, or confirmation required in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(d) Alien not entitled to H classification. The consular officer must suspend action on this alien's application and submit a report to the approving DHS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien applying for a visa under INA 101(a)(15)(H) is not entitled to the classification as approved.

(e) “Trainee” defined. The term Trainee, as used in INA 101(a)(15)(H)(iii), means a nonimmigrant alien who seeks to enter the United States temporarily at the invitation of an individual, organization, firm, or other trainer for the purpose of receiving instruction in any field of endeavor (other than graduate medical education or training), including agriculture, commerce, communication, finance, government, transportation, and the professions.

(f) Former exchange visitor. Former exchange visitors who are subject to the 2-year residence requirement of INA 212(e) are ineligible to apply for visas under INA 101(a)(15)(H) until they have fulfilled the residence requirement or obtained a waiver of the requirement.

[57 FR 31449, July 16, 1992, as amended at 61 FR 1833, Jan. 24, 1996; 65 FR 52306, Aug. 29, 2000]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.54   Intracompany transferees (executives, managers, and specialized knowledge employees).

(a) Requirements for L classification. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA section 101(a)(15)(L) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under that section; and either

(2) In the case of an individual petition, the consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by DHS of a petition to accord such classification or of the extension by DHS of the period of authorized stay in such classification; or

(3) In the case of a blanket petition,

(i) The alien has presented to the consular officer official evidence of the approval by DHS of a blanket petition listing only those intracompany relationships and positions found to qualify under INA section 101(a)(15)(L);

(ii) The alien is otherwise eligible for L-1 classification pursuant to the blanket petition; and,

(iii) The alien requests that he or she be accorded such classification for the purpose of being transferred to, or remaining in, qualifying positions identified in such blanket petition; or

(4) The consular officer is satisfied the alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Petition approval. The approval of a petition by DHS does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(c) Alien not entitled to L-1 classification under individual petition. The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and submit a report to the approving DHS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien applying for a visa as the beneficiary of an approved individual petition under INA section 101(a)(15)(L) is not entitled to such classification as approved.

(d) Labor disputes. Citizens of Canada or Mexico shall not be entitled to classification under this section if the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of Labor have certified that:

(1) There is in progress a strike or lockout in the course of a labor dispute in the occupational classification at the place or intended place of employment; and,

(2) The alien has failed to establish that the alien's entry will not affect adversely the settlement of the strike or lockout or the employment of any person who is involved in the strike or lockout.

(e) Alien not entitled to L-1 classification under blanket petition. The consular officer shall deny L classification based on a blanket petition if the documentation presented by the alien claiming to be a beneficiary thereof does not establish to the satisfaction of the consular officer that

(1) The alien has been continuously employed by the same employer, an affiliate or a subsidiary thereof, for one year within the three years immediately preceding the application for the L visa;

(2) The alien was rendering services in a capacity that is managerial, executive, or involves specialized knowledge throughout that year; or

(3) The alien is destined to render services in such a capacity, as identified in the petition and in an organization listed in the petition.

(f) Former exchange visitor. Former exchange visitors who are subject to the two-year foreign residence requirement of INA section 212(e) are ineligible to apply for visas under INA section 101(a)(15)(L) until they have fulfilled the residence requirement or obtained a waiver of the requirement.

[77 FR 8120, Feb. 14, 2012]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.55   Aliens with extraordinary ability.

(a) Requirements for O classification. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(O) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section; and either

(2) With respect to the principal alien, the consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by DHS of a petition to accord such classification or of the extension by DHS of the period of authorized stay in such classification; or

(3) The consular officer is satisfied the alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Approval of visa. The approval of a petition by DHS does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(c) Validity of visa. The period of validity of a visa issued on the basis of paragraph (a) to this section must not exceed the period indicated in the petition, notification, or confirmation required in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(d) Alien not entitled to O classification. The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and submit a report to the approving DHS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien applying for a visa under INA 101(a)(15)(O) is not entitled to the classification as approved.

[57 FR 31450, July 16, 1992, as amended at 61 FR 1833, Jan. 24, 1996]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.56   Athletes, artists and entertainers.

(a) Requirements for P classification. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(P) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section; and either

(2) With respect to the principal alien, the consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by DHS of a petition to accord such classification or of the extension by DHS of the period of authorized stay in such classification; or

(3) The consular officer is satisfied the alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Approval of visa. The approval of a petition by DHS does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(c) Validity of visa. The period of validity of a visa issued on the basis of paragraph (a) to this section must not exceed the period indicated in the petition, confirmation, or extension of stay required in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(d) Alien not entitled to P classification. The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and submit a report to the approving DHS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien applying for a visa under INA 101(a)(15)(P) is not entitled to the classification as approved.

[57 FR 31450, July 16, 1992, as amended at 61 FR 1833, Jan. 24, 1996]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.57   International cultural exchange visitors and visitors under the Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act (IPPCTPA).

(a) International cultural exchange visitors—(1) Requirements for classification under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(i). A consular officer may classify an alien under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(Q)(i) if:

(i) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section, and

(ii) The consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by DHS of a petition or the extension by DHS of the period of authorized stay in such classification.

(2) Approval of petition. DHS approval of a petition does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(3) Validity of visa. The period of validity of a visa issued on the basis of this paragraph (a) must not exceed the period indicated in the petition, notification, or confirmation required in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(4) Alien not entitled to Q classification. The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and submit a report to the approving DHS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien does not qualify under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(i).

(b) Trainees under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(ii)—(1) Requirements for classification under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(ii). A consular officer may classify an alien under the provisions of INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(ii) if:

(i) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section;

(ii) The consular officer has received a certification letter prepared by a program administration charged by the Department of State in consultation with the Department of Justice with the operation of the Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program (IPPCTP) which establishes at a minimum:

(A) The name of the alien's employer in the United States, and, if applicable, in Ireland or Northern Ireland;

(B) If the alien is participating in the IPPCTP as an unemployed alien, that the employment in the United States is in an occupation designated by the employment and training administration of the alien's place of residence as being most beneficial to the local economy;

(C) That the program administrator has accepted the alien into the program;

(D) That the alien has been physically resident in Northern Ireland or in the counties of Louth, Monaghan, Cavan, Leitrim, Sligo, and Donegal in the Republic of Ireland and the length of time immediately prior to the issuance of the letter that the alien has claimed such place as his or her residence;

(E) The alien's date and place of birth;

(F) If the alien is participating in the IPPCTP as an already employed participant, the length of time immediately prior to the issuance of the letter that the alien has been employed by an employer in the alien's place of physical residence;

(iii) If applicable, the consular officer is satisfied the alien is the spouse or child of an alien classified under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(ii), and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(2) Aliens not entitled to such classification. The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and notify the alien and the designated program administrator described in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this section if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien does not qualify under INA section 101(a)(15)(Q)(ii).

[65 FR 14770, Mar. 17, 2000, as amended at 66 FR 52502, Oct. 16, 2001]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.58   Aliens in religious occupations.

(a) Requirements for “R” classification. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(R) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section; and

(2) With respect to the principal alien, the consular officer has received official evidence of the approval by USCIS of a petition to accord such classification or the extension by USCIS of the period of authorized stay in such classification; or

(3) The alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Petition approval. The approval of a petition by USCIS does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(c) Validity of visa. The period of validity of a visa issued on the basis of paragraph (a) to this section must not precede or exceed the period indicated in the petition, notification, or confirmation required in paragraph (a)(2) of this section.

(d) Aliens not entitled to classification under INA 101(a)(15)(R). The consular officer must suspend action on the alien's application and submit a report to the approving USCIS office if the consular officer knows or has reason to believe that an alien applying for a visa under INA 101(a)(15)(R) is not entitled to the classification as approved.

[74 FR 51237, Oct. 6, 2009]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.59   Professionals under the North American Free Trade Agreement.

(a) Requirements for classification as a NAFTA professional. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA 214(e) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section; and

(2) The alien shall have presented to the consular officer sufficient evidence of an offer of employment in the United States requiring employment of a person in a professional capacity consistent with NAFTA Chapter 16 Annex 1603 Appendix 1603.D.1 and sufficient evidence that the alien possesses the credentials of that profession as listed in said appendix; or

(3) The alien is the spouse or child of an alien so classified in accordance with paragraph (a)(2) of this section and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien.

(b) Visa validity. The period of validity of a visa issued pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section may not exceed the period established on a reciprocal basis.

(c) Temporary entry. Temporary entry means an entry into the United States without the intent to establish permanent residence. The alien must satisfy the consular officer that the proposed stay is temporary. A temporary period has a reasonable, finite end that does not equate to permanent residence. The circumstances surrounding an application should reasonably and convincingly indicate that the alien's temporary work assignment in the United States will end predictably and that the alien will depart upon completion of the assignment.

(d) Labor disputes. Citizens of Canada or Mexico shall not be entitled to classification under this section if the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of Labor have certified that:

(1) There is in progress a strike or lockout in the course of a labor dispute in the occupational classification at the place or intended place of employment; and

(2) The alien has failed to establish that the alien's entry will not affect adversely the settlement of the strike or lockout or the employment of any person who is involved in the strike or lockout.

[58 FR 68527, Dec. 28, 1993, as amended at 63 FR 10305, Mar. 3, 1998; 79 FR 7583, Feb. 10, 2014]

return arrow Back to Top

Subpart G—Students and Exchange Visitors

§41.61   Students—academic and nonacademic.

(a) Definitions—(1) Academic, in INA 101(a)(15)(F), refers to an established college, university, seminary, conservatory, academic high school, elementary school, or other academic institution, or a language training program.

