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Title 19 Part 151

Title 19 → Chapter I → Part 151

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 19 Part 151

e-CFR data is current as of November 19, 2018

Title 19Chapter I → Part 151


Title 19: Customs Duties


PART 151—EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE


Contents
§151.0   Scope.

Subpart I—Cigars, Cigarillos, and Tobacco

§151.111   Cigars, cigarillos, and tobacco of Cuban origin.

Authority: 19 U.S.C. 66, 1202 (General Note 3(i) and (j), Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS)), 1624;

Section 151.11 also issued under 21 U.S.C. 381;

Section 151.21 also issued under the provisions of Chapters 17 and 18, HTSUS;

Section 151.42 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1460, 1584, 1592;

Section 151.43 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1592;

Section 151.46 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1507;

Section 151.62 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1481;

Section 151.63 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1484;

Section 151.66 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1562;

Section 151.68 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1311, 1562;

Section 151.69 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1557, 1562;

Section 151.82 also issued under 19 U.S.C. 1481;

Section 151.91 also issued under the Additional U.S. Notes to Chapter 20, HTSUS.

Source: T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, unless otherwise noted.

Editorial Note: Nomenclature changes to part 151 appear by CBP Dec. No. 16-26, 81 FR 93021, Dec. 20, 2016.

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§151.0   Scope.

This part sets forth general provisions governing the examination and sampling of imported merchandise, as well as specific provisions governing the examination, sampling, and testing of certain particular types of merchandise.

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Subpart A—General

§151.1   Merchandise to be examined.

The port director shall examine such packages or quantities of merchandise as he deems necessary for the determination of duties and for compliance with the Customs laws and any other laws enforced by the Customs Service.

[T.D. 81-240, 46 FR 45130, Sept. 10, 1981]

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§151.2   Quantities to be examined.

(a)(1) Minimum quantities. Not less than one package of every 10 packages of merchandise shall be examined, unless a special regulation permits a lesser number of packages to be examined. Port directors are specially authorized to examine less than one package of every 10 packages, but not less than one package of every invoice, in the case of any merchandise which is:

(i) Imported in packages the contents and values of which are uniform, or

(ii) Imported in packages the contents of which are identical as to character although differing as to quantity and value per package.

(2) Exceptions to minimum quantities. At ports of entry specifically designated by the Commissioner of Customs, the port director is authorized to release, without examination, merchandise of a character which the port director has determined need not be examined in every instance to ensure the protection of the revenue and compliance with the Customs laws and any other laws enforced by the Customs Service.

[T.D. 81-240, 46 FR 45130, Sept. 10, 1981]

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§151.3   Disclosure of examination packages.

Information as to the particular packages which will be examined shall not be made available to the importer, his agent, or any person other than Customs officers necessarily concerned, until the merchandise has arrived within the limits of the port of entry.

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§151.4   Time of examination.

Imported merchandise shall not be opened, examined, or inspected until it has been entered under some form of entry for consumption or warehouse, except in the following cases:

(a) Official Government examination and sampling. Authorized employees of the Customs Service, Food and Drug Administration, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Public Health Service, or other Government agency may for official purposes examine or take samples of merchandise for which entry has not been filed, including merchandise being released under a special permit for immediate delivery.

(b) Perishable merchandise, benzenoid chemicals, and merchandise received without an invoice. An application by the importer to examine merchandise, whether or not covered by an entry for transportation in bond or for exportation, may be granted by the port director, under the conditions listed in §151.5, in the following cases:

(1) Examination of perishable merchandise is desired solely to determine its condition. This is not limited to a single examination, and there is no objection to incidental display to prospective buyers during the examination.

(2) [Reserved]

(3) The importer has been unable to obtain the required documents or information to make the necessary entry, and examination of the merchandise is required to obtain information for the preparation of a pro forma invoice to be used in making entry.

(c) Examination of merchandise entered for transportation under bond or for exportation—(1) Examination, sampling, weighing or emergency operation. As a bona fide incident to exportation or further transportation, the importer of merchandise entered or withdrawn for transportation under bond or for exportation may, upon written application to the port director supported by a valid business reason for the request, be permitted to examine, sample, weigh, or subject his merchandise to an operation required by reason of an emergency, provided that any operation performed on the merchandise does not constitute a manufacture, and that §151.5 is complied with. For conditions governing transshipment and emergency access to the shipment by the carrier, see §18.3 of this chapter.

(2) Nonemergency operation. In cases not involving an emergency, an operation not constituting a manufacture may be permitted under the conditions listed in paragraph (c)(1) of this section if neither the protection of the revenue nor the proper conduct of Customs business requires that the operation be done in a Customs bonded warehouse, provided that the importer's written application for such operation is approved by the port director.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 95-99, 60 FR 62733, Dec. 7, 1995; T.D. 97-82, 62 FR 51771, Oct. 3, 1997]

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§151.5   Conditions for examination prior to entry.

Examination, sampling, weighing, or operation upon merchandise at the importer's request prior to entry for consumption or warehouse, as provided for in §151.4 (b) and (c), shall be subject to the following conditions:

(a) The operation permitted shall be executed under Customs supervision;

(b) If the merchandise is in possession or joint possession of a carrier or container station operator, the concurrence of such carrier or operator shall be obtained; and

(c) The Government shall be reimbursed for the compensation, computed in accordance with §24.17(d) of this chapter, and other expenses of the Customs officer or employee supervising the action permitted.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 95-99, 60 FR 62733, Dec. 7, 1995]

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§151.6   Place of examination.

All merchandise will be examined at the place of arrival, unless examination at another place is required or authorized by the port director in accordance with §151.7 or §151.15 of this part. Except where the merchandise is required by the port director to be examined at the public stores, the importer shall bear any expense involved in preparing the merchandise for Customs examination and in the closing of packages.

[T.D. 84-152, 49 FR 29374, July 20, 1984, as amended by T.D. 93-6, 58 FR 5606, Jan. 22, 1993]

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§151.7   Examination elsewhere than at place of arrival or public stores.

The port director may require or authorize examination at a place other than the place of arrival or the public stores, such as at the importer's premises or at a centralized examination station under §151.15 of this part. If examination at a place other than at the place of arrival or the public stores is authorized it will be subject to the following conditions:

(a) Sealing of packages. If examination is to be made at the importer's premises or other place not under the control of Customs, the port director may require the packages to be corded and sealed by a Customs officer before the packages are removed from the place of arrival. The packages shall be opened only in the presence of the Customs officer authorized to examine their contents.

(b) Preparation for Customs examination and closing of packages. Except when merchandise is required by the port director to be examined at the public stores, the importer shall arrange and bear any expense for preparation of the merchandise for Customs examination and closing of packages.

(c) Reimbursement of expenses outside port limits. If the place of examination is not located within the limits of a port of entry or at a Customs station at which Customs is permanently located, whether or not that location is the place of arrival, the importer shall pay any additional expenses, including actual expenses of travel and subsistence but not the salary during regular hours of duty of the examining officer. However, no collection will be made if the total amount chargeable against one importer for one day amounts to less than 50 cents. If the total amount chargeable amounts to 50 cents or more but less than $1, a minimum charge of $1 will be made.

(d) Bond for removal from Customs custody. Before permitting the removal of merchandise for examination elsewhere than at the public stores, wharf, or other place under the control of Customs, the port director shall require the importer to execute a bond on Customs Form 301, containing the bond conditions set forth in §113.62 of this chapter.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 84-152, 49 FR 29374, July 20, 1984; T.D. 84-213, 49 FR 41186, Oct. 19, 1984; T.D. 93-6, 58 FR 5606, Jan. 22, 1993]

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§151.8   Examination after assembly.

(a) Application by importer. Upon application by the importer, machinery, altars, shrines, and other articles which must be set up or assembled prior to examination may be examined at the mill, factory, or other suitable place after being assembled.

(b) Conditions applicable. The importer shall comply with the conditions set forth in §151.7 (b) through (d). The port director may also require that a deposit be made of the estimated additional expense. The packages need not be corded and sealed in accordance with §151.7(a), but the port director may make such preliminary examination as he deems necessary to identify the merchandise with the invoice.

(c) Removal of merchandise and notification of assembly. After the bond required by §151.7(d) has been filed and any necessary preliminary examination has been made, the port director may permit the merchandise to be removed to the place at which it is to be assembled for examination. Within 90 days after such removal, unless an extension has been applied for and granted by the port director, the importer shall notify the port director that the merchandise has been assembled and is ready for examination, whereupon final examination shall be made.

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§151.9   Immediate transportation entry delivered outside port limits.

When merchandise covered by an immediate transportation entry has been authorized by the port director to be delivered to a place outside a port of entry as provided for in §18.11(a) of this chapter, the provisions of §151.7 must be complied with to the same extent as if the merchandise had been delivered to the port of entry, and then authorized to be examined elsewhere than at the public stores, wharf, or other place under the control of CBP.

[CBP Dec. 17-13, 82 FR 45407, Sept. 28, 2017]

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§151.10   Sampling.

When necessary, an authorized CBP official may obtain samples of merchandise for appraisement, classification, or other official purposes. Samples shall be taken by Customs or a commercial gauger approved in accordance with §151.13. Samples shall be marked to ensure identification and retained according to established policies.

[T.D. 87-39, 52 FR 9787, Mar. 26, 1987]

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§151.11   Request for samples or additional examination packages after release of merchandise.

If an authorized CBP official requires samples or additional examination packages of merchandise which has been released from CBP custody, an authorized CBP official will send the importer a written request, on Customs Form 28, or its electronic equivalent, Request for Information, or other appropriate form, to submit the necessary samples or packages. If the request is not promptly complied with, an authorized CBP official may make a demand under the bond for the return of the necessary merchandise to CBP custody in accordance with §141.113 of this chapter. For purposes of determining admissibility, representatives of the Food and Drug Administration may obtain samples of any food, drug, device, or cosmetic, the importation of which is governed by section 801 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as amended (21 U.S.C. 381).

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 75-152, 40 FR 27444, June 30, 1975; T.D. 84-213, 49 FR 41186, Oct. 19, 1984; CBP Dec. 07-02, 72 FR 4430, Jan. 31, 2007; CBP Dec. 15-14, 80 FR 61291, Oct. 13, 2015]

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§151.12   Accreditation of commercial laboratories.

This section sets forth the requirements for commercial laboratories to obtain accreditation by CBP for the testing of certain commodities, and explains the operation of such accredited laboratories. This section also provides for the imposition of accreditation and reaccreditation fees, sets forth grounds for the suspension and revocation of accreditation, and provides for the imposition of a monetary penalty for an accredited commercial laboratory that fails to adhere to the provisions of this section.

(a) Definitions. For purposes of this section, the following words and phrases have the meanings indicated:

Analysis record. An “analysis record” is a compilation of all documents which have been generated during the course of analysis of a particular sample which, under normal circumstances, may include, both in paper and electronic-form, such documents as work sheets, notes, associated spectra (both spectra of the actual product and any standard spectra used for comparison), photographs and microphotographs, and the laboratory report.

Assistant Commissioner. In §§151.12 and 151.13, references to the “Assistant Commissioner” mean the Assistant Commissioner, Office of Information and Technology, or his designee, located in Washington, D.C.

Check samples. “Check samples” are samples which have been distributed by CBP to accredited laboratories to test their proficiency in a certain area of accreditation.

Commodity Group Brochure. A “Commodity Group Brochure” is a booklet which contains a listing of laboratory methods which commercial laboratories are required to have the capability to perform to qualify for CBP-accreditation in a particular commodity group. The brochures and the Customs and Border Protection Laboratory (CBPL) Methods will specify the particular laboratory testing methods required for particular commodity groups, unless written permission from the Executive Director is given to use an alternate method. Procedures required by the Executive Director may reference applicable general industry testing standards, published by such organizations as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Commodity Group Brochures and a listing of the methods found in the U.S. Customs Laboratory Methods Manual are available from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Attention: Executive Director, Laboratories and Scientific Services, Washington, D.C. 20229 and can also be found on the CBP Web site: www.cbp.gov.

