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Title 12 Part 1003

Title 12 → Chapter X → Part 1003

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 12 Part 1003

e-CFR data is current as of August 16, 2018

Title 12Chapter X → Part 1003


Title 12: Banks and Banking


§1003.1   Authority, purpose, and scope.

(a) Authority. This part, known as Regulation C, is issued by the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau) pursuant to the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) (12 U.S.C. 2801 et seq.,) as amended. The information-collection requirements have been approved by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under 44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq. and have been assigned OMB numbers for institutions reporting data to the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (1557-0159), the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (3064-0046), the Federal Reserve System (7100-0247), the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) (2502-0529), the National Credit Union Administration (3133-0166), and the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (3170-0008).

(b) Purpose. (1) This part implements the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, which is intended to provide the public with loan data that can be used:

(i) To help determine whether financial institutions are serving the housing needs of their communities;

(ii) To assist public officials in distributing public-sector investment so as to attract private investment to areas where it is needed; and

(iii) To assist in identifying possible discriminatory lending patterns and enforcing antidiscrimination statutes.

(2) Neither the act nor this part is intended to encourage unsound lending practices or the allocation of credit.

(c) Scope. This part applies to financial institutions as defined in §1003.2(g). This part requires a financial institution to submit data to the appropriate Federal agency for the financial institution as defined in §1003.5(a)(4), and to disclose certain data to the public, about covered loans for which the financial institution receives applications, or that it originates or purchases, and that are secured by a dwelling located in a State of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, or the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

[76 FR 78468, Dec. 19, 2011, as amended at 80 FR 66308, Oct. 28, 2015]

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§1003.2   Definitions.

Link to an amendment published at 82 FR 43145, Sept. 13, 2017.

In this part:

(a) Act means the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) (12 U.S.C. 2801 et seq.), as amended.

(b) Application—(1) In general. Application means an oral or written request for a covered loan that is made in accordance with procedures used by a financial institution for the type of credit requested.

(2) Preapproval programs. A request for preapproval for a home purchase loan, other than a home purchase loan that will be an open-end line of credit, a reverse mortgage, or secured by a multifamily dwelling, is an application under this section if the request is reviewed under a program in which the financial institution, after a comprehensive analysis of the creditworthiness of the applicant, issues a written commitment to the applicant valid for a designated period of time to extend a home purchase loan up to a specified amount. The written commitment may not be subject to conditions other than:

(i) Conditions that require the identification of a suitable property;

(ii) Conditions that require that no material change has occurred in the applicant's financial condition or creditworthiness prior to closing; and

(iii) Limited conditions that are not related to the financial condition or creditworthiness of the applicant that the financial institution ordinarily attaches to a traditional home mortgage application.

(c) Branch office means:

(1) Any office of a bank, savings association, or credit union that is considered a branch by the Federal or State supervisory agency applicable to that institution, excluding automated teller machines and other free-standing electronic terminals; and

(2) Any office of a for-profit mortgage-lending institution (other than a bank, savings association, or credit union) that takes applications from the public for covered loans. A for-profit mortgage-lending institution (other than a bank, savings association, or credit union) is also deemed to have a branch office in an MSA or in an MD, if, in the preceding calendar year, it received applications for, originated, or purchased five or more covered loans related to property located in that MSA or MD, respectively.

(d) Closed-end mortgage loan means an extension of credit that is secured by a lien on a dwelling and that is not an open-end line of credit under paragraph (o) of this section.

(e) Covered loan means a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit that is not an excluded transaction under §1003.3(c).

(f) Dwelling means a residential structure, whether or not attached to real property. The term includes but is not limited to a detached home, an individual condominium or cooperative unit, a manufactured home or other factory-built home, or a multifamily residential structure or community.

(g) Financial institution means a depository financial institution or a nondepository financial institution, where:

(1) Depository financial institution means a bank, savings association, or credit union that:

(i) On the preceding December 31 had assets in excess of the asset threshold established and published annually by the Bureau for coverage by the Act, based on the year-to-year change in the average of the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, not seasonally adjusted, for each twelve month period ending in November, with rounding to the nearest million;

(ii) On the preceding December 31, had a home or branch office in an MSA;

(iii) In the preceding calendar year, originated at least one home purchase loan or refinancing of a home purchase loan, secured by a first lien on a one- to four-unit dwelling;

(iv) Meets one or more of the following two criteria:

(A) The institution is federally insured or regulated; or

(B) Any loan referred to in paragraph (g)(1)(iii) of this section was insured, guaranteed, or supplemented by a Federal agency, or was intended by the institution for sale to the Federal National Mortgage Association or the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation; and

(v) Meets at least one of the following criteria:

(A) In each of the two preceding calendar years, originated at least 25 closed-end mortgage loans that are not excluded from this part pursuant to §1003.3(c)(1) through (10) or (13); or

(B) In each of the two preceding calendar years, originated at least 500 open-end lines of credit that are not excluded from this part pursuant to §1003.3(c)(1) through (10); and

(2) Nondepository financial institution means a for-profit mortgage-lending institution (other than a bank, savings association, or credit union) that:

(i) On the preceding December 31, had a home or branch office in an MSA; and

(ii) Meets at least one of the following criteria:

(A) In each of the two preceding calendar years, originated at least 25 closed-end mortgage loans that are not excluded from this part pursuant to §1003.3(c)(1) through (10) or (13); or

(B) In each of the two preceding calendar years, originated at least 500 open-end lines of credit that are not excluded from this part pursuant to §1003.3(c)(1) through (10).