(2) Nonacademic, in INA 101(a)(15)(M), refers to an established vocational or other recognized nonacademic institution (other than a language training program).

(b) Classification. (1) An alien is classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(F) (i) or (iii) or INA 101(a)(15)(M) (i) or (iii) if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under one of those sections, and:

(i) The alien has been accepted for attendance for the purpose of pursuing a full course of study, or, for students classified under INA 101(a)(15) (F)(iii) and (M)(iii) Border Commuter Students, full or part-time course of study, in an academic institution approved by the Secretary of Homeland Security for foreign students under INA 101(a)(15)(F)(i) or a nonacademic institution approved under 101(a)(15)(M)(i). The alien has presented a SEVIS Form I-20, Form I-20A-B/I-20ID. Certificate of Eligibility For Nonimmigrant Student Status—For Academic and Language Students, or Form I-20M-N/I-20ID, Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status—For Vocational Students, properly completed and signed by the alien and a designated official as prescribed in regulations found at 8 CFR 214.2(F) and 214.2(M);

(ii) The alien possesses sufficient funds to cover expenses while in the United States or can satisfy the consular officer that other arrangements have been made to meet those expenses;

(iii) The alien, unless coming to participate exclusively in an English language training program, has sufficient knowledge of the English language to undertake the chosen course of study or training. If the alien's knowledge of English is inadequate, the consular officer may nevertheless find the alien so classifiable if the accepting institution offers English language training, and has accepted the alien expressly for a full course of study (or part-time course of study for Border Commuter Students) in a language with which the alien is familiar, or will enroll the alien in a combination of courses and English instruction which will constitute a full course of study if required; and

(iv) The alien intends, and will be able, to depart upon termination of student status.

(2) An alien otherwise qualified for classification as a student, who intends to study the English language exclusively, may be classified as a student under INA 101(a) (15) (F) (i) even though no credits are given by the accepting institution for such study. The accepting institution, however, must offer a full course of study in the English language and must accept the alien expressly for such study.

(3) The alien spouse and minor children of an alien who has been or will be issued a visa under INA 101(a) (15) (F) (i) or 101(a) (15) (M) (i) may receive nonimmigrant visas under INA 101(a) (15) (F) (ii) or 101(a) (15) (M) (ii) if the consular officer is satisfied that they will be accompanying or following to join the principal alien; that sufficient funds are available to cover their expenses in the United States; and, that they intend to leave the United States upon the termination of the status of the principal alien.

(c) Posting of bond. In borderline cases involving an alien otherwise qualified for classification under INA 101(a) (15) (F), the consular officer is authorized to require the posting of a bond with the Secretary of Homeland Security in a sum sufficient to ensure that the alien will depart upon the conclusion of studies or in the event of failure to maintain student status.

(d) Electronic verification and notification. A student's acceptance documentation must be verified by a consular official's review of the SEVIS data in the Consolidated Consular Database or via direct access to SEVIS or ISEAS prior to the issuance of an F-1, F-2, M-1 or M-3 visa. Evidence of the payment of any applicable fees, if not presented with other documentation, may also be verified through the Consolidated Consular Database or direct access to SEVIS. Upon issuance of an F or M visa, notification of such issuance must be entered into the SEVIS database.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 67 FR 58695, Sept. 18, 2002; 68 FR 28131, May 23, 2003]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.62   Exchange visitors.

(a) J-1 classification. An alien is classifiable as an exchange visitor if qualified under the provisions of INA 101(a) (15) (J) and the consular officer is satisfied that the alien:

(1) Has been accepted to participate, and intends to participate, in an exchange visitor program designated by the Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs, Department of State, as evidenced by the presentation of a properly executed Form DS-2019, Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1) Status;

(2) Has sufficient funds to cover expenses or has made other arrangements to provide for expenses;

(3) Has sufficient knowledge of the English language to undertake the program for which selected, or, except for an alien coming to participate in a graduate medical education or training program, the sponsoring organization is aware of the language deficiency and has nevertheless indicated willingness to accept the alien; and

(4) Meets the requirements of INA 212(j) if coming to participate in a graduate medical education or training program.

(5) Electronic verification and notification. An exchange visitor's acceptance documentation and payment of any applicable fees must be verified by a consular official's review of the SEVIS database or via direct access to SEVIS or ISEAS prior to the issuance of a J-1 or J-2 visa. Evidence of the payment of any applicable fees, if not presented with other documentation, may also be verified through the Consolidated Consular Database or direct access to SEVIS. Upon issuance of a J-1 or J-2 visa, notification of such issuance must be entered into the SEVIS database.

(b) J-2 Classification. The spouse or minor child of an alien classified J-1 is classifiable J-2.

(c) Applicability of INA 212(e). (1) An alien is subject to the 2-year foreign residence requirement of INA 212(e) if:

(i) The alien's participation in one or more exchange programs was wholly or partially financed, directly or indirectly, by the U.S. Government or by the government of the alien's last legal permanent residence; or

(ii) At the time of the issuance of an exchange visitor visa and admission to the United States, or, if not required to obtain a nonimmigrant visa, at the time of admission as an exchange visitor, or at the time of acquisition of such status after admission, the alien is a national and resident or, if not a national, a legal permanent resident (or has status equivalent thereto) of a country which the Secretary of State has designated, through publication by public notice in the Federal Register, as clearly requiring the services of persons engaged in the field of specialized knowledge or skill in which the alien will engage during the exchange visitor program; or

(iii) The alien acquires exchange visitor status in order to receive graduate medical education or training in the United States.

(2) For the purposes of this paragraph the terms financed directly and financed indirectly are defined as set forth in section §514.1 of chapter V.

(3) The country in which 2 years' residence and physical presence will satisfy the requirements of INA 212(e) in the case of an alien determined to be subject to such requirements is the country of which the alien is a national and resident, or, if not a national, a legal permanent resident (or has status equivalent thereto).

(4) If an alien is subject to the 2-year foreign residence requirement of INA 212(e), the spouse or child of that alien, accompanying or following to join the alien, is also subject to that requirement if admitted to the United States pursuant to INA 101(a) (15) (J) or if status is acquired pursuant to that section after admission.

(d) Notification to alien concerning 2-year foreign residence requirement. Before the consular officer issues an exchange visitor visa, the consular officer must inform the alien whether the alien will be subject to the 2-year residence and physical presence requirement of INA 212(e) if admitted to the United States under INA 101(a) (15) (J) and, if so, the country in which 2 years' residence and physical presence will satisfy the requirement.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 67 FR 58695, Sept. 18, 2002; 68 FR 28132, May 23, 2003; 72 FR 10061, Mar. 7, 2007]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.63   Two-year home-country physical presence requirement.

(a) Statutory basis for rule. Section 212(e) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended, provides in substance as follows:

(1) No person admitted under Section 101(a) (15)(J) or acquiring such status after admission:

(i) Whose participation in the program for which he came to the United States was financed in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, by an agency of the United States Government or by the government of the country of his nationality or of his last legal permanent residence;

(ii) Who at the time of admission or acquisition of status under 101(a)(15)(J) was a national or legal permanent resident of a country which the Secretary of State, pursuant to regulations prescribed by him, had designated as clearly requiring the services of persons engaged in the field of specialized knowledge or skill in which the alien was engaged [See the most recent “Revised Exchange Visitor Skills List”, at http://exchanges.state.gov/education/jexchanges/participation/skills__list.pdf; or

(iii) Who came to the United States or acquired such status in order to receive graduate medical education or training, shall be eligible to apply for an immigrant visa, or for permanent residence, or for a nonimmigrant visa under section 101(a)(15)(H) or section 101(a)(15)(L) until is established that such person has resided and been physically present in the country of his nationality or his last legal permanent residence for an aggregate of at least two years following departure from the United States.

(2) Upon the favorable recommendation of the Secretary of State, pursuant to the request of an interested United States Government agency (or in the case of an alien who is a graduate of a foreign medical school pursuing a program in graduate medical education or training, pursuant to the request of a State Department of Public Health, or its equivalent), or of the Secretary of Homeland Security after the latter has determined that departure from the United States would impose exceptional hardship upon the alien's spouse or child (if such spouse or child is a citizen of the United States or a legal permanent resident alien), or that the alien cannot return to the country of his nationality or last legal permanent residence because he would be subject to persecution on account of race, religion, or political opinion, the Secretary of Homeland Security may waive the requirement of such two-year foreign residence abroad in the case of any alien whose admission to the United States is found by the Secretary of Homeland Security to be in the public interest except that in the case of a waiver requested by a State Department of Public Health, or its equivalent, the waiver shall be subject to the requirements of section 214(l) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1184).

(3) Except in the case of an alien who is a graduate of a foreign medical school pursuing a program in graduate medical education or training, the Secretary of Homeland Security, upon the favorable recommendation of the Secretary of State, may also waive such two-year foreign residence requirement in any case in which the foreign country of the alien's nationality or last legal permanent residence has furnished the Secretary of State a statement in writing that it has no objection to such waiver in the case of such alien. Notwithstanding the foregoing, an alien who is a graduate of a foreign medical school pursuing a program in graduate medical education or training may obtain a waiver of such two-year foreign residence requirements if said alien meets the requirements of section 214(l) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1184) and paragraphs (a) (2) and (e) of this section.