Executive Director. In §§151.12 and 151.13, references to the “Executive Director” mean the Executive Director, Laboratories and Scientific Services, located in Washington, D.C.

(b) What is a “Customs-accredited laboratory”? “Commercial laboratories” are individuals and commercial organizations that analyze merchandise, i.e., determine its composition and/or characteristics, through laboratory analysis. A “Customs-accredited laboratory” is a commercial laboratory, within the United States, that has demonstrated, to the satisfaction of the Executive Director, pursuant to this section, the capability to perform analysis of certain commodities to determine elements relating to the admissibility, quantity, composition, or characteristics of imported merchandise. Customs accreditation extends only to the performance of such functions as are vested in, or delegated to, Customs.

(c) What are the obligations of a Customs-accredited laboratory? A commercial laboratory accredited by Customs agrees to the following conditions and requirements:

(1) To comply with the requirements of part 151, Customs Regulations (19 CFR part 151), and to conduct professional services in conformance with approved standards and procedures, including procedures which may be required by the Commissioner of Customs or the Executive Director;

(2) To have no interest in or other connection with any business or other activity which might affect the unbiased performance of duties as a Customs-accredited laboratory. It is understood that this does not prohibit acceptance of the usual fees for professional services;

(3) To maintain the ability, i.e., the instrumentation, equipment, qualified staff, facilities, etc., to perform the services for which the laboratory is accredited, and allow the Executive Director to evaluate that ability on a periodic basis by such means as on-site inspections, demonstrations of analysis procedures, reviews of submitted records, and proficiency testing through check samples;

(4) To retain those laboratory records beyond the five-year record-retention period and samples (see paragraph (j)(1) of this section) specified by Customs as necessary to address matters concerned in pending litigation, and, if laboratory operations or accreditation cease, to contact Customs immediately regarding the disposition of records/samples retained;

(5) To promptly investigate any circumstance which might affect the accuracy of work performed as an accredited laboratory, to correct the situation immediately, and to notify the port director, the Executive Director, and the Center director of such matters, their consequences, and any corrective action taken or that needs to be taken; and

(6) To immediately notify the port director, the Executive Director, and the Center director of any attempt to impede, influence, or coerce laboratory personnel in the performance of their duties, or of any decision to terminate laboratory operations or accredited status. Further, within 5 days of any changes involving legal name, address, ownership, parent-subsidiary relationships, bond, other offices or sites, or approved signatories to notify the Executive Director by certified mail.

(d) What are the commodity groups for which accreditation may be sought? (1) Commercial laboratories may apply for accreditation to perform tests for any of the commodity groups listed in paragraph (d)(2) of this section. Applicable test procedures are listed in Commodity Group Brochures and the U.S. Customs Laboratory Methods Manual. Application may be made for accreditation in more than one commodity group. At the discretion of the Executive Director accreditation may be granted for subgroups of tests within a commodity group or for commodity groups not specifically enumerated. Once accredited, a Customs-accredited laboratory may apply at any time to expand its accreditation, to add new testing sites, or increase the number of commodity groups or subgroups accredited.

(2) The commodity groups for which accreditation may be sought without special permission from the Executive Director are:

(i) Dairy and Chocolate Products entered under Chapters 4, 18, and 21 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS);

(ii) Food and Food Products entered under Chapters 7-12, 15, 16, and 19-21, HTSUS;

(iii) Botanical Identification—materials and products entered under Chapters 14 and 44-46, HTSUS;

(iv) Sugar, Sugar Syrups, and Confectionery products entered under Chapter 17, HTSUS;

(v) Spirituous Beverages entered under Chapter 22, HTSUS;

(vi) Building Stone, Ceramics, Glassware, and Other Mineral Substances entered under Chapters 25 and 68-70, HTSUS;

(vii) Inorganic Materials, including Inorganic Compounds and Ores, entered under Chapters 26, 28, 31, and 36-38, HTSUS;

(viii) Petroleum and Petroleum Products entered under Chapters 27 and 29, HTSUS;

(ix) Organic Materials, including Intermediates and Pharmaceuticals, entered under Chapters 29, 30, 34, 35, and 38, HTSUS;

(x) Rubber, Plastics, Polymers, Pigments and Paints entered under Chapters 32, 39, and 40, HTSUS;

(xi) Essential Oils and Perfumes entered under Chapter 33, HTSUS;

(xii) Leather and Articles of Leather entered under Chapters 41 and 42, HTSUS;

(xiii) Paper and Paper Products entered under Chapters 47-49, HTSUS;

(xiv) Textiles and Related Products, including footwear and hats, entered under Chapters 50-67, HTSUS; and,

(xv) Metals and Alloys entered under Chapters 72-83, HTSUS.

(e) What are the approved methods of analysis? Customs-accredited laboratories must follow the general or specific testing methods set forth in Commodity Group Brochures and the U.S. Customs Laboratory Methods Manual in the testing of designated commodities, unless the Executive Director gives written permission to use an alternate method. Alternative methods will be considered and approved on a case-by-case basis.

(f) How would a commercial laboratory become a Customs-accredited laboratory?—(1) What should an application contain? An application for Customs accreditation must contain the following information:

(i) The applicant's legal name and the address of its principal place of business and any other facility out of which it will work;

(ii) Detailed statements of ownership and any partnerships, parent-subsidiary relationships, or affiliations with any other domestic or foreign organizations, including, but not limited to, importers, other commercial laboratories, producers, refiners, Customs brokers, or carriers;

(iii) A statement of financial condition;

(iv) If a corporation, a copy of the articles of incorporation and the names of all officers and directors;

(v) The names, titles, and qualifications of each person who will be authorized to sign or approve analysis reports on behalf of the commercial laboratory;

(vi) A complete description of the applicant's facilities, instruments, and equipment;

(vii) An express agreement that if notified by Customs of pending accreditation to execute a bond in accordance with part 113, Customs Regulations (19 CFR part 113), and submit it to the Customs port nearest to the applicant's main office. (The limits of liability on the bond will be established by the Customs port in consultation with the Executive Director. In order to retain Customs accreditation, the laboratory must maintain an adequate bond, as determined by the port director);

(viii) A listing of each commodity group for which accreditation is being sought and, if methods are being submitted for approval which are not specifically provided for in a Commodity Group Brochure and the U.S. Customs Laboratory Methods Manual, a listing of such methods;

(ix) A listing by commodity group of each method according to its Customs Laboratory Method Number for which the laboratory is seeking accreditation;

(x) An express agreement to be bound by the obligations contained in paragraph (c) of this section; and,

(xi) A nonrefundable pre-payment equal to 50 percent of the fixed accreditation fee, as published in the Federal Register and Customs Bulletin, to cover preliminary processing costs. Further, the applicant agrees to pay Customs within 30 days of notification of preliminary accreditation the associated charges assessed for accreditation, i.e., those charges for actual travel and background investigation costs, and the balance of the fixed accreditation fee.

(2) Where should an application be sent? A commercial laboratory seeking accreditation or an extension of an existing accreditation must send a letter of application to the U.S. Customs Service, Attention: Executive Director, Laboratories & Scientific Services, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, D.C. 20229.

(3) How will an application be reviewed?—(i) Physical plant and management system. The facility of the applicant will be inspected to ensure that it is properly equipped to perform the necessary tests and that staff personnel are capable of performing required tests. Customs evaluation of an applicant's professional abilities will be in accordance with the general criteria contained in either the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E548 (Standard Guide for General Criteria Used for Evaluating Laboratory Competence) or the ISO/IEC Guide 25 (General Requirements for the Competence of Calibration and Testing Laboratories). This review will ascertain the laboratory's ability to manage and control the acquisition of technical data. The review will be performed at the time of initial application and upon reaccreditation at three-year intervals.

(ii) Ability to perform tests on specified commodity groups. For each commodity group applied for, the applicant will undergo a separate review of testing capabilities. The specific accreditation will be based on the laboratory's ability to perform the tests required for that commodity group. This will include the qualifications of the technical personnel in this field and the instrument availability required by the test methods. Maintenance of accreditation will be ongoing and may require the submission of test results on periodic check samples. The criteria for acceptance will be based on the laboratory's ability to produce a work product that assists in the proper classification and entry of imported merchandise.

(iii) Determination of competence. The Executive Director will determine the applicant's overall competence, independence, and character by conducting on-site inspections, which may include demonstrations by the applicant of analysis procedures and a review of analysis records submitted, and background investigations. The Executive Director may also conduct proficiency testing through check samples.

(iv) Evaluation of technical and operational requirements. Customs will determine whether the following technical and operational requirements are met:

(A) Equipment. The laboratory must be equipped with all of the instruments and equipment needed to conduct the tests for which it is accredited. The laboratory must ensure that all instruments and equipment are properly calibrated, checked, and maintained.

(B) Facilities. The laboratory must have, at a minimum, adequate space, lighting, and environmental controls to ensure compliance with the conditions prescribed for appropriate test procedures.

(C) Personnel. The laboratory must be staffed with persons having the necessary education, training, knowledge, and experience for their assigned functions (e.g., maintaining equipment, calibrating instruments, performing laboratory analyses, evaluating analytical results, and signing analysis reports on behalf of the laboratory). In general, each technical staff member should hold, at a minimum, a bachelor's degree in science or have two years related experience in an analytical laboratory.

(g) How will an applicant be notified concerning accreditation?—(1) Notice of accreditation or nonselection. When Customs evaluation of a laboratory's credentials is completed, the Executive Director will notify the laboratory in writing of its preliminary accreditation or nonselection. (Final accreditation determinations will not be made until the applicant has satisfied all bond requirements and made payment on all assessed charges and the balance of the applicable accreditation fee). All final notices of accreditation, reaccreditation, or extension of existing Customs accreditation will be published in the Federal Register and Customs Bulletin.

(2) Grounds for nonselection. The Executive Director may deny a laboratory's application for any of the following reasons:

(i) The application contains false or misleading information concerning a material fact;

(ii) The laboratory, a principal of the laboratory, or a person the Executive Director determines is exercising substantial ownership or control over the laboratory operation is indicted for, convicted of, or has committed acts which would:

(A) Under United States federal or state law, constitute a felony or misdemeanor involving misstatements, fraud, or a theft-related offense; or

(B) Reflect adversely on the business integrity of the applicant;

(iii) A determination is made that the laboratory-applicant does not possess the technical capability, have adequate facilities, or management to perform the approved methods of analysis for Customs purposes;

(iv) A determination is made that the laboratory has submitted false reports or statements concerning the sampling of merchandise, or that the applicant was subject to sanctions by state, local, or professional administrative bodies for such conduct;

(v) Nonpayment of assessed charges and the balance of the fixed accreditation fee; or

(vi) Failure to execute a bond in accordance with part 113 of this chapter.

(3) Adverse accreditation decisions; appeal procedures—(i) Preliminary notice. A laboratory which is not selected for accreditation will be sent a preliminary notice of nonselection. The preliminary notice of nonselection will state the specific grounds for the proposed nonselection decision and advise the laboratory that it may file a response addressing the grounds for the action proposed with the Executive Director within 30 calendar days of the date the preliminary notice of nonselection was received by the laboratory.

(ii) Final notice—(A) Based on nonresponse. If the laboratory does not respond to the preliminary notice, the Executive Director will issue a final notice of nonselection within 60 calendar days of the date the preliminary notice of nonselection was received by the laboratory applicant. The final notice of nonselection will state the specific grounds for the nonselection and advise the laboratory that it may choose to pursue one of the following two options:

(1) Submit a new application for accreditation, in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (f)(1) of this section, 180 days after the date of the final notice of nonselection; or

(2) Administratively appeal the final notice of nonselection to the Assistant Commissioner within 30 calendar days of the date of the final notice of nonselection.

(B) Based on response. If the laboratory files a timely response, the Executive Director will issue a final determination regarding the laboratory's accreditation within 30 calendar days of the date the applicant's response is received by the Executive Director. If this final determination is adverse to the laboratory, then the final notice of nonselection will state the specific grounds for nonselection and advise the laboratory that it may choose to pursue one of the two options provided at paragraphs (g)(3)(ii)(A)(1) and (2) of this section.