(h) [Reserved]

(i) Home improvement loan means a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit that is for the purpose, in whole or in part, of repairing, rehabilitating, remodeling, or improving a dwelling or the real property on which the dwelling is located.

(j) Home purchase loan means a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit that is for the purpose, in whole or in part, of purchasing a dwelling.

(k) Loan/Application Register means both the record of information required to be collected pursuant to §1003.4 and the record submitted annually or quarterly, as applicable, pursuant to §1003.5(a).

(l) Manufactured home means any residential structure as defined under regulations of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development establishing manufactured home construction and safety standards (24 CFR 3280.2). For purposes of §1003.4(a)(5), the term also includes a multifamily dwelling that is a manufactured home community.

(m) Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and Metropolitan Division (MD). (1) Metropolitan Statistical Area or MSA means a Metropolitan Statistical Area as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget.

(2) Metropolitan Division (MD) means a Metropolitan Division of an MSA, as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget.

(n) Multifamily dwelling means a dwelling, regardless of construction method, that contains five or more individual dwelling units.

(o) Open-end line of credit means an extension of credit that:

(1) Is secured by a lien on a dwelling; and

(2) Is an open-end credit plan as defined in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.2(a)(20), but without regard to whether the credit is consumer credit, as defined in §1026.2(a)(12), is extended by a creditor, as defined in §1026.2(a)(17), or is extended to a consumer, as defined in §1026.2(a)(11).

(p) Refinancing means a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit in which a new, dwelling-secured debt obligation satisfies and replaces an existing, dwelling-secured debt obligation by the same borrower.

(q) Reverse mortgage means a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit that is a reverse mortgage transaction as defined in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.33(a), but without regard to whether the security interest is created in a principal dwelling.

[80 FR 66308, Oct. 28, 2015, as amended at 82 FR 43132, Sept. 13, 2017]

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§1003.3   Exempt institutions and excluded transactions.

Link to an amendment published at 82 FR 43145, Sept. 13, 2017.

(a) Exemption based on state law. (1) A state-chartered or state-licensed financial institution is exempt from the requirements of this part if the Bureau determines that the institution is subject to a state disclosure law that contains requirements substantially similar to those imposed by this part and that contains adequate provisions for enforcement.

(2) Any state, state-chartered or state-licensed financial institution, or association of such institutions, may apply to the Bureau for an exemption under paragraph (a) of this section.

(3) An institution that is exempt under paragraph (a) of this section shall use the disclosure form required by its state law and shall submit the data required by that law to its state supervisory agency for purposes of aggregation.

(b) Loss of exemption. An institution losing a state-law exemption under paragraph (a) of this section shall comply with this part beginning with the calendar year following the year for which it last reported loan data under the state disclosure law.

(c) Excluded transactions. The requirements of this part do not apply to:

(1) A closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit originated or purchased by a financial institution acting in a fiduciary capacity;

(2) A closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit secured by a lien on unimproved land;

(3) Temporary financing;

(4) The purchase of an interest in a pool of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit;

(5) The purchase solely of the right to service closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit;

(6) The purchase of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit as part of a merger or acquisition, or as part of the acquisition of all of the assets and liabilities of a branch office as defined in §1003.2(c);

(7) A closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit, or an application for a closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit, for which the total dollar amount is less than $500;

(8) The purchase of a partial interest in a closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit;

(9) A closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit used primarily for agricultural purposes;

(10) A closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit that is or will be made primarily for a business or commercial purpose, unless the closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit is a home improvement loan under §1003.2(i), a home purchase loan under §1003.2(j), or a refinancing under §1003.2(p);

(11) A closed-end mortgage loan, if the financial institution originated fewer than 25 closed-end mortgage loans in either of the two preceding calendar years; a financial institution may collect, record, report, and disclose information, as described in §§1003.4 and 1003.5, for such an excluded closed-end mortgage loan as though it were a covered loan, provided that the financial institution complies with such requirements for all applications for closed-end mortgage loans that it receives, closed-end mortgage loans that it originates, and closed-end mortgage loans that it purchases that otherwise would have been covered loans during the calendar year during which final action is taken on the excluded closed-end mortgage loan;

(12) An open-end line of credit, if the financial institution originated fewer than 500 open-end lines of credit in either of the two preceding calendar years; a financial institution may collect, record, report, and disclose information, as described in §§1003.4 and 1003.5, for such an excluded open-end line of credit as though it were a covered loan, provided that the financial institution complies with such requirements for all applications for open-end lines of credit that it receives, open-end lines of credit that it originates, and open-end lines of credit that it purchases that otherwise would have been covered loans during the calendar year during which final action is taken on the excluded open-end line of credit; or

(13) A transaction that provided or, in the case of an application, proposed to provide new funds to the applicant or borrower in advance of being consolidated in a New York State consolidation, extension, and modification agreement classified as a supplemental mortgage under New York Tax Law section 255; the transaction is excluded only if final action on the consolidation was taken in the same calendar year as final action on the new funds transaction.