(b) Request for waiver on the basis of exceptional hardship or probable persecution on account of race, religion, or political opinion. (1) An exchange visitor who seeks a waiver of the two-year home-country residence and physical presence requirement on the grounds that such requirement would impose exceptional hardship upon the exchange visitor's spouse or child (if such spouse or child is a citizen of the United States or a legal permanent resident alien), or on the grounds that such requirement would subject the exchange visitor to persecution on account of race, religion, or political opinion, shall submit the application for waiver (DHS Form I-612) to the jurisdictional office of the Department of Homeland Security.

(2)(i) If the Secretary of Homeland Security (Secretary of DHS) determines that compliance with the two-year home-country residence and physical presence requirement would impose exceptional hardship upon the spouse or child of the exchange visitor, or would subject the exchange visitor to persecution on account of race, religion, or political opinion, the Secretary of DHS shall transmit a copy of his determination together with a summary of the details of the expected hardship or persecution, to the Waiver Review Division, in the Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs.

(ii) With respect to those cases in which the Secretary of DHS has determined that compliance with the two-year home-country residence and physical presence requirement would impose exceptional hardship upon the spouse or child of the exchange visitor, the Waiver Review Division shall review the program, policy, and foreign relations aspects of the case, make a recommendation, and forward it to the appropriate office at DHS. If it deems it appropriate, the Waiver Review Division may request the views of each of the exchange visitors' sponsors concerning the waiver application. Except as set forth in paragraph (g)(4) of this section, the recommendation of the Waiver Review Division shall constitute the recommendation of the Department of State.

(iii) With respect to those cases in which the Secretary of DHS has determined that compliance with the two-year home-country residence and physical presence requirement would subject the exchange visitor to persecution on account of race, religion, or political opinion, the Waiver Review Division shall review the program, policy, and foreign relations aspects of the case, including consultation if deemed appropriate with the Bureau of Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs of the United States Department of State, make a recommendation, and forward such recommendation to the Secretary of DHS. Except as set forth in paragraph (g)(4) of this section, the recommendation of the Waiver Review Division shall constitute the recommendation of the Department of State and such recommendation shall be forwarded to DHS.

(c) Requests for waiver made by an interested United States Government Department of State. (1) A United States Government agency may request a waiver of the two-year home-country residence and physical presence requirement on behalf of an exchange visitor if such exchange visitor is actively and substantially involved in a program or activity sponsored by or of interest to such agency.

(2) A United States Government agency requesting a waiver shall submit its request in writing and fully explain why the grant of such waiver request would be in the public interest and the detrimental effect that would result to the program or activity of interest to the requesting agency if the exchange visitor is unable to continue his or her involvement with the program or activity.

(3) A request by a United States Government agency shall be signed by the head of the agency, or his or her designee, and shall include copies of all IAP 66 or DS-2019 forms issued to the exchange visitor, his or her current address, and his or her country of nationality or last legal permanent residence.

(4) A request by a United States Government agency, excepting the Department of Veterans Affairs, on behalf of an exchange visitor who is a foreign medical graduate who entered the United States to pursue graduate medical education or training, and who is willing to provide primary care or specialty medicine in a designated primary care Health Professional shortage Area, or a Medically Underserved Area, or psychiatric care in a Mental Health Professional Shortage Area, shall, in additional to the requirement set forth in paragraphs (c)(2) and (3) of this section, include:

(i) A copy of the employment contract between the foreign medical graduate and the health care facility at which he or she will be employed. Such contract shall specify a term of employment of not less than three years and that the foreign medical graduate is to be employed by the facility for the purpose of providing not less than 40 hours per week of primary medical care, i.e., general or family practice, general internal medicine, pediatrics, or obstetrics and gynecology, in a designated primary care Health Professional Shortage Area or designated Medically Underserved Area (“MUA”) or psychiatric care in a designated Mental Health Professional Shortage Area. Further, such employment contract shall not include a non-compete clause enforceable against the foreign medical graduate.

(ii) A statement, signed and dated by the head of the health care facility at which the foreign medical graduate will be employed, that the facility is located in an area designated by the Secretary of Health and Human Services as a Medically Underserved Area or Primary Medical Care Health Professional Shortage Area or Mental Health Professional Shortage Area and provides medical care to both Medicaid or Medicare eligible patients and indigent uninsured patients. The statement shall also list the primary care Health Professional Shortage Area, Mental Health Professional Shortage Area, or Medically Underserved Area/Population identifier number of the designation (assigned by the Secretary of Health and Human Services), and shall include the FIPS county code and census tract or block numbering area number (assigned by the Bureau of the Census) or the 9-digit zipcode of the area where the facility is located.

(iii) A statement, signed and dated by the foreign medical graduate exchange visitor that shall read as follows:

I, __________ (name of exchange visitor) hereby declare and certify, under penalty of the provisions of 18 U.S.C. 1001, that I do not now have pending nor am I submitting during the pendency of this request, another request to any United States Government department or agency or any State Department of Public Health, or equivalent, other than __________ (insert name of United States Government Agency requesting waiver) to act on my behalf in any matter relating to a waiver of my two-year home-country physical presence requirement.

(iv) Evidence that unsuccessful efforts have been made to recruit an American physician for the position to be filled.

(5) Except as set forth in paragraph (g)(4) of this section, the recommendation of the Waiver Review Division shall constitute the recommendation of the Department of State and such recommendation shall be forwarded to the Secretary of DHS.

(d) Requests for waiver made on the basis of a statement from the exchange visitor's home-country that it has no objection to the waiver. (1) Applications for waiver of the two-year home-country residence and physical presence requirement may be supported by a statement of no objection by the exchange visitor's country of nationality or last legal permanent residence. The statement of no objection shall be directed to the Secretary of State through diplomatic channels; i.e., from the country's Foreign Office to the Department of State through the U.S. Mission in the foreign country concerned, or through the foreign country's head of mission or duly appointed designee in the United States to the Secretary of State in the form of a diplomatic note. This note shall include applicant's full name, date and place of birth, and present address. If deemed appropriate, the Department of State may request the views of each of the exchange visitor's sponsors concerning the waiver application.

(2) The Waiver Review Division shall review the program, policy, and foreign relations aspects of the case and forward its recommendation to the Secretary of DHS. Except as set forth in §41.63(g)(4), infra, the recommendation of the Waiver Review Division shall constitute the recommendation of the Department of State.

(3) An exchange visitor who is a graduate of a foreign medical school and who is pursuing a program in graduate medical education or training in the United States is prohibited under section 212(e) of the Immigration and Nationality Act from applying for a waiver solely on the basis of no objection from his or her country of nationality or last legal permanent residence. However, an alien who is a graduate of a foreign medical school pursuing a program in graduate medical education or training may obtain a waiver of such two-year foreign residence requirements if said alien meets the requirements of section 214(l) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1184) and paragraphs (a)(2) and (e) of this section.

(e) Requests for waiver from a State Department of Public Health, or its equivalent, on the basis of Public Law 103-416. (1) Pursuant to Public Law 103-416, in the case of an alien who is a graduate of a medical school pursuing a program in graduate medical education or training, a request for a waiver of the two-year home-country residence and physical presence requirement may be made by a State department of Public Health, or its equivalent. Such waiver shall be subject to the requirements of section 214(l) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1194(l)) and this §41.63.

(2) With respect to such waiver under Public Law 104-416, if such alien is contractually obligated to return to his or her home country upon completion of the graduate medical education or training, the Secretary of State is to be furnished with a statement in writing that the country to which such alien is required to return has no objection to such waiver. The no objection statement shall be furnished to the Secretary of State in the manner and form set forth in paragraph (d) of this section and, additionally, shall bear a notation that it is being furnished pursuant to Public Law 103-416.

(3) The State Department of Public Health, or equivalent agency, shall include in the waiver application the following:

(i) A completed DS-3035. Copies of these forms may be obtained from the Visa Office or online at http://www.travel.state.gov.

(ii) A letter from the Director of the designated State Department of Public Health, or its equivalent, which identifies the foreign medical graduate by name, country of nationality or country of last legal permanent residence, and date of birth, and states that it is in the public interest that a waiver of the two-year home residence requirement be granted;

(iii) An employment contract between the foreign medical graduate and the health care facility named in the waiver application, to include the name and address of the health care facility, and the specific geographical area or areas in which the foreign medical graduate will practice medicine. The employment contract shall include a statement by the foreign medical graduate that he or she agrees to meet the requirements set forth in section 214(l) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. The term of the employment contract shall be at least three years and the geographical areas of employment shall only be in areas, within the respective state, designated by the Secretary of Health and Human Services as having a shortage of health care professionals, unless the waiver request is for an alien who will practice medicine in a facility that serves patients who reside in one or more geographic areas so designated by the Secretary of Health and Human Services without regard to whether such facility is located within such a designated geographic area. For the latter situation, which will be referred to as “non-designated requests”, the contract should also state that the term of the employment contract shall be at least three years and employment shall only be in a facility that serves patients who reside in one or more geographic areas so designed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services as having a shortage of health care professionals.

(iv) Evidence establishing that the geographic area or areas in the state in which the foreign medical graduate will practice medicine or where patients who will be served by the foreign medical graduates reside, are areas which have been designated by the Secretary of Health and Human Services as having a shortage of health care professionals. For purposes of this paragraph, the geographic area or areas must be designated by the Department of Health and Human Services as a Health Professional Shortage Area (“HPSA”) or as a Medically Underserved Area/Medically Underserved Population (“MUA/MUP”).