(iii) Appeal decision. The Assistant Commissioner will issue a decision on the appeal within 30 calendar days of the date the appeal is received. If the appeal decision is adverse to the laboratory, then the decision notice will advise the laboratory that it may choose to pursue one of the following two options:

(A) Submit a new application for accreditation, in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (f)(1) of this section, 120 days after the date of the appeal decision; or

(B) File an action with the Court of International Trade, pursuant to chapter 169 of title 28, United States Code, within 60 days of the date of the appeal decision.

(h) What are the accreditation/reaccreditation fee requirements?—(1) In general. A fixed fee, representing Customs administrative overhead expense, will be assessed for each application for accreditation or reaccreditation. In addition, associated assessments, representing the actual costs associated with travel and per diem of Customs employees related to verification of application criteria and background investigations will be charged. The combination of the fixed fee and associated assessments represent reimbursement to Customs for costs related to accreditation and reaccreditation. The fixed fee will be published in the Customs Bulletin and the Federal Register. Based on a review of the actual costs associated with the program, the fixed fee may be adjusted periodically; any changes will be published in the Customs Bulletin and the Federal Register.

(i) Accreditation fees. A nonrefundable pre-payment equal to 50 percent of the fixed accreditation fee to cover preliminary processing costs must accompany each application for accreditation. Before a laboratory will be accredited, it must remit to Customs, at the address specified in the billing, within the 30 day billing period, the associated charges assessed for the accreditation and the balance of the fixed accreditation fee.

(ii) Reaccreditation fees. Before a laboratory will be reaccredited, it must submit to Customs, at the billing address specified, within the 30 day billing period the fixed reaccreditation fee.

(2) Disputes. In the event a laboratory disputes the charges assessed for travel and per diem costs associated with scheduled inspection visits, it may file an appeal within 30 calendar days of the date of the assessment with the Executive Director. The appeal letter must specify which charges are in dispute and provide such supporting documentation as may be available for each allegation. The Executive Director will make findings of fact concerning the merits of an appeal and communicate the agency decision to the laboratory in writing within 30 calendar days of the date of the appeal.

(i) Can existing Customs-accredited laboratories continue to operate? Commercial laboratories accredited by the Executive Director prior to December 8, 1993, will retain that accreditation under these regulations provided they conduct their business in a manner consistent with the administrative portions of this section. This paragraph does not pertain to any laboratory which has had its accreditation suspended or revoked. Laboratories which have had their accreditations continued under this section will have their status reevaluated on their next triennial inspection date which is no earlier than three years after the effective date of this regulation. At the time of reaccreditation, these laboratories must meet the requirements of this section and remit to Customs, at the address specified in the billing, within the 30 day billing period, the fixed reaccreditation fee. Failure to meet these requirements will result in revocation or suspension of the accreditation.

(j) How will Customs-accredited laboratories operate?—(1) Samples for testing. Upon request by the importer of record of merchandise, the port director will release a representative sample of the merchandise for testing by a Customs-accredited laboratory at the expense of the importer. Under Customs supervision, the sample will be split into two essentially equal parts and given to the Customs-accredited laboratory. One portion of the sample may be used by the Customs-accredited laboratory for its testing. The other portion must be retained by the laboratory, under appropriate storage conditions, for Customs use, as necessary, unless Customs requires other specific procedures. Upon request, the sample portion reserved for Customs purposes must be surrendered to Customs.

(i) Retention of non-perishable samples. Non-perishable samples reserved for Customs and sample remnants from any testing must be retained by the accredited laboratory for a period of four months from the date of the laboratory's final analysis report, unless other instructions are issued in writing by Customs. At the end of this retention time period, the accredited laboratory may dispose of the retained samples and sample remnants in a manner consistent with federal, state, and local statutes.

(ii) Retention of perishable samples. Perishable samples reserved for Customs and sample remnants from any testing can be disposed of more expeditiously than provided for at paragraph (j)(1)(i) of this section, if done in accordance with acceptable laboratory procedures, unless other instructions are issued in writing by Customs.

(2) Reports—(i) Contents of reports. Testing data must be obtained using methods approved by the Executive Director. The testing results from a Customs-accredited laboratory that are submitted by an importer of record with respect to merchandise in an entry, in the absence of testing conducted by Customs laboratories, will be accepted by Customs, provided that the importer of record certifies that the sample tested was taken from the merchandise in the entry and the report establishes elements relating to the admissibility, quantity, composition, or characteristics of the merchandise entered, as required by law.

(ii) Status of commercial reports where Customs also tests merchandise. Nothing in these regulations will preclude Customs from sampling and testing merchandise from a shipment which has been sampled and tested by a Customs-accredited laboratory at the request of an importer. In cases where a shipment has been analyzed by both Customs and a Customs-accredited laboratory, all Customs actions will be based upon the analysis provided by the Customs laboratory, unless the Executive Director advises otherwise. If Customs tests merchandise, it will release the results of its test to the importer of record or its agent upon request unless the testing information is proprietary to the holder of a copyright or patent, or developed by Customs for enforcement purposes.

(3) Recordkeeping requirements. Customs-accredited laboratories must maintain records of the type normally kept in the ordinary course of business in accordance with the provisions of this chapter and any other applicable provision of law, and make them available during normal business hours for Customs inspection. In addition, these laboratories must maintain all records necessary to permit the evaluation and verification of all Customs-related work, including, as appropriate, those described below. All records must be maintained for five years, unless the laboratory is notified in writing by Customs that a longer retention time is necessary for particular records. Electronic data storage and transmission may be approved by Customs.

(i) Sample records. Records for each sample tested for Customs purposes must be readily accessible and contain the following information:

(A) A unique identifying number;

(B) The date when the sample was received or taken;

(C) The identity of the commodity (e.g., crude oil);

(D) The name of the client;

(E) The source of the sample (e.g., name of vessel, flight number of airline, name of individual taking the sample); and

(F) If available, the Customs entry date, entry number, and port of entry and the names of the importer, exporter, manufacturer, and country-of-origin.

(ii) Major equipment records. Records for each major piece of equipment or instrument (including analytical balances) used in Customs-related work must identify the name and type of instrument, the manufacturer's name, the instrument's model and any serial numbers, and the occurrence of all servicing performed on the equipment or instrument, to include recalibration and any repair work, identifying who performed the service and when.

(iii) Records of analytical procedures. The Customs-accredited laboratory must maintain complete and up-to-date copies of all approved analytical procedures, calibration methods, etc., and must document the procedures each staff member is authorized to perform. These procedures must be readily available to appropriate staff.

(iv) Laboratory analysis records. The Customs-accredited laboratory must identify each analysis by sample record number (see paragraph (j)(3)(i) of this section) and must maintain all information or data (such as sample weights, temperatures, references to filed spectra, etc.) associated with each Customs-related laboratory analysis. Each analysis record must be dated and initialed or signed by the staff member(s) who did the work.

(v) Laboratory analysis reports. Each laboratory analysis report submitted to Customs must include:

(A) The name and address of the Customs-accredited laboratory;

(B) A description and identification of the sample, including its unique identifying number;

(C) The designations of each analysis procedure used;

(D) The analysis report itself (i.e., the pertinent characteristics of the sample);

(E) The date of the report; and

(F) The typed name and signature of the person accepting technical responsibility for the analysis report (i.e., an approved signatory).

(4) Representation of Customs-accredited status. Commercial laboratories accredited by Customs must limit statements or wording regarding their accreditation to an accurate description of the tests for the commodity group(s) for which accreditation has been obtained. Use of terms other than those appearing in the notice of accreditation (see paragraph (g) of this section) is prohibited.

(5) Subcontracting prohibited. Customs-accredited laboratories must not subcontract Customs-related analysis work to non Customs-accredited laboratories or non Customs-approved gaugers, but may subcontract to other facilities that are Customs-accredited/approved and in good standing.

(k) How can a laboratory have its accreditation suspended or revoked or be required to pay a monetary penalty?—(1) Grounds for suspension, revocation, or assessment of a monetary penalty—(i) In general. The Executive Director may immediately suspend or revoke a laboratory's accreditation only in cases where the laboratory's actions are intentional violations of any Customs law or when required by public health or safety. In other situations where the Executive Director has cause, the Executive Director will propose the suspension or revocation of a laboratory's accreditation or propose a monetary penalty and provide the laboratory with the opportunity to respond to the notice of proposed action.

(ii) Specific grounds. A laboratory's accreditation may be suspended or revoked, or a monetary penalty may be assessed because:

(A) The selection was obtained through fraud or the misstatement of a material fact by the laboratory;

(B) The laboratory, a principal of the laboratory, or a person the port director determines is exercising substantial ownership or control over the laboratory operation is indicted for, convicted of, or has committed acts which would: under United States federal or state law, constitute a felony or misdemeanor involving misstatements, fraud, or a theft-related offense; or reflect adversely on the business integrity of the applicant. In the absence of an indictment, conviction, or other legal process, the port director must have probable cause to believe the proscribed acts occurred;

(C) Staff laboratory personnel refuse or otherwise fail to follow any proper order of a Customs officer or any Customs order, rule, or regulation;

(D) The laboratory fails to operate in accordance with the obligations of paragraph (c) of this section;

(E) A determination is made that the laboratory is no longer technically or operationally proficient at performing the approved methods of analysis for Customs purposes;

(F) The laboratory fails to remit to Customs, at the billing address specified, within the 30 day billing period the associated charges assessed for the accreditation and the balance of the fixed accreditation fee;

(G) The laboratory fails to maintain its bond;

(H) The laboratory fails to remit to Customs, at the billing address specified, within the 30 day billing period, the fixed reaccreditation fee; or

(I) The laboratory fails to remit any monetary penalty assessed under this section.

(iii) Assessment of monetary penalties. The assessment of a monetary penalty under this section, may be in lieu of, or in addition to, a suspension or revocation of accreditation under this section. The monetary penalty may not exceed $100,000 per violation and will be assessed and administered pursuant to published guidelines. Any monetary penalty under this section can be in addition to the recovery of:

(A) Any loss of revenue, in cases where the laboratory intentionally falsified the analysis report in collusion with the importer, pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 1499(b)(1)(B)(i); or

(B) Liquidated damages assessed under the laboratory's Customs bond.

(2) Notice of adverse action. When a decision to suspend or revoke accreditation, and/or assess a monetary penalty is made, the Executive Director will immediately notify the laboratory in writing, indicating whether the action is effective immediately or is proposed.

(i) Immediate suspension or revocation. Where the suspension or revocation of accreditation is immediate, the Executive Director will issue a final notice of adverse determination. The final notice of adverse determination will state the specific grounds for the immediate suspension or revocation, direct the laboratory to cease performing any Customs-accredited functions, and advise the laboratory that it may choose to pursue one of the following two options:

(A) Submit a new application for accreditation, in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (f)(1) of this section, 180 days after the date of the final notice of adverse determination; or

(B) Administratively appeal the final notice of adverse determination to the Assistant Commissioner within 30 calendar days of the date of the final notice of adverse determination.

(ii) Proposed suspension, revocation, or assessment of monetary penalty—(A) Preliminary notice. Where the suspension or revocation of accreditation, and/or the assessment of a monetary penalty is proposed, the Executive Director will issue a preliminary notice of proposed action. The preliminary notice of proposed action will state the specific grounds for the proposed action, inform the laboratory that it may continue to perform those functions requiring Customs-accreditation until the Executive Director's final notice is issued, and advise the laboratory that it may file a response addressing the grounds for the action proposed with the Executive Director within 30 calendar days of the date the preliminary notice of proposed action was received by the laboratory. The laboratory may respond by accepting responsibility, explaining extenuating circumstances, and/or providing rebuttal evidence. The laboratory also may ask for a meeting with the Executive Director or his designee to discuss the proposed action.

(B) Final notice—(1) Based on nonresponse. If the laboratory does not respond to the preliminary notice of proposed action, the Executive Director will issue a final notice of adverse determination within 60 calendar days of the date the preliminary notice of proposed action was received by the laboratory. The final notice of adverse determination will state the specific grounds for the adverse determination, direct the laboratory to cease performing any Customs-accredited functions, and advise the laboratory that it may choose to pursue one of the two options provided at paragraphs (k)(2)(i)(A) and (B) of this section.