(v) Copies of all forms IAP 66 or DS-2019 issued to the foreign medical graduate seeking the waiver;

(vi) A copy of the foreign medical graduate's curriculum vitae;

(vii) If the foreign medical graduate is otherwise contractually required to return to his or her home country at the conclusion of the graduate medical education or training, a copy of the statement of no objection from the foreign medical graduate's country of nationality or last residence; and,

(viii) Because of the numerical limitations on the approval of waivers under Public Law 103-416, i.e., no more than the maximum number of waivers for each State each fiscal year as mandated by law, each application from a State Department of Public Health, or its equivalent, shall be numbered sequentially, beginning on October 1 of each year. The “non-designated” requests will also be numbered sequentially with appropriate identifier.

(4) The Waiver Review Division shall review the program, policy, and foreign relations aspects of the case and forward its recommendation to the Secretary of DHS. Except as set forth in paragraph (g)(4) of this section, the recommendation of the Waiver Review Division shall constitute the recommendation of the Department of State.

(f) Changed circumstances. An applicant for a waiver on the grounds of exceptional hardship or probable persecution on account of race, religion, or political opinion, has a continuing obligation to inform the Department of Homeland Security of changed circumstances material to his or her pending application.

(g) The Waiver Review Board. (1) The Waiver Review Board (“Board”) shall consist of the following persons or their designees:

(i) The Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Bureau of Consular Affairs;

(ii) The Director of Office of Public Affairs for the Bureau of Consular Affairs;

(iii) The Legislative Management Officer for Consular Affairs, Bureau of Legislative Affairs;

(iv) The Director of the Office of Exchange Coordination and Designation in the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs; and

(v) The Director of the Office of Policy and Evaluation in the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

(2) A person who has had substantial prior involvement in a particular case referred to the Board may not be appointed to, or serve on, the Board for that particular case unless the Bureau of Consular Affairs determines that the individual's inclusion on the Board is otherwise necessary or practicably unavoidable.

(3) The Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Consular Affairs, or his or her designee, shall serve as Board Chairman. No designee under this paragraph (g)(3) shall serve for more than 2 years.

(4) Cases will be referred to the Board at the discretion of the Chief, Waiver Review Division, of the Visa Office. The Chief, Waiver Review Division, or his or her designee may, at the Chairman's discretion, appear and present facts related to the case but shall not participate in Board deliberations.

(5) The Chairman of the Board shall be responsible for convening the Board and distributing all necessary information to its members. Upon being convened, the Board shall review the case file and weigh the request against the program, policy, and foreign relations aspects of the case.

(6) The Bureau of Consular Affairs shall appoint, on a case-by-case basis, from among the attorneys in the State Department's Office of Legal Advisor one attorney to serve as legal advisor to the Board.

(7) At the conclusion of its review of the case, the Board shall make a written recommendation either to grant or to deny the waiver application. The written recommendation of a majority of the Board shall constitute the recommendation of the Board. Such recommendation shall be promptly transmitted by the Chairman to the Chief, Waiver Review Division.

(8) At the conclusion of its review of the case, the Board shall make a written recommendation either to grant or to deny the waiver application. The written recommendation of a majority of the Board shall constitute the recommendation of the Board. Such recommendation shall be promptly transmitted by the Chairman to the Chief, Waiver Review Division.

[58 FR 15196, Mar. 19, 1993; 58 FR 18305, Apr. 8, 1993; 58 FR 48448, Sept. 16, 1993; 60 FR 16787, 16788, Apr. 3, 1995; 60 FR 53125, Oct. 12, 1995; 62 FR 19222, Apr. 21, 1997; 62 FR 28803, May 28, 1997. Redesignated and amended at 64 FR 54539, 54540, Oct. 7, 1999; 67 FR 77160, Dec. 17, 2002; 72 FR 10061, Mar. 7, 2007]

return arrow Back to Top

Subpart H—Transit Aliens

§41.71   Transit aliens.

(a) Transit aliens—general. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant transit alien under INA 101(a) (15) (C) if the consular officer is satisfied that the alien:

(1) Intends to pass in immediate and continuous transit through the United States;

(2) Is in possession of a common carrier ticket or other evidence of transportation arrangements to the alien's destination;

(3) Is in possession of sufficient funds to carry out the purpose of the transit journey, or has sufficient funds otherwise available for that purpose; and

(4) Has permission to enter some country other than the United States following the transit through the United States, unless the alien submits satisfactory evidence that such advance permission is not required.

(b) Certain aliens in transit to United Nations. An alien within the provisions of paragraph (3), (4), or (5) of section 11 of the Headquarters Agreement with the United Nations, to whom a visa is to be issued for the purpose of applying for admission solely in transit to the United Nations Headquarters District, may upon request or at the direction of the Secretary of State be issued a nonimmigrant visa bearing the symbol C-2. If such a visa is issued, the recipient shall be subject to such restrictions on travel within the United States as may be provided in regulations prescribed by the Secretary of Homeland Security.

return arrow Back to Top

Subpart I—Fiance(e)s and Other Nonimmigrants

§41.81   Fiancé(e) or spouse of a U.S. citizen and derivative children.

(a) Fiancé(e). An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant fiancé(e) under INA 101(a)(15)(K)(i) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien is qualified under that provision and the consular officer has received a petition filed by a U.S. citizen to confer nonimmigrant status as a fiancé(e) on the alien, which has been approved by the DHS under INA 214(d), or a notification of such approval from that Service;

(2) The consular officer has received from the alien the alien's sworn statement of ability and intent to conclude a valid marriage with the petitioner within 90 days of arrival in the United States; and

(3) The alien has met all other qualifications in order to receive a nonimmigrant visa, including the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section.

(b) Spouse. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant spouse under INA 101(a)(15)(K)(ii) when all of the following requirements are met:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien is qualified under that provision and the consular officer has received a petition approved by the DHS pursuant to INA 214(p)(1), that was filed by the U.S. citizen spouse of the alien in the United States.

(2) If the alien's marriage to the U.S. citizen was contracted outside of the United States, the alien is applying in the country in which the marriage took place, or if there is no consular post in that country, then at a consular post designated by the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Visa Services to accept immigrant visa applications for nationals of that country.

(3) If the marriage was contracted in the United States, the alien is applying in a country as provided in part 42, §42.61 of this chapter.

(4) The alien otherwise has met all applicable requirements in order to receive a nonimmigrant visa, including the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section.

(c) Child. An alien is classifiable under INA 101(a)(15)(K)(iii) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien is the child of an alien classified under INA 101(a)(15)(K)(i) or (ii) and is accompanying or following to join the principal alien; and

(2) The alien otherwise has met all other applicable requirements in order to receive a nonimmigrant visa, including the requirements of paragraph (d) of this section.

(d) Eligibility as an immigrant required. The consular officer, insofar as is practicable, must determine the eligibility of an alien to receive a nonimmigrant visa under paragraphs (a), (b) or (c) of this section as if the alien were an applicant for an immigrant visa, except that the alien must be exempt from the vaccination requirement of INA 212(a)(1) and the labor certification requirement of INA 212(a)(5).

[66 FR 19393, Apr. 16, 2001]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.82   Certain parents and children of section 101(a)(27)(I) special immigrants. [Reserved]

§41.83   Certain witnesses and informants.

(a) General. An alien shall be classifiable under the provisions of INA 101(a)(15)(S) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien qualifies under the provisions of that section; and

(2)(i) The consular officer has received verification from the Department of State, Visa Office, that:

(A) in the case of INA 101(a)(15)(S)(i) the DHS has certified that the alien is accorded such classification, or

(B) in the case of INA 101(a)(15)(S)(ii) the Assistant Secretary of State for Consular Affairs on behalf of the Secretary of State and the DHS have certified that the alien is accorded such classification;

(ii) and the alien is granted an INA 212(d)(1) waiver of any INA 212(a) ground of ineligibility known at the time of verification.

(b) Certification of S visa status. The certification of status under INA 101(a)(15)(S)(i) by the Secretary of Homeland Security or of status under INA 101(a)(15)(S)(ii) by the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Homeland Security acting jointly does not establish that the alien is eligible to receive a nonimmigrant visa.

(c) Validity of visa. The period of validity of a visa authorized on the basis of paragraph (a) of this section shall not exceed the period indicated in the certification required in paragraph (b) and shall not in any case exceed the period of three years.

[61 FR 1838, Jan. 24, 1996, as amended at 71 FR 34521, June 15, 2006]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.84   Victims of trafficking in persons.

(a) Eligibility. An alien may be classifiable as a parent, spouse or child under INA 101(a)(15)(T)(ii) if:

(1) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien has the required relationship to an alien who has been granted status by the Secretary for Homeland Security under INA 101(a)(15)(T)(i);

(2) The consular officer is satisfied that the alien is otherwise admissible under the immigration laws of the United States; and

(3) The consular officer has received an DHS-approved I-914, Supplement A, evidencing that the alien is the spouse, child, or parent of an alien who has been granted status under INA 101(a)(15)(T)(i).

(b) Visa validity. A qualifying family member may apply for a nonimmigrant visa under INA(a)(15)(T)(ii) only during the period in which the principal applicant is in status under INA 101(a)(15)(T)(i). Any visa issued pursuant to such application shall be valid only for a period of three years or until the expiration of the principal alien's status as an alien classified under INA 101(a)(15)(T)(i), whichever is shorter.

[68 FR 37964, June 26, 2003]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.86   Certain spouses and children of lawful permanent resident aliens.

(a) Definition of “remains pending”. For the purposes of this section, a visa application “remains pending” if the applicant has applied for an immigrant visa in accordance with the definition in part 40, §40.1(l)(2) and the visa has neither been issued, nor refused for any reason under applicable law and regulation.

(b) Entitlement to classification. A consular officer may classify an alien as a nonimmigrant under INA 101(a)(15)(V) if:

(1) The consular officer has received notification from the Department of State or the Department of Justice that a petition to accord status to the alien as a spouse or child pursuant to INA 203(a)(2)(A) was filed on or before December 21, 2000; or

(2) The alien is eligible to derive benefits pursuant to INA 203(d) as a child of an alien described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section and such alien has qualified for V classification; and

(3) It has been three years or more since the filing date of the petition described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section and applicable to paragraph (b)(2) of this section and either:

(i) The petition has not been approved; or

(ii) If it has been approved, either no immigrant visa number is immediately available or the alien's application for adjustment of status or the alien's application for a visa remains pending.

(c) Eligibility as an immigrant required. The consular officer, insofar as practicable, must determine the eligibility of an alien described in paragraph (b) of this section to receive a nonimmigrant visa under INA 101(a)(15)(V), other than an alien who previously has been granted V status in the United States by DHS, as if the alien were an applicant for an immigrant visa, except that the alien is exempt from the vaccination requirement of INA 212(a)(1), the labor certification requirement of INA 212(a)(5) and the unlawful presence ineligibility of INA 212(a)(9)(B).

(d) Place of application. Notwithstanding the requirements of §41.101, in determining the place of application for an alien seeking a visa pursuant to INA 101(a)(15)(V) the requirements of part 42, §§42.61(a) and (b)(1) of this chapter will apply.

[66 FR 19393, Apr. 16, 2001]

return arrow Back to Top

Subpart J—Application for Nonimmigrant Visa

§41.101   Place of application.

(a) Application for regular visa made at jurisdictional consular office of alien's residence or physical presence. (1) An alien applying for a nonimmigrant visa shall make application at a consular office having jurisdiction over the alien's place of residence, or if the alien is a resident of Taiwan, at the American Institute in Taiwan, unless—

(i) The alien is physically present in the United States and is entitled to apply for issuance or reissuance of a visa under the provisions of §41.111(b); or

(ii) A consular office having jurisdiction over the area in which the alien is physically present but not resident has agreed, as a matter of discretion or at the direction of the Department, to accept the alien's application; or

(iii) The alien is subject to INA 222(g) and must apply as set forth in paragraph (b) or (c) of this section.

(2) The Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Visa Services is authorized to designate the geographical area for which each consular office possesses jurisdiction to process nonimmigrant visa applications.

(b) Place of application for persons subject to INA 222(g). Notwithstanding the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section, an alien whose prior nonimmigrant visa has been voided pursuant to INA 222(g), who is applying for a new nonimmigrant visa, shall make application at a consular office which has jurisdiction in or for the country of the alien's nationality unless extraordinary circumstances have been determined to exist with respect to that alien as set forth in paragraph (c) of this section.

(c) Exceptions based on extraordinary circumstances. (1) An alien physician serving in underserved areas of the United States under the provisions of INA 214(l) for whom an application for a waiver of the 2-year foreign residence requirement and/or a petition to accord H-1B status was filed prior to the end of the alien's authorized period of stay and was subsequently approved, but whose authorized stay expired during the adjudication of such application(s), shall make application in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section.

(2) Any other individual or group whose circumstances are determined to be extraordinary, in accordance with paragraph (d)(1) of this section, by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Visa Services upon the favorable recommendation of an immigration or consular officer, shall make application in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section.

(3) An alien who has, or immediately prior to the alien's last entry into the United States had, a residence in a country other than the country of the alien's nationality shall apply at a consular office with jurisdiction in or for the country of residence.

(4) An alien who is a national and resident of a country in which there is no United States consular office shall apply at a consular office designated by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Visa Services to accept immigrant visa applications from persons of that nationality.

(5) An alien who possesses more than one nationality and who has, or immediately prior to the alien's last entry into the United States had, a residence in one of the countries of the alien's nationality shall apply at a consular office in the country of such residence.

(d) Definitions relevant to INA 222(g). (1) Extraordinary circumstances—Extraordinary circumstances may be found where compelling humanitarian or national interests exist or where necessary for the effective administration of the immigration laws. Extraordinary circumstances shall not be found upon the basis of convenience or financial burden to the alien, the alien's relative, or the alien's employer.

(2) Nationality—For purposes of paragraph (b) of this section, a stateless person shall be considered to be a national of the country which issued the alien's travel document.

(e) Regular visa defined. “Regular visa” means a nonimmigrant visa of any classification which does not bear the title “Diplomatic” or “Official.” A nonimmigrant visa is issued as a regular visa unless the alien falls within one of the classes entitled to a diplomatic or an official visa as described in §41.26(c) or §41.27(c).

(f) Q-2 nonimmigrant visas. The American Consulate General at Belfast is designated to accept applications for the Q-2 visa from residents of the geographic area of Northern Ireland. The American Embassy at Dublin is designated to accept applications for Q-2 visas from residents of the geographic area of the counties of Louth, Monaghan, Cavan, Leitrim, Sligo, and Donegal in the Republic of Ireland. Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, an applicant for a Q-2 visa may not apply at any other consular post. Consular officers at the Consulate General at Belfast and at the Embassy at Dublin have discretion to accept applications for Q-2 visas from aliens who are resident in a qualifying geographic area outside of their respective consular districts, but who are physically present in their consular district.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987; 53 FR 9112, Mar. 21, 1988, as amended at 61 FR 1522, Jan. 22, 1996; 61 FR 53058, Oct. 10, 1996; 61 FR 56439, Nov. 1, 1996; 63 FR 671, Jan. 7, 1998; 63 FR 36366, July 6, 1998; 65 FR 14771, Mar. 17, 2000; 66 FR 38542, July 25, 2001; 67 FR 66046, Oct. 30, 2002]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.102   Personal appearance of applicant.

(a) Except when the requirement of personal appearance has been waived pursuant to paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section, each applicant for a nonimmigrant visa who is at least 14 years of age and not more than 79 years of age must personally appear before and be interviewed by a consular officer, who shall determine on the basis of the applicant's representations, the visa application and other relevant documentation:

(1) The proper nonimmigrant classification, if any, of the alien; and

(2) The alien's eligibility to receive a visa.

(b) Waivers of personal appearance by consular officers. Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section or as otherwise instructed by the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Visa Services, a consular officer may waive the requirement of personal appearance if the consular officer concludes the alien presents no national security concerns requiring an interview and:

(1) Is within a class of nonimmigrants classifiable under the visa symbols A-1, A-2, C-2, C-3 (except attendants, servants, or personal employees of accredited officials), G-1, G-2, G-3, G-4, NATO-1, NATO-2, NATO-3, NATO-4, NATO-5, NATO-6, or is a Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office (TECRO) nonimmigrant classifiable under visa symbol E-1, and is seeking a visa in such classification; or

(2) Is an applicant for a diplomatic or official visa as described in §41.26 or §41.27 of this chapter; or

(3) Is an applicant who is within 12 months of the expiration of the applicant's previously issued visa and:

(i) Is seeking re-issuance of a nonimmigrant visa in the same classification;

(ii) Is applying at the consular post of the applicant's usual residence; and

(iii) Is an applicant for whom the consular officer has no indication of visa ineligibility or of noncompliance with U.S. immigration laws and regulations.

(c) Waivers of personal appearance in the national interest. Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, the Secretary may waive the requirement of personal appearance of an individual applicant or a class of applicants if the Secretary determines that such waiver is in the national interest of the United States.

(d) Waivers of personal appearance in unusual or emergent circumstances. Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Visa Services may waive the requirement of personal appearance of an individual applicant or a class of applicants if the Deputy Assistant Secretary determines that such waiver is necessary as a result of unusual or emergent circumstances.

(e) Cases in which personal appearance may not be waived. Except for a nonimmigrant applicant whose personal appearance is waived under paragraphs (b)(1), (b)(2), or (c) of this section, the personal appearance requirement may not be waived for:

(1) Any nonimmigrant applicant who is not a national or resident of the country in which he or she is applying.

(2) Any nonimmigrant applicant who was previously refused a visa, is listed in CLASS, or otherwise requires a Security Advisory Opinion, unless:

(i) The visa was refused and the refusal was subsequently overcome; or

(ii) The alien was found inadmissible, but the inadmissibility was waived.

(3) Any nonimmigrant applicant who is from a country designated by the Secretary of State as a state sponsor of terrorism, regardless of age, or who is a member of a group or sector designated by the Secretary of State under section 222(h)(2)(F) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

[80 FR 69589, Nov. 10, 2015]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.103   Filing an application.

(a) Filing an application—(1) Filing of application required. Every alien seeking a nonimmigrant visa must make an electronic application on Form DS-160 or, as directed by a consular officer, an application on Form DS-156. The Form DS-160 must be signed electronically by clicking the box designated “Sign Application” in the certification section of the application.

(2) Filing of an electronic application (Form DS-160) or Form DS-156 by alien under 16 or physically incapable. The application for an alien under 16 years of age or one physically incapable of completing an application may be completed and executed by the alien's parent or guardian, or if the alien has no parent or guardian, by any person having legal custody of, or a legitimate interest in, the alien.

(3) Waiver of filing of application when personal appearance is waived. Even if personal appearance of a visa applicant is waived pursuant to 22 CFR 41.102, the requirement for filing an application is not waived.

(b) Application—(1) Preparation of Electronic Nonimmigrant Visa Application (Form DS-160) or, alternatively, Form DS-156. The consular officer shall ensure that the application is fully and properly completed in accordance with the applicable regulations and instructions.