(2) Based on response. If the laboratory files a timely response, the Executive Director will issue a final determination regarding the status of the laboratory's accreditation within 30 calendar days of the date the laboratory's response is received by the Executive Director. If this final determination is adverse to the laboratory, then the final notice of adverse determination will state the specific grounds for the adverse action, advise the laboratory to cease performing any functions requiring Customs accreditation, and advise the laboratory that it may choose to pursue one of the two options provided at paragraphs (k)(2)(i)(A) and (B) of this section.

(3) Publication of final notices of adverse determination. Any final notices of adverse determination issued by the Executive Director resulting in a laboratory being directed to cease performing Customs-accredited functions will be published in the Federal Register and Customs Bulletin and the notice published will include the effective date, duration, and scope of the determination.

(4) Appeal decision. The Assistant Commissioner will issue a decision on the appeal within 30 calendar days of the date the appeal is received. If the appeal decision is adverse to the laboratory, then the decision notice will advise the laboratory that it may choose to pursue one of the following two options:

(i) Submit a new application for accreditation, in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (f)(1) of this section, 120 days after the date of the appeal decision; or

(ii) File an action with the Court of International Trade, pursuant to chapter 169 of title 28, United States Code, within 60 days of the date of the appeal decision.

[T.D. 99-67, 64 FR 48534, Sept. 7, 1999; T.D. 99-67, 65 FR 10009, 10010, Feb. 25, 2000]

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§151.13   Approval of commercial gaugers.

This section sets forth the requirements for commercial gaugers to obtain approval by Customs for the measuring of certain merchandise, and explains the operation of such approved gaugers. This section also provides for the imposition of approval and reapproval fees, sets forth grounds for the suspension or revocation of approval, and provides for the imposition of a monetary penalty for an approved commercial gauger that fails to adhere to the provisions of this section.

(a) What is a “Customs-approved gauger”? “Commercial gaugers” are individuals and commercial organizations that measure, gauge, or sample merchandise (usually merchandise in bulk form) and who deal mainly with animal and vegetable oils, petroleum, petroleum products, and bulk chemicals. A “Customs-approved gauger” is a commercial concern, within the United States, that has demonstrated, to the satisfaction of the Executive Director (defined at §151.12(a)), pursuant to this section, the capability to perform certain gauging and measurement procedures for certain commodities. Customs approval extends only to the performance of such functions as are vested in, or delegated to, Customs.

(b) What are the obligations of a Customs-approved gauger? A commercial gauger approved by Customs agrees to the following conditions and requirements:

(1) To comply with the requirements of part 151, Customs Regulations (19 CFR part 151), and to conduct professional services in conformance with approved standards and procedures, including procedures which may be required by the Commissioner of Customs or the Executive Director;

(2) To have no interest in or other connection with any business or other activity which might affect the unbiased performance of duties as a Customs-approved gauger. It is understood that this does not prohibit acceptance of the usual fees for professional services;

(3) To maintain the ability, i.e., the instrumentation, equipment, qualified staff, facilities, etc., to perform the services for which the gauger is approved, and allow the Executive Director to evaluate that ability on a periodic basis by such means as on-site inspections, demonstrations of gauging procedures, and reviews of submitted records;

(4) To retain those gauger records beyond the five-year record-retention period specified by Customs as necessary to address matters concerned in pending litigation, and, if gauger operations or approval cease, to contact Customs immediately regarding the disposition of records retained;

(5) To promptly investigate any circumstance which might affect the accuracy of work performed as an approved gauger, to correct the situation immediately, and to notify the port director, the Executive Director, and the Center director of such matters, their consequences, and any corrective action taken or that needs to be taken; and

(6) To immediately notify the port director, the Executive Director, and the Center director of any attempt to impede, influence, or coerce gauger personnel in the performance of their duties, or of any decision to terminate gauger operations or approval status. Further, within 5 days of any changes involving legal name, address, ownership, parent-subsidiary relationships, bond, other offices or sites, or approved signatories to notify the Executive Director by certified mail.

(c) What are the approved measurement procedures? Customs-approved gaugers must comply with appropriate procedures published by such professional organizations as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the American Petroleum Institute (API), unless the Executive Director gives written permission to use an alternate method. Alternative methods will be considered and approved on a case-by-case basis.

(d) How would a commercial gauger become a Customs-approved gauger?—(1) What should an application contain? An application for Customs approval must contain the following information:

(i) The applicant's legal name and the address of its principal place of business and any other facility out of which it will work;

(ii) Detailed statements of ownership and any partnerships, parent-subsidiary relationships, or affiliations with any other domestic or foreign organizations, including, but not limited to, importers, producers, refiners, Customs brokers, or carriers;

(iii) A statement of financial condition;

(iv) If a corporation, a copy of the articles of incorporation and the names of all officers and directors;

(v) The names, titles, and qualifications of each person who will be authorized to sign or approve gauging reports on behalf of the commercial gauger;

(vi) A complete description of the applicant's facilities, instruments, and equipment;

(vii) An express agreement that if notified by Customs of pending approval to execute a bond in accordance with part 113, Customs Regulations (19 CFR part 113), and submit it to the Customs port nearest to the applicant's main office. (The limits of liability on the bond will be established by the Customs port in consultation with the Executive Director. In order to retain Customs approval, the gauger must maintain an adequate bond, as determined by the port director);

(viii) An express agreement to be bound by the obligations contained in paragraph (b) of this section; and,

(ix) A nonrefundable pre-payment equal to 50 percent of the fixed approval fee, as published in the Federal Register and Customs Bulletin, to cover preliminary processing costs. Further, the applicant agrees to pay Customs within 30 days of notification of preliminary approval the associated charges assessed for approval, i.e., those charges for actual travel and background investigation costs, and the balance of the fixed approval fee.

(2) Where should an application be sent? A commercial gauger seeking approval or an extension of an existing approval must send a letter of application to the U.S. Customs Service, Attention: Executive Director, Laboratories & Scientific Services, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, D.C. 20229.

(3) How will an application be reviewed?—(i) Determination of competence. The Executive Director will determine the applicant's overall competence, independence, and character by conducting on-site inspections, which may include demonstrations by the applicant of gauging procedures and a review of records submitted, and background investigations. The Executive Director may also conduct proficiency testing through check samples.

(ii) Evaluation of technical and operational requirements. Customs will determine whether the following technical and operational requirements are met:

(A) Equipment. The facility must be equipped with all of the instruments and equipment needed to conduct approved services. The gauger must ensure that all instruments and equipment are properly calibrated, checked, and maintained.

(B) Facilities. The facility must have, at a minimum, adequate space, lighting, and environmental controls to ensure compliance with the conditions prescribed for appropriate measurements.

(C) Personnel. The facility must be staffed with persons having the necessary education, training, knowledge, and experience for their assigned functions (e.g., maintaining equipment, calibrating instruments, performing gauging services, evaluating gauging results, and signing gauging reports on behalf of the commercial gauger). In general, each technical staff member should have, at a minimum, six months training and experience in gauging.

(e) How will an applicant be notified concerning approval?—(1) Notice of approval or nonselection. When Customs evaluation of a gauger's credentials is completed, the Executive Director will notify the gauger in writing of its preliminary approval or nonselection. (Final approval determinations will not be made until the applicant has satisfied all bond requirements and made payment on all assessed charges and the balance of the applicable approval fee). All final notices of approval, reapproval, or extension of existing Customs approval will be published in the Federal Register and Customs Bulletin.

(2) Grounds for nonselection. The Executive Director may deny a gauger's application for any of the following reasons:

(i) The application contains false or misleading information concerning a material fact;

(ii) The gauger, a principal of the gauging facility, or a person the Executive Director determines is exercising substantial ownership or control over the gauger operation is indicted for, convicted of, or has committed acts which would:

(A) Under United States federal or state law, constitute a felony or misdemeanor involving misstatements, fraud, or a theft-related offense; or

(B) Reflect adversely on the business integrity of the applicant;

(iii) A determination is made that the gauger-applicant does not possess the technical capability, have adequate facilities, or management to perform the approved methods of measurement for Customs purposes;

(iv) A determination is made that the gauger has submitted false reports or statements concerning the measurement of merchandise, or that the applicant was subject to sanctions by state, local, or professional administrative bodies for such conduct;

(v) Nonpayment of assessed charges and the balance of the fixed approval fee; or

(vi) Failure to execute a bond in accordance with part 113 of this chapter.

(3) Adverse approval decisions; appeal procedures.   (i) Preliminary notice. A gauger which is not selected for approval will be sent a preliminary notice of nonselection. The preliminary notice of nonselection will state the specific grounds for the proposed nonselection decision and advise the gauger that it may file a response addressing the grounds for the action proposed with the Executive Director within 30 calendar days of the date the preliminary notice of nonselection was received by the gauger.

(ii) Final notice—(A) Based on nonresponse. If the gauger does not respond to the preliminary notice, the Executive Director will issue a final notice of nonselection within 60 calendar days of the date the preliminary notice of nonselection was received by the gauger applicant. The final notice of nonselection will state the specific grounds for the nonselection and advise the gauger that it may choose to pursue one of the following two options:

(1) Submit a new application for approval, in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d)(1) of this section, 180 days after the date of the final notice of nonselection; or

(2) Administratively appeal the final notice of nonselection to the Assistant Commissioner within 30 calendar days of the date of the final notice of nonselection.

(B) Based on response. If the gauger files a timely response, the Executive Director will issue a final determination regarding the gauger's approval within 30 calendar days of the date the applicant's response is received by the Executive Director. If this final determination is adverse to the gauger, then the final notice of nonselection will state the specific grounds for nonselection and advise the gauger that it may choose to pursue one of the two options provided at paragraphs (e)(3)(ii)(A)(1) and (2) of this section.

(iii) Appeal decision. The Assistant Commissioner will issue a decision on the appeal within 30 calendar days of the date the appeal is received. If the appeal decision is adverse to the gauger, then the decision notice will advise the gauger that it may choose to pursue one of the following two options:

(A) Submit a new application for approval, in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d)(1) of this section, 120 days after the date of the appeal decision; or

(B) File an action with the Court of International Trade, pursuant to chapter 169 of title 28, United States Code, within 60 days of the date of the appeal decision.

(f) What are the approval/reapproval fee requirements?—(1) In general. A fixed fee, representing Customs administrative overhead expense, will be assessed for each application for approval or reapproval. In addition, associated assessments, representing the actual costs associated with travel and per diem of Customs employees related to verification of application criteria and background investigations will be charged. The combination of the fixed fee and associated assessments represent reimbursement to Customs for costs related to approval and reapproval. The fixed fee will be published in the Customs Bulletin and the Federal Register. Based on a review of the actual costs associated with the program, the fixed fee may be adjusted periodically; any changes will be published in the Customs Bulletin and the Federal Register.

(i) Approval fees. A nonrefundable pre-payment equal to 50 percent of the fixed approval fee to cover preliminary processing costs must accompany each application for approval. Before a gauger will be approved, it must submit to Customs, at the address specified in the billing, within the 30 day billing period the associated charges assessed for the approval and the balance of the fixed approval fee.

(ii) Reapproval fees. Before a gauger will be reapproved, it must submit to Customs, at the billing address specified, within the 30 day billing period, the fixed reapproval fee.

(2) Disputes. In the event a gauger disputes the charges assessed for travel and per diem costs associated with scheduled inspection visits, it may file an appeal within 30 calendar days of the date of the assessment with the Executive Director. The appeal letter must specify which charges are in dispute and provide such supporting documentation as may be available for each allegation. The Executive Director will make findings of fact concerning the merits of an appeal and communicate the agency decision to the gauger in writing within 30 calendar days of the date of the appeal.