(2) Additional requirements and information as part of application. Applicants who are required to appear for a personal interview must provide a biometric, which will serve to authenticate identity and additionally verify the accuracy and truthfulness of the statements in the application at the time of interview. The consular officer may require the submission of additional necessary information or question an alien on any relevant matter whenever the consular officer believes that the information provided in the application is inadequate to permit a determination of the alien's eligibility to receive a nonimmigrant visa. Additional statements made by the alien become a part of the visa application. All documents required by the consular officer under the authority of §41.105(a) are considered papers submitted with the alien's application within the meaning of INA 221(g)(1).

(3) Signature. The Form DS-160 shall be signed electronically by clicking the box designated “Sign Application” in the certification section of the application. This electronic signature attests to the applicant's familiarity with and intent to be bound by all statements in the NIV application under penalty of perjury. Alternatively, except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, the Form DS-156 shall be signed by the applicant, with intent to be bound by all statement in the NIV application under penalty of perjury.

(4) Registration. The Form DS-160 or the Form DS-156, when duly executed, constitutes the alien's registration for the purposes of INA 221(b).

[73 FR 23068, Apr. 29, 2008]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.104   Passport requirements.

(a) Passports defined. “Passport” as defined in INA 101(a)(30) is not limited to a national passport or to a single document. A passport may consist of two or more documents which, when considered together, fulfill the requirements of a passport, provided that the documentary evidence of permission to enter a foreign country has been issued by a competent authority and clearly meets the requirements of INA 101(a)(30).

(b) Passport requirement. Except for certain persons in the A, C-3, G, and NATO classifications and persons for whom the passport requirement has been waived pursuant to the provisions of INA 212(d)(4), every applicant for a nonimmigrant visa is required to present a passport, as defined above and in INA 101(a)(30), which is valid for the period required by INA 212(a)(7)(B)(i)(I).

(c) A single passport including more than one person. The passport requirement for a nonimmigrant visa may be met by the presentation of a passport including more than one person, if such inclusion is authorized under the laws or regulations of the issuing authority and if a photograph of each visa applicant 16 years of age or over has been attached to the passport by the issuing authority.

(d) Applicants for diplomatic visas. Every applicant for a diplomatic visa must present a diplomatic passport, or the equivalent thereof, having the period of validity required by INA 212(a)(7)(B)(i)(I), unless such requirement has been waived pursuant to the authority contained in INA 212(d)(4) or unless the case falls within the provisions of §41.21(b).

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 56 FR 30428, July 2, 1991; 61 FR 1522, Jan. 22, 1996; 61 FR 53058, Oct. 10, 1996; 66 FR 38543, July 25, 2001; 67 FR 66046, Oct. 30, 2002]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.105   Supporting documents and fingerprinting.

(a) Supporting documents—(1) Authority to require documents. The consular officer is authorized to require documents considered necessary to establish the alien's eligibility to receive a nonimmigrant visa. All documents and other evidence presented by the alien, including briefs submitted by attorneys or other representatives, shall be considered by the consular officer.

(2) Unobtainable documents. If the consular officer is satisfied that a document or record required under the authority of this section is unobtainable, the consular officer may accept satisfactory alternative pertinent evidence. A document or other record shall be considered unobtainable if it cannot be procured without causing the applicant or a member of the applicant's family actual hardship as distinct from normal delay and inconvenience.

(3) Photographs required. Every applicant for a nonimmigrant visa must furnish a photograph in such numbers as the consular officer may require. Photographs must be a reasonable likeness, 112 by 112 inches in size, unmounted, and showing a full, front-face view of the applicant against a light background. At the discretion of the consular officer, head coverings may be permitted provided they do not interfere with the full, front-face view of the applicant. The applicant must sign (full name) on the reverse side of the photographs. The consular officer may use a previously submitted photograph, if he is satisfied that it bears a reasonable likeness to the applicant.

(4) Police certificates. A police certificate is a certification by the police or other appropriate authorities stating what, if anything, their records show concerning the alien. An applicant for a nonimmigrant visa is required to present a police certificate if the consular officer has reason to believe that a police or criminal record exists, except that no police certificate is required in the case of an alien who is within a class of nonimmigrants classifiable under visa symbols A-1, A-2, C-3, G-1 through G-4, NATO-1 through NATO-4 or NATO-6.

(b) Fingerprinting. Every applicant for a nonimmigrant visa must furnish fingerprints, as required by the consular officer.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987; 53 FR 9112, 9172, Mar. 21, 1988, as amended at 61 FR 1522, Jan. 22, 1996; 61 FR 53058, Oct. 10, 1996; 64 FR 13510, Mar. 19, 1999; 67 FR 8478, Feb. 25, 2002; 72 FR 74175, Dec. 31, 2007; 73 FR 49092, Aug. 20, 2008]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.106   Processing.

Consular officers must ensure that the Form DS-160 or, alternatively, Form DS-156 is properly and promptly processed in accordance with the applicable regulations and instructions.

[73 FR 23069, Apr. 29, 2008]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.107   Visa fees.

(a) Fees based on reciprocity. The fees for the issuance of visas, including official visas, to nonimmigrant nationals or stateless residents of each foreign country shall be collected in the amounts prescribed by the Secretary of State unless, on the basis of reciprocity, no fee is chargeable. If practicable, fees will correspond to the total amount of all visa, entry, residence, or other similar fees, taxes or charges assessed or levied against nationals of the United States by the foreign countries of which such nonimmigrants are nationals or stateless residents.

(b) Fees when more than one alien included in visa. A single nonimmigrant visa may be issued to include all eligible family members if the spouse and unmarried minor children of a principal alien are included in one passport. Each alien must execute a separate application. The name of each family member shall be inserted in the space provided in the visa stamp. The visa fee to be collected shall equal the total of the fees prescribed by the Secretary of State for each alien included in the visa, unless upon a basis of reciprocity a lesser fee is chargeable.

(c) Certain aliens exempted from fees. (1) Upon a basis of reciprocity, or as provided in section 13(a) of the Headquarters Agreement with the United Nations (61 Stat. 716; 22 U.S.C. 287, Note), no fee shall be collected for the application for or issuance of a nonimmigrant visa to an alien who is within a class of nonimmigrants classifiable under the visa symbols A, G, C-2, C-3, or NATO, or B-1 issued for participation in an official observer mission to the United Nations, or who is issued a diplomatic visa as defined in §41.26.

(2) The consular officer shall waive the nonimmigrant visa application and issuance fees for an alien who will be engaging in charitable activities for a charitable organization upon the written request of the charitable organization claiming that it will find the fees a financial burden, if the consular officer is satisfied that:

(i) The organization seeking relief from the fees is, if based in the United States, tax-exempt as a charitable organization under the provisions of section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 501(c)(3)); if a foreign organization based outside the United States in a country having laws according recognition to charitable institutions, that it establishes that it is recognized as a charitable institution by that government; and if a foreign organization based in a country without such laws, that it is engaged in activities substantially similar to those underlying section 501(c)(3), and

(ii) The charitable activities in which the alien will engage are specified and will be a part of, or will be related to and in support of, the organization's provision of services, including but not limited to health care, food and housing, job training, and similar direct services and assistance to the poor and needy, and

(iii) The request includes the location of the proposed activities, the number and identifying data of each of the alien(s) who will be applying for visas, and

(iv) The proposed duration of the alien(s)'s temporary stay in the United States is reasonably consistent with the charitable purpose for which the alien(s) seek to enter the United States.

(3) Foreign national employees of the U. S. Government who are travelling to the United States on official business in connection with that employment.

(d) Refund of fees. A fee collected for the issuance of a nonimmigrant visa is refundable only if the principal officer at a post or the officer in charge of a consular section determines that the visa was issued in error or could not be used as a result of action taken by the U.S. Government for which the alien was not responsible and over which the alien had no control.

(e)(1) Visa processing surcharge. In addition to the collection of the fee prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section, a consular officer shall collect or ensure the collection of a surcharge for the processing of applications for machine readable nonimmigrant visas and for machine readable combined border crossing cards in the amount specified by the Secretary of State from such applicants as the Secretary of State shall designate. Such surcharge is refundable only if, as a result of action taken by the U.S. Government for which the alien was not responsible and over which the alien had no control, the alien's application is not processed.

(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (e)(1) of this section, a consular officer shall collect or insure the collection of a processing fee for a machine-readable combined border crossing card and nonimmigrant visa in an amount determined by the Secretary and set forth in 22 CFR 22.1 to be sufficient only to cover the cost for manufacturing the combined card and visa if:

(i) The alien is a Mexican citizen under the age of 15;

(ii) The alien is applying in Mexico; and

(iii) The alien has at least one parent or guardian who has a visa or is applying for a machine-readable combined border crossing card and visa.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 59 FR 25325, May 16, 1994; 63 FR 24108, May 1, 1998; 63 FR 52970, Oct. 2, 1998; 65 FR 52307, Aug. 29, 2000; 66 FR 17511, Apr. 2, 2001; 66 FR 38543, July 25, 2001; 67 FR 38893, June 6, 2002; 67 FR 66046, Oct. 30, 2002]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.108   Medical examination.

(a) Requirements for medical examination. An applicant for a nonimmigrant visa shall be required to take a medical examination if:

(1) The alien is an applicant for a K nonimmigrant visa as a fiance(e) of a U.S. citizen or as the child of such an applicant; or,

(2) The alien is seeking admission for medical treatment and the consular officer considers a medical examination advisable; or,

(3) The consular officer has reason to believe that a medical examination might disclose that the alien is medically ineligible to receive a visa.