(g) Can existing Customs-approved gaugers continue to operate? Commercial gaugers approved by the Executive Director prior to December 8, 1993, will retain approval under these regulations provided that they conduct their business in a manner consistent with the administrative portions of this section. This paragraph does not pertain to any gauger which has had its approval suspended or revoked. Gaugers which have had their approvals continued under this section will have their status reevaluated on their next triennial inspection date which is no earlier than three years after the effective date of this regulation. At the time of reapproval, these gaugers must meet the requirements of this section and remit to Customs, at the address specified in the billing, within the 30 day billing period the fixed reapproval fee. Failure to meet these requirements will result in revocation or suspension of the approval.

(h) How will Customs-approved gaugers operate?—(1) Reports—(i) Contents of reports. The measurement results from a Customs-approved gauger that are submitted by an importer of record with respect to merchandise in an entry, in the absence of measurements conducted by Customs, will be accepted by Customs, provided that the importer of record certifies that the measurement was of the merchandise in the entry. All reports must measure net landed quantity, except in the case of crude petroleum of Heading 2709, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS), which may be measured by gross quantity. Reports must use the appropriate HTSUS units of quantity, e.g., liters, barrels, or kilograms.

HTSUSProductUnit of quantity
Headings 1501-1515Animal and vegetable oilsKilogram.
Subheadings 2707.10-2707.30 and 2902.20-2902.44Benzene, toluene and xyleneLiter.
Heading 2709Crude PetroleumBarrel.
Heading 2710 (various subheadings)Fuel oils, motor oils, kerosene, naphtha, lubricating oilsBarrel.
Chapter 29 (various subheadings)Organic compounds in bulk and liquid formKilogram, liter, etc.

(ii) Status of commercial reports where Customs also gauges merchandise. Nothing in these regulations will preclude Customs from gauging a shipment which has been gauged by a Customs-approved gauger at the request of an importer. In cases where a shipment has been gauged by both Customs and a Customs-approved gauger, all Customs actions will be based upon the gauging reports issued by Customs, unless the Executive Director advises other actions. If Customs gauges merchandise, it will release the report of its measurements to the importer of record or its agent upon request unless the gauging information is proprietary to the holder of a copyright or patent, or developed by Customs for enforcement purposes.

(2) Recordkeeping requirements. Customs-approved gaugers must maintain records of the type normally kept in the ordinary course of business in accordance with the provisions of this chapter and any other applicable provisions of law, and make them available during normal business hours for Customs inspection. In addition, these gaugers must maintain all records necessary to permit the evaluation and verification of all Customs-related work, including, as appropriate, those described below. All records must be maintained for five years, unless the gauger is notified in writing by Customs that a longer retention time is necessary for particular records. Electronic data storage and transmission may be approved by Customs.

(i) Transaction records. Records for each Customs-related transaction must be readily accessible and have the following:

(A) A unique identifying number;

(B) The date and location where the transaction occurred;

(C) The identity of the product (e.g., crude oil);

(D) The name of the client;

(E) The source of the product (e.g., name of vessel, flight number of airline); and

(F) If available, the Customs entry date, entry number, and port of entry and the names of the importer, exporter, manufacturer, and country-of-origin.

(ii) Major equipment records. Records for each major piece of equipment used in Customs-related work must identify the name and type of instrument, the manufacturer's name, the instrument's model and any serial numbers, and the occurrence of all servicing performed on the equipment or instrument, to include recalibration and any repair work, identifying who performed the service and when.

(iii) Records of gauging procedures. The Customs-approved gauger must maintain complete and up-to-date copies of all approved gauging procedures, calibration methods, etc., and must document the procedures that each staff member is authorized to perform. These procedures must be readily available to appropriate staff.

(iv) Gauging records. The Customs-approved gauger must identify each transaction by transaction record number (see paragraph (h)(2)(i) of this section) and must maintain all information or data (such as temperatures, etc.) associated with each Customs-related gauging transaction. Each gauging record (i.e., the complete file of all data for each separate transaction) must be dated and initialed or signed by the staff member(s) who did the work.

(v) Gauging reports. Each gauging report submitted to Customs must include:

(A) The name and address of the Customs-approved gauger;

(B) A description and identification of the transaction, including its unique identifying number;

(C) The designations of each gauging procedure used;

(D) The gauging report itself (i.e., the quantity of the merchandise);

(E) The date of the report; and

(F) The typed name and signature of the person accepting technical responsibility for the gauging report (i.e., an approved signatory).

(3) Representation of Customs-approved status. Commercial gaugers approved by Customs must limit statements or wording regarding their approval to an accurate description of the commodities for which approval has been obtained. Use of terms other than those appearing in the notice of approval (see paragraph (e) of this section) is prohibited.

(4) Subcontracting prohibited. Customs-approved gaugers must not subcontract Customs-related work to non Customs-approved gaugers or non Customs-accredited laboratories, but may subcontract to other facilities that are Customs-approved/accredited and in good standing.

(i) How can a gauger have its approval suspended or revoked or be required to pay a monetary penalty?—(1) Grounds for suspension, revocation, or assessment of a monetary penalty—(i) In general. The Executive Director may immediately suspend or revoke a gauger's approval only in cases where the gauger's actions are intentional violations of any Customs law or when required by public health or safety. In other situations where the Executive Director has cause, the Executive Director will propose the suspension or revocation of a gauger's approval or propose a monetary penalty and provide the gauger with the opportunity to respond to the notice of proposed action.

(ii) Specific grounds. A gauger's approval may be suspended or revoked, or a monetary penalty may be assessed because:

(A) The selection was obtained through fraud or the misstatement of a material fact by the gauger;

(B) The gauger, a principal of the gauging facility, or a person the port director determines is exercising substantial ownership or control over the gauger operation is indicted for, convicted of, or has committed acts which would: under United States federal or state law, constitute a felony or misdemeanor involving misstatements, fraud, or a theft-related offense; or reflect adversely on the business integrity of the applicant. In the absence of an indictment, conviction, or other legal process, the port director must have probable cause to believe the proscribed acts occurred;

(C) Staff gauger personnel refuse or otherwise fail to follow any proper order of a Customs officer or any Customs order, rule, or regulation;

(D) The gauger fails to operate in accordance with the obligations of paragraph (b) of this section;

(E) A determination is made that the gauger is no longer technically or operationally proficient at performing the approved methods of measurement for Customs purposes;

(F) The gauger fails to remit to Customs, at the billing address specified, within the 30 day billing period the associated charges assessed for the approval and the balance of the fixed approval fee;

(G) The gauger fails to maintain its bond;

(H) The gauger fails to remit to Customs, at the billing address specified, within the 30 day billing period the fixed reapproval fee; or

(I) The gauger fails to remit any monetary penalty assessed under this section.

(iii) Assessment of monetary penalties. The assessment of a monetary penalty under this section, may be in lieu of, or in addition to, a suspension or revocation of approval under this section. The monetary penalty may not exceed $100,000 per violation and will be assessed and administered pursuant to published guidelines. Any monetary penalty under this section can be in addition to the recovery of:

(A) Any loss of revenue, in cases where the gauger intentionally falsified the gauging report in collusion with the importer, pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 1499(b)(1)(B)(i); or

(B) Liquidated damages assessed under the gauger's Customs bond.

(2) Notice of adverse action. When a decision to suspend or revoke approval, and/or assess a monetary penalty is made, the Executive Director will immediately notify the gauger in writing, indicating whether the action is effective immediately or is proposed.

(i) Immediate suspension or revocation. Where the suspension or revocation of approval is immediate, the Executive Director will issue a final notice of adverse determination. The final notice of adverse determination will state the specific grounds for the immediate suspension or revocation, direct the gauger to cease performing any Customs-approved functions, and advise the gauger that it may choose to pursue one of the following two options:

(A) Submit a new application for approval, in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d)(1) of this section, 180 days after the date of the final notice of nonselection; or

(B) Administratively appeal the final notice of adverse determination to the Assistant Commissioner within 30 calendar days of the date of the final notice of adverse determination.

(ii) Proposed suspension, revocation, or assessment of monetary penalty—(A) Preliminary notice. Where the suspension or revocation of approval, and/or the assessment of a monetary penalty is proposed, the Executive Director will issue a preliminary notice of proposed action. The preliminary notice of proposed action will state the specific grounds for the proposed action, inform the gauger that it may continue to perform those functions requiring Customs-approval until the Executive Director's final notice is issued, and advise the gauger that it may file a response addressing the grounds for the action proposed with the Executive Director within 30 calendar days of the date the preliminary notice of proposed action was received by the gauger. The gauger may respond by accepting responsibility, explaining extenuating circumstances, and/or providing rebuttal evidence. The gauger also may ask for a meeting with the Executive Director or his designee to discuss the proposed action.

(B) Final notice—(1) Based on nonresponse. If the gauger does not respond to the preliminary notice of proposed action, the Executive Director will issue a final notice of adverse determination within 60 calendar days of the date the preliminary notice of proposed action was received by the gauger. The final notice of adverse determination will state the specific grounds for the adverse determination, direct the gauger to cease performing any Customs-approved functions, and advise the gauger that it may choose to pursue one of the two options provided at paragraphs (i)(2)(i)(A) and (B) of this section.

(2) Based on response. If the gauger files a timely response, the Executive Director will issue a final determination regarding the status of the gauger's approval within 30 calendar days of the date the gauger's response is received by the Executive Director. If this final determination is adverse to the gauger, then the final notice of adverse determination will state the specific grounds for the adverse action, advise the gauger to cease performing any functions requiring Customs approval, and advise the gauger that it may choose to pursue one of the two options provided at paragraphs (i)(2)(i))(A) and (B) of this section.

(3) Publication of final notices of adverse determination. Any final notices of adverse determination issued by the Executive Director resulting in a gauger being directed to cease performing Customs-approved functions will be published in the Federal Register and Customs Bulletin and the notice published will include the effective date, duration, and scope of the determination.

(4) Appeal decision. The Assistant Commissioner will issue a decision on the appeal within 30 calendar days of the date the appeal is received. If the appeal decision is adverse to the gauger, then the decision notice will advise the gauger that it may choose to pursue one of the following two options:

(i) Submit a new application for approval, in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (d)(1) of this section, 120 days after the date of the appeal decision; or

(ii) File an action with the Court of International Trade, pursuant to chapter 169 of title 28, United States Code, within 60 calendar days of the date of the appeal decision.

[T.D. 99-67, 64 FR 48539, Sept. 7, 1999; 65 FR 10011, Feb. 25, 2000]

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§151.14   Use of commercial laboratory tests in liquidation.

The analysis method for crude petroleum contained in ASTM D96 or other approved analysis method and as determined by a Customs-accredited commercial laboratory shall be used for Customs purposes if the difference between the value found by the commercial laboratory and the value found by the Customs laboratory does not exceed 0.11 percent. If the difference exceeds this limit and the Customs-accredited commercial laboratory cannot establish that Customs is in error, then the Customs results shall be used.

[T.D. 90-78, 55 FR 40167, Oct. 2, 1990, as amended by T.D. 99-67, 64 FR 48543, Sept. 7, 1999]

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§151.15   Movement of merchandise to a centralized examination station.

(a) Permission to transfer merchandise for examination. When a shipment requires examination at a centralized examination station (CES), Customs Form 3461, or Customs Form 3461 (ALT), or their electronic equivalents, for land border cargo, or an attachment to either, may be used to request permission to transfer the merchandise to a CES. The entry filer must write, type or stamp the following lines on the form or attachment, and must supply the information called for on the first three lines:

Containers to be transferred: ___ All or,

Container #'s ___, ___, ___

To CES_________________

Approved by: U.S. Customs Inspector___

Date_________________

Unless the port director exercises his authority pursuant to paragraph (d) of this section, the reviewing inspector will initial and date the form or attachment being used, or stamp one copy of the Customs Form 3461 or 3461 (ALT), or their electronic equivalents if required by the port director. A copy of this document will act as notification and authorization to the entry filer that the merchandise must be transferred to the importer-designated CES unless another CES is designated by the port director under paragraph (d) of this section.

(b) Assumption of liability during transfer. Merchandise designated for examination may be transferred from the importing carrier's point of unlading or from a bonded facility, to a CES, only if the transfer takes place under bond. The entry filer shall select one of the following bonded movements for the transfer to the CES unless the type of bonded movement to be used is specified by the port director under paragraph (d) of this section:

(1) If the merchandise is tranferred directly to a CES by an importing carrier, the importing carrier shall remain liable under the terms of its international carrier bond for the proper safekeeping and delivery of the merchandise until it is receipted for by the CES operator.

(2) If the merchandise is transferred directly from a bonded carrier's facility to a CES or is delivered directly to the CES by a bonded carrier, the bonded carrier shall remain liable under the terms of its custodial bond for the proper safekeeping and delivery of the merchandise until it is receipted for by the CES operator.

(3) If containerized cargo, including excess loose cargo that is part of the containerized cargo, is transferred to a CES operator's own facility using his own vehicles, the CES operator shall be liable under the terms of his custodial bond for the proper safekeeping and delivery of the merchandise to the CES facility.

(4) If the importer or his agent acting as importer of record transfers the merchandise to a CES, that importer or agent shall assume liability under his importation and entry bond (see §151.7(d) of this part) for the proper transfer of the merchandise until it is receipted for by the CES operator.

(c) Annual blanket transfer. Port directors may institute an annual blanket transfer application procedure to facilitate any of the bonded movements described in paragraph (b) of this section.

(d) Designation of bonded movement and CES to be used. In the event the port director deems it necessary, he may direct the type of bonded movement to be used to transfer merchandise to a CES and may designate the CES at which examination must take place. In either case the port director's action will be noted on the Customs Form 3461 or 3461 (ALT), or their electronic equivalents, or attachment thereto.

[T.D. 93-6, 58 FR 5606, Jan. 22, 1993, as amended by CBP Dec. 15-14, 80 FR 61290, Oct. 13, 2015]

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§151.16   Detention of merchandise.

(a) Exemptions from applicability. The provisions of this section are not applicable to detentions effected by CBP on behalf of other agencies of the U.S. Government in whom the determination of admissibility is vested and to detentions arising from possibly piratical copies (see part 133, subpart E, of this Chapter), goods bearing marks which are confusingly similar to recorded trademarks, or restricted gray market merchandise (see part 133, subpart C, of this chapter.)

(b) Decision to detain or release. Within the 5-day period (excluding weekends and holidays) following the date on which merchandise is presented for Customs examination, Customs shall decide whether to release or detain merchandise. Merchandise which is not released within such 5-day period shall be considered to be detained merchandise. For purposes of this section, merchandise shall be considered to be presented for Customs examination when it is in a condition to be viewed and examined by a Customs officer. Mere presentation to the examining officer of a cargo van, container or instrument of international traffic in which the merchandise to be examined is contained will not be considered to be presentation of merchandise for Customs examination for purposes of this section. Except when merchandise is examined at the public stores, the importer shall pay all costs relating to the preparation and transportation of merchandise for examination.

(c) Notice of detention. If a decision to detain merchandise is made, or the merchandise is not released within the 5-day period, Customs shall issue a notice to the importer or other party having an interest in such merchandise no later than 5 days (excluding weekends and holidays) after such decision or failure to release (see paragraph (b) of this section). Issuance of a notice of detention is not to be construed as a final determination as to admissibility of the merchandise. The notice shall be prepared by the Customs officer detaining the merchandise and shall advise the importer or other interested party of the:

(1) Initiation of the detention, including the date the merchandise was presented for examination;

(2) Specific reason for the detention;

(3) Anticipated length of the detention;

(4) Nature of the tests or inquiries to be conducted; and

(5) Nature of any information which, if supplied to the Customs Service, may accelerate the disposition of the detention.

(d) Providing testing results. Upon written request by the importer or other party having an interest in detained merchandise, Customs shall provide copies of the results of any testing conducted on the merchandise together with a description of the testing procedures and methodologies used (unless such procedures or methodologies are proprietary to the holder of a copyright or patent or were developed by Customs for enforcement purposes). The results and test description shall be in sufficient detail to permit the duplication and analysis of the testing and the results.

(e) Final determinations. A final determination with respect to admissibility of detained merchandise will be made within 30 days from the date the merchandise is presented for Customs examination. Such a determination may be the subject of a protest.

(f) Effect of failure to make a determination. The failure by Customs to make a final determination with respect to the admissibility of detained merchandise within 30 days after the merchandise has been presented for Customs examination, or such longer period if specifically authorized by law, shall be treated as a decision by Customs to exclude the merchandise for purposes of section 514(a)(4) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1514(a)(4)). Such a deemed exclusion may be the subject of a protest.

(g) Failure to decide protest. If a protest which is filed as a result of a final determination or a deemed exclusion of detained merchandise is not allowed or denied in whole or in part before the 30th day after the day on which the protest was filed, it shall be treated as having been denied on such 30th day for purposes of 28 U.S.C. 1581.

(h) Decision before commencement of court action. Customs may at any time after a deemed denial of a protest as provided in paragraph (g) of this section, but before commencement of a court action as provided in paragraph (i) of this section, grant a protest and permit release of detained merchandise, or deny a protest in accordance with §174.30 of this chapter.

(i) Commencement of court action; burden of proof and decisions of the court. Once a court action respecting a detention is commenced, unless Customs establishes by a preponderance of the evidence that an admissibility decision has not been reached for good cause, the court shall grant the appropriate relief which may include, but is not limited to, an order to cancel the detention and release the merchandise.

(j) Seizure and forfeiture; denial of entry or exportation. If otherwise provided by law, detained merchandise may be seized and forfeited. In lieu of seizure and forfeiture, where authorized by law, Customs may deny entry and permit the merchandise to be exported, with the importer responsible for paying all expenses of exportation.

[T.D. 99-65, 64 FR 43611, Aug. 11, 1999, as amended by CBP Dec. 12-10, 77 FR 24380, Apr. 24, 2012; USCBP-2012-0011, 80 FR 56381, Sept. 18, 2015]

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Subpart B—Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses

§151.21   Definitions.

The following are general definitions for the purposes of this subpart in applying the provisions of Chapters 17 and 18, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202):

(a) Degree. “Degree” or “sugar degree” means an International Sugar Degree as determined by polarimetric test performed in accordance with procedures recognized by the International Commission for Uniform Methods of Sugar Analysis. This test discloses the percentage of sucrose contained in the sugar.

(b) Total sugars. “Total sugars” means the sum of the sucrose, the raffinose, and the reducing sugars.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51268, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.22   Estimated duties on raw sugar.

Estimated duties shall be taken on raw sugar, as defined in Subheading Note 1 to Chapter 17, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States, on the basis of not less than 96° polariscopic test unless the invoice shows that the sugar is of a lower grade than that of the ordinary commercial shipment.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51268, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.23   Allowance for moisture in raw sugar.

Inasmuch as the absorption of sea water or moisture reduces the polariscopic test of sugar, there shall be no allowance on account of increased weight of raw sugar importations due to unusual absorption of sea water or other moisture while on the voyage of importation. Any portion of the cargo claimed by the importer to have absorbed sea water or moisture on the voyage of importation shall be weighed, sampled, and tested separately. No such claim shall be considered if made after the sugar claimed to have been damaged has been weighed.

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§151.24   Unlading facilities for bulk sugar.

When dutiable sugar is to be imported in bulk, a full description of the facilities to be used in unlading the sugar shall be submitted to the Commissioner of Customs as far as possible in advance of the date of importation, and special instructions will be issued as to the methods to be applied in weighing and sampling such sugar.

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§151.25   Mixing classes of sugar.

No regulations relative to the weighing, taring, sampling, classifying, and testing of imported sugar shall be so construed as to permit mixing together sugar of different classes, such as centrifugal, beet, molasses, or any sugar different in character from those mentioned, for the purpose of weighing, taring, sampling, or testing.

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§151.26   Molasses in tank cars.

When molasses is imported in tank cars, the importer shall file with the port director a certificate showing whether there is any substantial difference either in the total sugars or the character of the molasses in the different cars.

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§151.27   Weighing and sampling done at time of unlading.

Sugar, sirup, and molasses requiring either weighing or sampling shall be weighed or sampled at the time of unlading. When such merchandise requires both weighing and sampling, these operations shall be performed simultaneously.

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§151.28   Gauging of sirup or molasses discharged into storage tanks.

(a) Plans of storage tank to be filed. When sirup or molasses is imported in bulk in tank vessels and is to be pumped or discharged into storage tanks, before the discharging is permitted there shall be filed with the port director a certified copy of the plans and gauge table of the storage tank showing all inlets and outlets and stating accurately the capacity in liters per centimeter of height of the tank from an indicated starting point.

(b) Settling before gauging. After the discharge is completed, all inlets to the tank shall be carefully sealed and the sirup or molasses left undisturbed for a period not to exceed 20 days to allow for settling before being gauged. When a request for immediate gauging is made in writing by the importer, it shall be allowed by the port director.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 80-142, 45 FR 36384, May 30, 1980; T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51268, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.29   Expense of unlading and handling.

No expense incidental to the unlading, transporting, or handling of sugar, sirup, or molasses for convenient weighing, gaging, measuring, sampling, or marking shall be borne by the Government.

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§151.30   Sugar closets.

Sugar closets for samples shall be substantially built and secured by locks furnished by Customs. They shall be conveniently located as near as possible to the points of discharge they are intended to serve. They shall be provided by the owner of the premises on which they are located and shall be so situated that sugar, sirup, and molasses stored therein shall not be subjected to extremes of temperature or humidity.

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§151.31   [Reserved]

Subpart C—Petroleum and Petroleum Products

§151.41   Information on entry summary.

On the entry summary for petroleum or petroleum products in bulk, the importer shall show the API gravity at 60 °Fahrenheit, in accordance with the current edition of the ASTM-IP Petroleum Measurement Tables (American Edition), approved by the American Society for Testing and Materials. The appropriate unabridged table shall be used in the reduction of volume to 60 °F. If the exact volumetric quantity cannot be determined in advance, the entry summary may be made for “_ barrels, more or less”, but in no case may the estimate vary by more than three percent from the gross quantity unladen. The term “barrels” is defined in Chapter 27, Additional U.S. Note 7, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States. The information required by this section also shall be shown on the entry summary permit if the entry summary is filed at the time of entry, and on each entry summary continuation sheet regardless of when the entry summary is filed.

[T.D. 80-142, 45 FR 36384, May 30, 1980, as amended by T.D. 82-224, 47 FR 53728, Nov. 29, 1982; T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51268, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.42   Controls on unlading and gauging.

(a) Methods of control. (1) Each port director shall establish controls and checks on the unlading and measurement of petroleum and petroleum products imported in bulk by vessel, truck, railroad car, pipeline, or other carrier. One of the following methods of control shall be employed:

(i) Customs-approved metering and sampling installations provided by the importer;

(ii) Shore tank gauging; or

(iii) Weighing for trucks and railroad cars.

(2) Vessel ullages shall be taken in every case unless the port director determines that it is impracticable to do so for safety or technological reasons. Ullages may be taken for trucks and railroad cars if weighing or shore tank gauging is not available as a method of control. Vessel ullages will not be used to determine the quantity unladen unless none of the other methods provided for in this paragraph is available or adequate.

(3) The metering and sampling installations described in paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section are approved by Customs on a case-by-case basis. Importers seeking approval shall send a complete description of the installation to the port director who, with the concurrence of the Director, Laboratory & Scientific Services, or his designee, shall give approval or shall state, in writing, the reasons for disapproval. Approved installations are subject to periodic verification by Customs. Importers desiring to modify a Customs-approved installation shall obtain Customs approval beforehand.

(b) Duties of Customs officers. Customs officers may perform or witness ullaging and gauging as follows:

(1) Opening ullages.

(2) Closing ullages of carriers which have not completely discharged cargo, or if an importer or carrier requests Customs to witness closing ullages because of special problems.

(3) Shore tank gauges performed by company or related-party employees.

(4) Between 5 and 10 per cent of shore tank gauges conducted by commercial gaugers.

(5) Shore tank gauges, including those conducted by a commercial gauger if no carrier ullages are taken.