(b) Examination by panel physician. The required examination, which must be carried out in accordance with United States Public Health Service regulations, shall be conducted by a physician selected by the alien from a panel of physicians approved by the consular officer or, if the alien is in the United States, by a medical officer of the United States Public Health Service or by a contract physician from a list of physicians approved by the DHS for the examination of INA 245 adjustment of status applicants.

(c) Panel physician facility requirements. A consular officer may not include the name of a physician on the panel of physicians referred to in paragraph (b) of this section unless the physician has facilities to perform required serological and X-ray tests or is in a position to refer applicants to a qualified laboratory for such tests.

return arrow Back to Top

Subpart K—Issuance of Nonimmigrant Visa

§41.111   Authority to issue visa.

(a) Issuance outside the United States. Any consular officer is authorized to issue regular and official visas. Diplomatic visas may be issued only by:

(1) A consular officer attached to a U.S. diplomatic mission, if authorized to do so by the Chief of Mission; or

(2) A consular officer assigned to a consular office under the jurisdiction of a diplomatic mission, if so authorized by the Department or the Chief, Deputy Chief, or Counselor for Consular Affairs of that mission, or, if assigned to a consular post not under the jurisdiction of a diplomatic mission, by the principal officer of that post.

(b) Issuance in the United States in certain cases. The Deputy Assistant Secretary for Visa Services and such officers of the Department as the former may designate are authorized, in their discretion, to issue nonimmigrant visas, including diplomatic visas, to:

(1) Qualified aliens who are currently maintaining status and are properly classifiable in the A, C-2, C-3, G or NATO category and intend to reenter the United States in that status after a temporary absence abroad and who also present evidence that:

(i) They have been lawfully admitted in that status or have, after admission, had their classification changed to that status; and

(ii) Their period of authorized stay in the United States in that status has not expired; and

(2) Other qualified aliens who:

(i) Are currently maintaining status in the E, H, I, L, O, or P nonimmigrant category;

(ii) Intend to reenter the United States in that status after a temporary absence abroad; and

(iii) Who also present evidence that:

(A) They were previously issued visas at a consular office abroad and admitted to the United States in the status which they are currently maintaining; and

(B) Their period of authorized admission in that status has not expired.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 66 FR 12738, Feb. 28, 2001]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.112   Validity of visa.

(a) Significance of period of validity of visa. The period of validity of a nonimmigrant visa is the period during which the alien may use it in making application for admission. The period of visa validity has no relation to the period of time the immigration authorities at a port of entry may authorize the alien to stay in the United States.

(b) Validity of visa and number of applications for admission. (1) Except as provided in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section, a nonimmigrant visa shall have the validity prescribed in schedules provided to consular officers by the Department, reflecting insofar as practicable the reciprocal treatment accorded U.S. nationals, U.S. permanent residents, or aliens granted refugee status in the U.S. by the government of the country of which the alien is a national, permanent resident, refugee or stateless resident.

(2) Notwithstanding paragraph (b)(1) of this section, United States nonimmigrant visas shall have a maximum validity period of 10 years.

(3) An unexpired visa is valid for application for admission even if the passport in which the visa is stamped has expired, provided the alien is also in possession of a valid passport issued by the authorities of the country of which the alien is a national.

(c) Limitation on validity. If warranted in an individual case, a consular officer may issue a nonimmigrant visa for:

(1) A period of validity that is less than that prescribed on a basis of reciprocity,

(2) A number of applications for admission within the period of the validity of the visa that is less than that prescribed on a basis of reciprocity,

(3) Application for admission at a specified port or at specified ports of entry, or

(4) Use on and after a given date subsequent to the date of issuance.

(d) Automatic extension of validity at ports of entry. (1) Provided that the requirements set out in paragraph (d)(2) of this section are fully met, the following provisions apply to nonimmigrant aliens seeking readmission at ports of entry:

(i) The validity of an expired nonimmigrant visa issued under INA 101(a)(15) may be considered to be automatically extended to the date of application for readmission; and

(ii) In cases where the original nonimmigrant classification of an alien has been changed by DHS to another nonimmigrant classification, the validity of an expired or unexpired nonimmigrant visa may be considered to be automatically extended to the date of application for readmission, and the visa may be converted as necessary to that changed classification.

(2) The provisions in paragraph (d)(1) of this section are applicable only in the case of a nonimmigrant alien who:

(i) Is in possession of a Form I-94, Arrival-Departure Record, endorsed by DHS to show an unexpired period of initial admission or extension of stay, or, in the case of a qualified F or J student or exchange visitor or the accompanying spouse or child of such an alien, is in possession of a current Form I-20, Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status, or Form IAP-66, Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor Status, issued by the school the student has been authorized to attend by DHS, or by the sponsor of the exchange program in which the alien has been authorized to participate by DHS, and endorsed by the issuing school official or program sponsor to indicate the period of initial admission or extension of stay authorized by DHS;

(ii) Is applying for readmission after an absence not exceeding 30 days solely in contiguous territory, or, in the case of a student or exchange visitor or accompanying spouse or child meeting the stipulations of paragraph (d)(2)(i) of this section, after an absence not exceeding 30 days in contiguous territory or adjacent islands other than Cuba;

(iii) Has maintained and intends to resume nonimmigrant status;

(iv) Is applying for readmission within the authorized period of initial admission or extension of stay;

(v) Is in possession of a valid passport;

(vi) Does not require authorization for admission under INA 212(d)(3); and

(vii) Has not applied for a new visa while abroad.

(3) The provisions in paragraphs (d)(1) and (d)(2) of this section shall not apply to the nationals of countries identified as supporting terrorism in the Department's annual report to Congress entitled Patterns of Global Terrorism.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987; 53 FR 9112, 9172, Mar. 21, 1988, as amended at 55 FR 36028, Oct. 31, 1990; 62 FR 24332, May 5, 1997; 66 FR 38543, July 25, 2001; 67 FR 10323, Mar. 7, 2002; 67 FR 66046, Oct. 30, 2002]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.113   Procedures in issuing visas.

(a) Evidence of visa. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a nonimmigrant visa shall be evidenced by a physical visa placed in the alien's passport or by an electronic visa located in the Department's records. The appropriate symbol as prescribed in §41.12, showing the classification of the alien, shall be entered on the visa.

(b) Cases in which a physical visa is not placed in passport. In the following cases a physical visa shall be placed on the prescribed Form DS-232. In issuing such a visa, a notation shall be made on the Form DS-232 on which the visa is placed, specifying the pertinent subparagraph of this paragraph under which the action is taken.

(1) The alien's passport was issued by a government with which the United States does not have formal diplomatic relations, unless the Department has specifically authorized the placing of the visa in such passport;

(2) The passport requirement has been waived; or

(3) In other cases as authorized by the Department.

(c) Visa format. A machine-readable visa shall be in the format designated by the Department, and contain, at a minimum, the following data:

(1) Full name of the applicant;

(2) Visa type/class;

(3) Location of the visa issuing office;

(4) Passport number;

(5) Sex;

(6) Date of birth;

(7) Nationality;

(8) Number of applications for admission authorized, or the letter “M” for multiple applications for admission authorized;

(9) Date of issuance;

(10) Date of expiration;

(11) Visa control number.

(d) Insertion of name, petition, and derivative status notation. (1) The surname and given name of the visa recipient shall be shown on the visa in the space provided.

(2) If the visa is being issued upon the basis of a petition approved by the Secretary of Homeland Security, the number of the petition, if any, the period for which the 'alien's admission has been authorized, and the name of the petitioner shall be reflected in the annotation field on the visa.

(3) In the case of an alien who derives status from a principal alien, the name of the principal alien and of the petitioner shall be reflected in the annotation field of the visa.

(e) Period of validity. If a nonimmigrant visa is issued for an unlimited number of applications for admission within the period of validity, the letter “M” shall be shown under the word “entries”. Otherwise the number of permitted applications for admission shall be identified numerically. The date of issuance and the date of expiration of the visa shall be shown at the appropriate places in the visa by day, month, and year in that order. The standard three letter abbreviation for the month shall be used in all cases.

(f) Restriction to specified port(s) of entry. If a nonimmigrant visa is valid for admission only at one or more specified ports of entry, the names of those ports shall be entered in the annotation field. In cases where there is insufficient room to list the port(s) of entry, they shall be listed by hand on a clean passport page. Reference shall be made in the visa's annotation field citing the passport page upon which the port(s) of entry are listed.

(g) Delivery of visa. In issuing a nonimmigrant visa, the consular officer should deliver the passport containing the visa, or the prescribed Form DS-232 which bears the visa, to the alien or to the alien's authorized representative. Any relevant evidence furnished by the alien in accordance with §41.103(b) should be retained, as required or necessary.

(h) Disposition of supporting documents. Original supporting documents furnished by the alien should be returned for presentation, if necessary, to the immigration authorities at the port of entry. Duplicate copies may be retained in the consular system, as required or necessary.

(i) Review of nonimmigrant visa issuances. Nonimmigrant visa issuances must be reviewed, in accordance with guidance by the Secretary of State, by consular supervisors, or a designated alternate, to ensure compliance with applicable laws and procedures.

[80 FR 67315, Nov. 2, 2015]

return arrow Back to Top

Subpart L—Refusals and Revocations

§41.121   Refusal of nonimmigrant visas.

(a) Grounds for refusal. Nonimmigrant visa refusals must be based on legal grounds, such as one or more provisions of INA 212(a), INA 212(e), INA 214(b) or (f) or (l) (as added by Section 625 of Pub. L. 104-208), INA 221(g), INA 222(g), or other applicable law. Certain classes of nonimmigrant aliens are exempted from specific provisions of INA 212(a) under INA 102 and, upon a basis of reciprocity, under INA 212(d)(8). When a visa application has been properly completed and executed in accordance with the provisions of the INA and the implementing regulations, the consular officer must issue the visa, refuse the visa, or, pursuant to an outstanding order under INA 243(d), discontinue granting the visa.

(b) Refusal procedure. (1) When a consular officer knows or has reason to believe a visa applicant is ineligible and refuses the issuance of a visa, he or she must inform the alien of the ground(s) of ineligibility (unless disclosure is barred under INA 212(b)(2) or (3)) and whether there is, in law or regulations, a mechanism (such as a waiver) to overcome the refusal. The officer shall note the reason for the refusal on the application. Upon refusing the nonimmigrant visa, the consular officer shall retain the original of each document upon which the refusal was based, as well as each document indicating a possible ground of ineligibility, and should return all other supporting documents supplied by the applicant.

(2) If an alien, who has not yet filed a visa application, seeks advice from a consular officer, who knows or has reason to believe that the alien is ineligible to receive a visa on grounds which cannot be overcome by the presentation of additional evidence, the officer shall so inform the alien. The consular officer shall inform the applicant of the provision of law or regulations upon which a refusal of a visa, if applied for, would be based (subject to the exception in paragraph (b)(1) of this section). If practicable, the consular officer should request the alien to execute a nonimmigrant visa application in order to make a formal refusal. If the individual fails to execute a visa application in these circumstances, the consular officer shall treat the matter as if a visa had been refused and create a record of the presumed ineligibility which shall be filed in the consular office.

(c) Nonimmigrant refusals must be reviewed, in accordance with guidance by the Secretary of State, by consular supervisors, or a designated alternate, to ensure compliance with laws and procedures. If the ground(s) of ineligibility upon which the visa was refused cannot be overcome by the presentation of additional evidence, the refusal must be reviewed without delay; that is, on the day of the refusal or as soon as it is administratively possible. If the ground(s) of ineligibility may be overcome by the presentation of additional evidence, and the applicant has indicated the intention to submit such evidence, a review of the refusal may be deferred for not more than 120 days. If the reviewing officer disagrees with the decision and he or she has a consular commission and title, the reviewing officer can assume responsibility and readjudicate the case. If the reviewing officer does not have a consular commission and title, he or she must consult with the adjudicating officer, or with the Visa Office, to resolve any disagreement.

(d) Review of refusal by Department. The Department may request a consular officer in a specific case or in specified classes of cases to submit a report if a visa has been refused. The Department will review each report and may furnish an advisory opinion to the consular officer for assistance in considering the case further. If the officer believes that action contrary to an advisory opinion should be taken, the case shall be resubmitted to the Department with an explanation of the proposed action. Rulings of the Department concerning an interpretation of law, as distinguished from an application of the law to the facts, shall be binding upon consular officers.

[52 FR 42597, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended at 56 FR 30428, July 2, 1991; 63 FR 671, Jan. 7, 1998; 66 FR 10364, Feb. 15, 2001; 71 FR 50339, Aug. 25, 2006; 84 FR 16612, Apr. 22, 2019]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.122   Revocation of visas.

(a) Grounds for revocation by consular officers. A consular officer, the Secretary, or a Department official to whom the Secretary has delegated this authority is authorized to revoke a nonimmigrant visa at any time, in his or her discretion.

(b) Provisional revocation—(1) General. A provisional revocation is subject to reversal through internal procedures established by the Department of State. Upon reversal of the revocation, the visa immediately resumes the validity provided for on its face. Provisional revocation shall have the same force and effect as any other visa revocation under INA 221(i), unless and until the revocation has been reversed. Neither the provisional revocation of a visa nor the reversal of a provisional revocation limits, in any way, the revocation authority provided for under INA 221(i), with respect to the particular visa or any other visa.

(2) Pending visa eligibility determination. A consular officer, the Secretary, or any Department official to whom the Secretary has delegated this authority may provisionally revoke a nonimmigrant visa while considering information related to whether a visa holder is eligible for the visa.

(3) Automatic provisional revocation based on failure to comply with all EVUS requirements. Visas held by individuals subject to the Electronic Visa Update System (EVUS) who have not complied with the conditions described in 8 CFR 215.24 or whose notification of compliance has expired or been rescinded are automatically provisionally revoked and are no longer valid for travel to the United States, without further notice to the visa holder. The automatic provisional revocation pursuant to this paragraph (b)(3) shall be automatically reversed upon compliance with EVUS requirements set out at 8 CFR part 215, subpart B, as confirmed by receipt of a notification of compliance. A visa revoked on grounds other than failure to comply with EVUS shall remain revoked, notwithstanding compliance with EVUS.

(c) Notice of revocation. Unless otherwise instructed by the Department, a consular officer shall, if practicable, notify the alien to whom the visa was issued that the visa was revoked or provisionally revoked. Regardless of delivery of such notice, once the revocation has been entered into the Department's Consular Lookout and Support System (CLASS), the visa is no longer to be considered valid for travel to the United States. The date of the revocation shall be indicated in CLASS and on any notice sent to the alien to whom the visa was issued. This paragraph (c) does not apply to provisional revocations under paragraph (b)(3) of this section.

(d) Procedure for physically canceling visas. Except for provisional revocations pursuant to paragraph (b)(3) of this section, a nonimmigrant visa that is revoked shall be canceled by writing or stamping the word “REVOKED” plainly across the face of the visa, if the visa is available to the consular officer. The failure or inability to physically cancel the visa does not affect the validity of the revocation.

(e) Revocation of visa by immigration officer. An immigration officer is authorized to revoke a valid visa by physically canceling it in accordance with the procedure described in paragraph (d) of this section if:

(1) The alien obtains an immigrant visa or an adjustment of status to that of permanent resident;

(2) The alien is ordered excluded from the United States under INA 236, as in effect prior to April 1, 1997, or removed from the United States pursuant to INA 235;

(3) The alien is notified pursuant to INA 235 by an immigration officer at a port of entry that the alien appears to be inadmissible to the United States, and the alien requests and is granted permission to withdraw the application for admission;

(4) A final order of deportation or removal or a final order granting voluntary departure with an alternate order of deportation or removal is entered against the alien;

(5) The alien has been permitted by DHS to depart voluntarily from the United States;

(6) DHS has revoked a waiver of inadmissibility granted pursuant to INA 212(d)(3)(A) in relation to the visa that was issued to the alien;

(7) The visa is presented in connection with an application for admission to the United States by a person other than the alien to whom the visa was issued;

(8) The visa has been physically removed from the passport in which it was issued; or

(9) The visa has been issued in a combined Mexican or Canadian B-1/B-2 visa and border crossing identification card, and the immigration officer makes the determination specified in §41.32(c) with respect to the alien's Mexican citizenship and/or residence or the determination specified in §41.33(b) with respect to the alien's status as a permanent resident of Canada.

[76 FR 23479, Apr. 27, 2011, as amended at 81 FR 72523, Oct. 20, 2016]

return arrow Back to Top

§41.123   Discontinuance of granting nonimmigrant visa pursuant to INA 243(d).

(a) Grounds for discontinuance of granting a visa. Consular officers in a country subject to an order by the Secretary under INA 243(d) shall discontinue granting nonimmigrant visas for categories of nonimmigrant visas specified in the order of the Secretary (or his or her designee), and pursuant to procedures dictated by the Department.

(b) Discontinuance procedure—(1) Applications refused or discontinued only. Starting on the day the Secretary's (or designee's) order to discontinue granting visas takes effect (effective date), no visas falling within the scope of the order, as described by the order, may be issued in the referenced country to an applicant who falls within the scope of the order, except as otherwise expressly provided in the order or related Department instructions. Beginning on the effective date, a consular officer must refuse the visa if the individual is not eligible for the visa under INA 212(a), INA 221(g), or other applicable law, but if the applicant is otherwise eligible, must process the application by discontinuing granting, regardless of when the application was filed, if the applicant falls within the scope of the order and no exception applies. The application processing fee will not be refunded. The requirement to discontinue issuance may not be waived, and continues until the sanction is terminated as described below.

(2) Geographic applicability. Visa sanctions under INA 243(d) only apply to visa issuance in the country that is sanctioned. If a consular officer has a reason to believe that a visa applicant potentially subject to INA 243(d) sanctions is applying at a post outside the sanctioned country to evade visa sanctions under INA 243(d) (e.g., the applicant provides no credible explanation for applying outside the country), the consular officer will transfer the case to the consular post in the consular district where INA 243(d) sanctions apply, review any other applicable Department instructions, and proceed accordingly. When cases are transferred to a consular district where INA 243(d) sanctions apply, the adjudication will be subject to the discontinuation of issuance under the sanctions.

(c) Termination of sanction. The Department shall notify consular officers in an affected country when the sanction under INA 243(d) has been lifted. After notification, normal consular operations may resume consistent with these regulations and guidance from the Department. Once the sanction under INA 243(d) is lifted, no new application processing fee is required in cases where issuance has been discontinued pursuant to an INA 243(d) order, and consular officers in the affected post must adjudicate the visa consistent with regulations and Department guidance. Consular officers may require applicants to update the visa application forms, must conduct any necessary adjudicatory steps, and may re-interview the applicant to determine eligibility.

[84 FR 16612, Apr. 22, 2019]

return arrow Back to Top