(c) Manifest discrepancies. Manifest discrepancies (shortages and overages) shall be reported by or on behalf of the carrier in the manner specified in §4.12 of this chapter. If a reported discrepancy is not explained to the satisfaction of the port director, the master or other person in charge, or the owner of the vessel or vehicle, or any person directly or indirectly responsible for the discrepancy, will be subject to the imposition of the appropriate penalty under section 460, 584, or 592, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1460, 1584, 1592).

[T.D. 80-142, 45 FR 36384, May 30, 1980, as amended by T.D. 82-224, 47 FR 53728, Nov. 29, 1982; T.D. 87-39, 52 FR 9790, Mar. 26, 1987; T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51268, Dec. 21, 1988; T.D. 91-77, 56 FR 46115, Sept. 10, 1991]

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§151.43   [Reserved]

§151.44   Storage tanks.

(a) Plans and gauge tables. When petroleum or petroleum products subject to duty at a specific rate per barrel are imported in bulk in tank vessels and are to be transferred into shore storage tanks, both the plans of each shore tank showing all outlets and inlets and the gauge table for each tank showing its capacity in barrels per centimeter or tenth of a centimeter of height shall be certified as correct by the proprietor of the tank. One set of these plans and gauge tables so certified shall be kept on file at the plant of the oil company and shall be available at all times to Customs officers. Another certified set of the shore tank plans and gauge tables shall be filed with the port director for use in verifying the Customs officers' reports. The port director may require such additional sets of shore tank plans, including subsidiary pipeline plans, and gauge tables as he may deem necessary. The storage tank proprietor shall maintain the plans and gauge tables for 3 years after discontinuing use of the storage tanks as bonded warehouses for the storage of imported petroleum or petroleum products.

(b) Tags required on valves. The inlet and outlet valves of each tank shall have tags of a permanent type affixed by the proprietor or lessee indicating the use of the valves.

(c) Verification of gauge tables. Whenever he has reason to suspect their reliability, the port director may require the measurement and calibrations shown on the gauge tables to be verified by a Customs officer. If no qualified Customs officer is available, the port director may accept an independent certification verifying the measurements and calibrations. The independent verification shall be performed at the expense of the storage tank proprietor.

[T.D. 80-142, 45 FR 36384, May 30, 1980, as amended by T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51268, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.45   Storage tanks bonded as warehouses.

(a) Application. Tanks for the storage of imported petroleum or petroleum products in bulk may be bonded as warehouses of class 2 if to be used exclusively for the storage of petroleum or petroleum products belonging or consigned to the owner or lessee of the tank. In addition to the documents and bonds required to be filed with the application to bond (see §19.2 of this chapter), the certified plans and gauge tables required by §151.44 shall be filed.

(b) Removal of nonbonded petroleum. If a bonded tank is not empty at the time the first importation of bonded petroleum or petroleum products is to be stored therein, the amount of nonbonded petroleum or petroleum products in the tank shall be withdrawn by the proprietor as soon as possible. The request to withdraw shall be in the form of a letter and no formal withdrawal need be filed. Domestic or duty-paid petroleum or petroleum products shall not thereafter be stored in the tank as long as the tank remains bonded.

(c) Information on warehouse withdrawal. Warehouse withdrawals of petroleum or petroleum products from bonded tanks shall show the information specified in §151.41, as well as the designation of the tank from which the merchandise is to be withdrawn. Such withdrawals may be made for “__ U.S. gallons, more or less”, but in no case may the estimate vary by more than three percent from the gross quantity unladen.

[T.D. 80-142, 45 FR 36384, May 30, 1980, as amended by T.D. 87-39, 52 FR 9790, Mar. 26, 1987]

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§151.46   Allowance for detectable moisture and impurities.

An allowance for all detectable moisture and impurities present in or upon imported petroleum or petroleum products shall be made in accordance with §158.13 of this chapter.

[T.D. 90-78, 55 FR 40167, Oct. 2, 1990]

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§151.47   Optional entry of net quantity of petroleum or petroleum products.

Instead of stating the gross quantity of petroleum or petroleum products on the entry summary, the importer may state the net quantity. The analytical report from the Customs-accredited commercial laboratory shall be filed with the entry summary.

[T.D. 87-39, 52 FR 9790, Mar. 26, 1987, as amended by T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988]

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Subpart D—Metal-Bearing Ores and Other Metal-Bearing Materials

§151.51   Sampling requirements.

(a) General. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, when metal-bearing ores and other metal-bearing materials which are classifiable under Chapter 26, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) (19 U.S.C. 1202), are entered for consumption or warehousing at the port of first arrival, they shall be sampled for assay and moisture purposes in accordance with §151.52. If proper facilities for weighing or sampling are not available at the port of entry, the merchandise shall be transported under bond to the place of sampling. The sampling or weighing of metal-bearing ores or materials at any place other than the port of entry shall be at the expense of the parties in interest.

(b) Ores of low metal content. When, on the basis of invoice information, the nature of any available sample, knowledge of prior importations of similar materials, and other data, the Center director is satisfied that metal-bearing ores entered under heading 2617, HTSUS, as containing less than 1 percent of metals dutiable under headings 2603, 2607, and 2608, HTSUS, are properly entered, he may liquidate the entry on the basis of the assay information contained in the entry papers. However, the sampling and testing procedures prescribed in §§151.52 and 151.54 shall be followed at random intervals for verification purposes.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.52   Sampling procedures.

(a) Commercial samples taken under Customs supervision. Representative commercial moisture and assay samples shall be taken under Customs supervision for testing by the Customs laboratory. The samples used for the moisture test shall be representative of the shipment at the time the shipment is weighed for Customs purposes. When a shipment is made up of a number of lots a composite sample of the shipment shall be drawn for assay, providing composite sampling is feasible and assays of the individual lots are not required for tariff classification or other Customs purposes. The composite sample shall consist of proportional parts by weight of the prepared sample drawn from the various lots represented and shall be thoroughly mixed.

(b) Commercial samples furnished by importer. When commercial samples cannot be taken under Customs supervision, the importer shall be required to furnish a verified commercial moisture sample and prepared assay sample certified to be representative of the shipment at the time the shipment was weighed for Customs purposes. The samples shall be in appropriate containers, properly labeled, and shall be accompanied by a statement including:

(1) Entry number,

(2) Lots represented,

(3) Kind of ore or material,

(4) Date and place where sampling occurred, and

(5) The name and address of the sampling concern.

(c) Samples taken by Customs. Where no commercial samples have been taken, an authorized CBP official shall take representative samples from different parts of the shipment.

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§151.53   Sample lockers.

A suitable place or containers shall be provided for the safekeeping of all Customs samples under Customs lock or seal.

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§151.54   Testing by Customs laboratory.

Samples taken in accordance with §151.52 shall be promptly forwarded to the appropriate Customs laboratory for testing in accordance with commercial methods. An authorized CBP official may secure from the importer a certified copy of the commercial settlement tests for moisture and for assay which shall be transmitted with the commercial samples to the Custom laboratory. If the Customs tests are not in substantial agreement with the settlement tests, the Customs laboratory director shall review his tests. The Customs tests shall be used in determining the final duties on the merchandise, except that the settlement tests shall be used if, in the opinion of the Customs laboratory director:

(a) The settlement and Customs tests differ by no more than is to be expected between qualified laboratories, and

(b) The use of the settlement test results will not require a different tariff classification or rate of duty than is indicated by the Customs test.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 87-39, 52 FR 9791, Mar. 26, 1987]

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§151.55   Deductions for loss during processing.

Deductions for the loss of copper, lead, or zinc content during processing, as authorized by Chapter 26, Additional U.S. Note 1, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), shall be made by the Center director in the liquidation of any entry only if the importer has followed the procedures set forth in that headnote. See §§19.17 through 19.25 of this chapter for procedures applicable to bonded smelting and refining warehouses.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988]

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Subpart E—Wool and Hair

§151.61   Definitions.

The following are general definitions for the purposes of this subpart:

(a) Clean kg. ‘Clean kg’ means kilograms of clean yield as defined in paragraph (b) of this section.

(b) Clean yield. Except for the purposes of carbonized fibers, “Clean yield” means the absolute clean content (that is, all that portion of the merchandise which consists exclusively of wool or hair free of all vegetable and other foreign material, containing by weight 12 percent of moisture and 1.5 percent of material removable from the wool or hair by extraction with alcohol, and having an ash content of not over 0.5 percent by weight), less an allowance, equal by weight to 0.5 percent of the absolute clean content plus 60 percent of the vegetable matter present, but not exceeding 15 percent by weight of the absolute clean content, for wool or hair that would ordinarily be lost during commercial cleaning operations.

(c) For the purposes of carbonized fibers, the term clean yield means the condition as entered.

(d) Sampling unit. “Sampling unit” means all the similar packages covered by one entry or withdrawal containing wool or hair of the same kind or same general condition and character, produced in the same country, packed in substantially the same manner, and entered as or found to be subject to the same rate of entry.

(e) General sample. “General sample” means the composite of the individual portions of wool or hair drawn from a sampling unit.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.62   Information on invoices.

Invoices of wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per clean kilogram under Chapter 51, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), shall show the following detailed information in addition to other information required:

(a) Condition, that is, whether in the grease, washed, pulled, on the skin, scoured, carbonized, burr-picked, willowed, handshaken, or beaten;

(b) Whether free of vegetable matter, practically free, slightly burry, medium burry, heavy burry;

(c) Whether in the fleece, skirted, matchings, or sorted;

(d) Length, that is, whether super combing, ordinary combing, clothing, or filling;

(e) Country of origin, and, if possible, the province, section, or locality of production;

(f) If wool, the type symbol by which it is bought and sold in the country of origin and the grade of each lot covered by the invoice, specifying the standard or basis used, that is, whether U.S. Official Standards or the commercial terms to designate grade in the country of shipment; and

(g) Net weight of each lot of wool or hair covered by the invoice in the condition in which it is shipped, and the shipper's estimate of the clean yield of each lot by weight or by percentage.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.63   Information on entry summary.

Each entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per clean kilogram under Chapter 51, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), shall show as to each lot of wool or hair covered thereby, in addition to other information required, the total estimated or actual net weight of the wool or hair in its condition as imported, its total estimated clean yield in kilograms, and the estimated percentage clean yield. (19 U.S.C. 1484.)

[T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.64   Extra copy of entry summary.

One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per clean kilogram shall be filed in addition to the copies otherwise required.

[T.D. 93-52, 58 FR 37854, July 14, 1993]

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§151.65   Duties.

Duties on wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per clean kilogram may be estimated at the time of filing the entry summary on the basis of the clean yield shown on the entry summary if the Center director is satisfied that the revenue will be properly protected. Liquidated duties shall be based upon the Center director's final determination of clean yield. Estimated and liquidated duties on wool or hair tested for clean yield pursuant to the provisions of §151.71, and withdrawn for consumption without a change in condition which affects the duties and in a quantity less than an entire sampling unit shall be determined on the basis of an appropriate adjustment of the estimated percentage clean yield shown on the entry summary for the wool or hair included in each of the lots covered by the withdrawal. This adjustment shall be made by increasing or decreasing such estimated percentage clean yield of each lot by the difference between the percentage clean yield of the related sampling unit, as determined by the Center director, and the weighted average percentage clean yield for the sampling unit, as computed from the estimated percentages clean yield and net weights shown on the entry summary for the lots included in the sampling unit.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 79-221, 44 FR 46829, Aug. 9, 1979; T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.66   Duty on samples.

Duty shall be assessed and collected on samples taken pursuant to any provision in this subpart, whether taken by the importer or by Customs, unless an exemption or remission is obtained by compliance with an applicable provision of the law or regulations. The duty shall be assessed upon the samples in accordance with their condition at the time of importation, except in the case of merchandise manipulated in warehouse pursuant to section 562, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1562). The collection of duty on the samples may be postponed when the importation concerned is not entered for consumption until the withdrawal of the merchandise from which the samples are taken, or until an application for the destruction or abandonment of such merchandise has been accepted pursuant to an appropriate provision of the law or regulations.

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§151.67   Sampling by importer.

The importer may be permitted after entry to draw samples under Customs supervision in reasonable quantities from the packages of wool or hair designated for examination, provided the bales or bags are properly repacked and repaired by him. Any samples so withdrawn shall be weighed and a record showing the quantities thereof shall be made and filed with the related entry.

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§151.68   Merchandise to be sampled and tested by Customs.

The following shall be weighed, sampled, and tested for clean yield, unless such sampling or testing is not feasible:

(a) All importation of wool or hair subject to duty at a rate per clean kilogram, except importations entered directly for manipulation under the provisions of section 562, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1562), or for manufacture under the provisions of section 311, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1311);

(b) All imported wool or hair manipulated under the provisions of section 562, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1562) and dutiable after manipulation as wool or hair at a rate per clean kilogram; and

(c) Such other imported wool or hair as an authorized CBP official may designate.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.69   Transfer or exportation of part of sampling unit.

(a) Transfer of right to withdraw. When an original sampling unit has been weighed, sampled, and tested in accordance with this subpart and a part of such unit is covered by a transfer of the right to withdraw made pursuant to section 557, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1557), the percentages clean yield of the part covered by the transfer and of the part not so covered shall be computed on the basis of the original Customs weights and test and the invoice data related to the respective parts.

(b) Exportation. When part of such an original sampling unit is exported from continuous Customs custody without having been manipulated as provided for in section 562, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1562), the percentage clean yield of the part not exported shall be determined, at the discretion of the Center director, either on the basis of a new determination by reweighing, resampling, and retesting, or by a computation as described in paragraph (a) of this section, for either the exported or the remaining part.

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§151.70   Method of sampling by Customs.

A general sample shall be taken from each sampling unit, unless it is not feasible to obtain a representative general sample of the wool or hair in a sampling unit or to test such a sample in accordance with the provisions of §151.71. At the request of the importer, two general samples may be taken from a sampling unit if the taking and testing of a second general sample is feasible. If two general samples are taken, one general sample shall be held for use in making a second test for clean yield if such a test is requested in accordance with the provisions of §151.71(c), or if a second test is found desirable by the Center director or the chief chemist.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 93-52, 58 FR 37854, July 14, 1993]

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§151.71   Laboratory testing for clean yield.

(a) Test and report by Customs laboratory. The clean yield of all general samples taken in accordance with §151.70 shall be determined by test in a Customs laboratory, unless it is found that it is not feasible to test such a sample and obtain a proper finding of percentage clean yield. A report of the percentage clean yield of each general sample as established by the test, or a statement of the reason for not testing a general sample, shall be forwarded to the Center director.

(b) Notification to importer. Where samples of wool or hair have been tested in a Customs laboratory and the Center director has received a copy of the Laboratory Report, Customs Form 6415, the Center director shall promptly provide notice of the test results by mailing a copy of that report to the importer.

(c) Importer's request for retest. If the importer is dissatisfied with the port director's or Center director's finding of clean yield, made before January 19, 2017, or the Center director's finding of clean yield made on or after January 19, 2017, he may file with CBP, either at the port of entry or electronically, a written request in duplicate for another laboratory test for percentage clean yield. Such request shall be filed within 14 calendar days after the date of mailing of the notice of the port director's or Center director's finding of clean yield. The request shall be granted if it appears to the Center director to be made in good faith and if a second general sample as provided for in §151.70 is available for testing, or if all packages or, in the opinion of the Commissioner of Customs, an adequate number of the packages represented by the general sample are available and in their original imported condition.

(d) Retest procedures. The second test shall be made upon the second general sample, if such a sample is available. If the second general sample is not available, the packages shall be reweighed, resampled, and tested in accordance with the provisions of this section. All costs and expenses of such operations, exclusive of the compensation of Customs officers, shall be borne by the importer, who may be present during such resampling and testing.

(e) Request for commercial test. If the importer is dissatisfied with the results of the second laboratory test, or if a second laboratory test is not feasible, the wool or hair may be retested by a commercial laboratory in accordance with §151.73.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 75-121, 40 FR 23458, May 30, 1975; T.D. 93-52, 58 FR 37854, July 14, 1993; CBP Dec. No. 16-26, 81 FR 93021, Dec. 20, 2016]

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§151.73   Importer's request for commercial laboratory test.

(a) Conditions for commercial test. If the importer is dissatisfied with the results of a retest made in accordance with §151.71(c), he may request that a commercial test be made to determine the percentage clean yield of the wool or hair.

(b) Time for filing request. The importer's request shall be filed in writing with the Center director within 14 calendar days after the date of mailing of the notice of the port director's or Center director's findings based on the retest mailed before January 19, 2017, or within 14 calendar days after the date of mailing of the notice of the Center director's findings based on the retest mailed on or after January 19, 2017.

(c) Procedures for commercial test. The Center director shall cause a representative quantity of the wool or hair in dispute to be selected and tested by a commercial method approved by the Commissioner of Customs. The yield, as determined by such commercial test, shall be suitably adjusted to coincide with the definition of clean yield in §151.61(b). Such test shall be made under the supervision and direction of the Center director at an establishment approved by him, and the expense thereof, including the actual expense of travel and subsistence of Customs officers but not their compensation, shall be paid by the importer.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 93-52, 58 FR 37854, July 14, 1993; CBP Dec. No. 16-26, 81 FR 93021, Dec. 20, 2016]

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§151.74   Retest at Center director's request.

If the Center director is not satisfied with the results of any test provided for in §151.71 or §151.73, he may, within 14 calendar days after receiving the report of the results of such test, proceed to have another test made upon a suitable sample of the wool or hair at the expense of the Government. When the Center director is proceeding to have another test made, he shall, within the 14-day period specified in this paragraph, notify the importer by mail of that fact.

[CBP Dec. No. 16-26, 81 FR 93021, Dec. 20, 2016]

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§151.75   Final determination of clean yield.

The Center director shall base his final determination of clean yield upon a consideration of all the tests made in connection with the wool or hair concerned.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 93-52, 58 FR 37854, July 14, 1993]

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§151.76   Grading of wool.

(a) Examination for grade. The Center director shall cause wool dutiable at a rate per clean kilogram to be examined for grade. The standards for determining grades of wool shall be those which are established from time to time by the Secretary of Agriculture pursuant to law and which are in effect on the date of importation of the wool, as provided by Chapter 51, Additional U.S. Note 2, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202).

(b) Notification to importer. If classification of the wool at the grade or grades determined on the basis of the examination will result in the assessment of duty at a rate higher than the rate provided for wool of the grade stated in the entry, the Center director shall promptly notify the importer by mail.

(c) Importer's request for reexamination. If the importer is dissatisfied with the port director's or Center director's findings as to the grade or grades of the wool, made before January 19, 2017, or the Center director's findings as to the grade or grades of wool made on or after January 19, 2017, he may, within 14 calendar days after the date of mailing of the notice of the port director's or Center director's findings, file in duplicate a written request with the Center director for another determination of grade or grades, stating the reason for the request. Notice of the Center director's findings on the basis of the reexamination of the wool shall be mailed to the importer.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988; CBP Dec. No. 16-26, 81 FR 93021, Dec. 20, 2016]

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Subpart F—Cotton

§151.81   Definition of staple length.

For the purposes of this subpart, “staple length” means the length of the fibers in a particular quantity of cotton designated in terms expressing the measurement by the millimeter or fraction thereof of a representative portion of the quantity in accordance with the Official Cotton Standards of the United States for length of staple, as established by the Secretary of Agriculture.

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.82   Information on invoices.

Invoices of cotton provided for in subheading 5201.00.10, 5201.00.20, 5201.00.50, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (19 U.S.C. 1202), shall show the following detailed information in addition to other required information:

(a) One of the following statements regarding each lot of cotton covered by the invoice:

(1) This is harsh or rough cotton under 19.05 millimeters in staple length;

(2) The staple length of this cotton is under 28.58 millimeters. (This statement is not to be used if paragraph (a)(1) of this section is applicable);

(3) The staple length of this cotton is 28.58 millimeters or more and under 34.93 millimeters;

(4) This cotton is harsh or rough cotton (other than cotton of perished staple, and cotton pickings), white in color, and has a staple length of 29.37 millimeters or more and under 44.45 millimeters;

(5) The staple length of this cotton is 34.93 millimeters or more and under 42.86 millimeters; or

(6) The staple length of this cotton is 42.86 millimeters or more.

(b) The name of the country of origin and, if practicable, the name of the province or other subdivision of the country of origin in which the cotton was grown.

(c) The variety of the cotton, such as Karnak, Gisha, Pima, Tanguis, etc.

[T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988]

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§151.83   Method of sampling.

For determining the staple length of any lot of cotton for any Customs purposes, samples of the lot shall be taken in accordance with commercial practice.

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§151.84   Determination of staple length.

The Center director shall have one or more samples of each sampled bale of cotton stapled by a qualified Customs officer, or a qualified employee of the Department of Agriculture designated by the Commissioner of Customs for the purpose, and shall promptly mail the importer a notice of the results determined.

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§151.85   Importer's request for redetermination.

If the importer is dissatisfied with the port director's or Center director's determination made before January 19, 2017, or the Center director's determination made on or after January 19, 2017, he may file with the Center director, within 14 calendar days after the mailing of the notice, a written request in duplicate for a redetermination of the staple length. Each such request shall include a statement of the claimed staple length for the cotton in question and a clear statement of the basis for the claim. The request shall be granted if it appears to the Center director to be made in good faith. In making the redetermination of staple length, the Center director may obtain an opinion of a board of cotton examiners from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, if he deems such action advisable. All expenses occasioned by any redetermination of staple length, exclusive of the compensation of CBP officers, shall be reimbursed to the Government by the importer.

[CBP Dec. No. 16-26, 81 FR 93021, Dec. 20, 2016]

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Subpart G—Fruit Juices

§151.91   Brix values of unconcentrated natural fruit juices.

The following values have been determined to be the average Brix values of unconcentrated natural fruit juices in the trade and commerce of the United States, for the purposes of the provisions of the Additional U.S. Notes to Chapter 20, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) (19 U.S.C. 1202), and will be used in determining the dutiable quantity of imports of concentrated fruit juices, using the procedure set forth in Additional U.S. Note 2, Chapter 20, HTSUS:

Kind of fruit juiceAverage Brix value (degrees)
Apple13.3
Apricot14.3
Bilberry (Whortleberry, Vaccinium Myrtillium)13.4
Black currant15.0
Blackberry10.0
Black raspberry11.1
Blueberry14.1
Boysenberry10.0
Carob40.0
Cherry14.3
Crabapple15.4
Cranberry10.5
Date18.5
Dewberry10.0
Elderberry11.0
Fig18.2
Gooseberry8.3
Grape (Vitis Vinifera)21.5
Grape (Slipskin varieties)16.0
Grapefruit10.2
Guava7.7
Lemon8.9
Lime10.0
Loganberry10.5
Mango17.0
Naranjilla10.5
Orange11.8
Papaya10.2
Passion Fruit15.3
Peach11.8
Pear15.4
Pineapple14.3
Plum14.3
Pomegranate18.2
Prune18.5
Quince13.3
Raisin18.5
Raspberry (Red raspberry)10.5
Red currant10.5
Soursop (Guanabana, Annono Muricata)16.0
Strawberry8.0
Tamarind55.0
Tangerine11.5
Youngberry10.0

[T.D. 73-175, 38 FR 17470, July 2, 1973, as amended by T.D. 74-41, 39 FR 2470, Jan. 23, 1974; T.D. 84-173, 49 FR 31852, Aug. 9, 1984; T.D. 89-1, 53 FR 51269, Dec. 21, 1988]

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Subpart H [Reserved]

Subpart I—Cigars, Cigarillos, and Tobacco

§151.111   Cigars, cigarillos, and tobacco of Cuban origin.

The tobacco National Import Specialist at the port of New York shall have general supervision of the examination of (a) all cigars or cigarillos which may be made or derived in whole or in part of Cuban articles, and (b) all tobacco which may be of Cuban origin.

[T.D. 81-189, 46 FR 37888, July 23, 1981]

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