[76 FR 78468, Dec. 19, 2011, as amended at 80 FR 66309, Oct. 28, 2015; 82 FR 43132, Sept. 13, 2017]

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§1003.4   Compilation of reportable data.

(a) Data format and itemization. A financial institution shall collect data regarding applications for covered loans that it receives, covered loans that it originates, and covered loans that it purchases for each calendar year. A financial institution shall collect data regarding requests under a preapproval program, as defined in §1003.2(b)(2), only if the preapproval request is denied, is approved by the financial institution but not accepted by the applicant, or results in the origination of a home purchase loan. The data collected shall include the following items:

(1)(i) A universal loan identifier (ULI) for the covered loan or application that can be used to identify and retrieve the covered loan or application file. Except for a purchased covered loan or application described in paragraphs (a)(1)(i)(D) and (E) of this section, the financial institution shall assign and report a ULI that:

(A) Begins with the financial institution's Legal Entity Identifier (LEI) that is issued by:

(1) A utility endorsed by the LEI Regulatory Oversight Committee; or

(2) A utility endorsed or otherwise governed by the Global LEI Foundation (GLEIF) (or any successor of the GLEIF) after the GLEIF assumes operational governance of the global LEI system.

(B) Follows the LEI with up to 23 additional characters to identify the covered loan or application, which:

(1) May be letters, numerals, or a combination of letters and numerals;

(2) Must be unique within the financial institution; and

(3) Must not include any information that could be used to directly identify the applicant or borrower; and

(C) Ends with a two-character check digit, as prescribed in appendix C to this part.

(D) For a purchased covered loan that any financial institution has previously assigned or reported with a ULI under this part, the financial institution that purchases the covered loan must use the ULI that was assigned or previously reported for the covered loan.

(E) For an application that was previously reported with a ULI under this part and that results in an origination during the same calendar year that is reported in a subsequent reporting period pursuant to §1003.5(a)(1)(ii), the financial institution may report the same ULI for the origination that was previously reported for the application.

(ii) Except for purchased covered loans, the date the application was received or the date shown on the application form.

(2) Whether the covered loan is, or in the case of an application would have been, insured by the Federal Housing Administration, guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs, or guaranteed by the Rural Housing Service or the Farm Service Agency.

(3) Whether the covered loan is, or the application is for, a home purchase loan, a home improvement loan, a refinancing, a cash-out refinancing, or for a purpose other than home purchase, home improvement, refinancing, or cash-out refinancing.

(4) Whether the application or covered loan involved a request for a preapproval of a home purchase loan under a preapproval program.

(5) Whether the construction method for the dwelling related to the property identified in paragraph (a)(9) of this section is site-built or a manufactured home.

(6) Whether the property identified in paragraph (a)(9) of this section is or will be used by the applicant or borrower as a principal residence, as a second residence, or as an investment property.

(7) The amount of the covered loan or the amount applied for, as applicable.

(i) For a closed-end mortgage loan, other than a purchased loan, an assumption, or a reverse mortgage, the amount to be repaid as disclosed on the legal obligation. For a purchased closed-end mortgage loan or an assumption of a closed-end mortgage loan, the unpaid principal balance at the time of purchase or assumption.

(ii) For an open-end line of credit, other than a reverse mortgage open-end line of credit, the amount of credit available to the borrower under the terms of the plan.

(iii) For a reverse mortgage, the initial principal limit, as determined pursuant to section 255 of the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715z-20) and implementing regulations and mortgagee letters issued by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

(8) The following information about the financial institution's action:

(i) The action taken by the financial institution, recorded as one of the following:

(A) Whether a covered loan was originated or purchased;

(B) Whether an application for a covered loan that did not result in the origination of a covered loan was approved but not accepted, denied, withdrawn by the applicant, or closed for incompleteness; and

(C) Whether a preapproval request that did not result in the origination of a home purchase loan was denied or approved but not accepted.

(ii) The date of the action taken by the financial institution.

(9) The following information about the location of the property securing the covered loan or, in the case of an application, proposed to secure the covered loan:

(i) The property address; and

(ii) If the property is located in an MSA or MD in which the financial institution has a home or branch office, or if the institution is subject to paragraph (e) of this section, the location of the property by:

(A) State;

(B) County; and

(C) Census tract if the property is located in a county with a population of more than 30,000 according to the most recent decennial census conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

(10) The following information about the applicant or borrower:

(i) Ethnicity, race, and sex, and whether this information was collected on the basis of visual observation or surname;

(ii) Age; and

(iii) Except for covered loans or applications for which the credit decision did not consider or would not have considered income, the gross annual income relied on in making the credit decision or, if a credit decision was not made, the gross annual income relied on in processing the application.

(11) The type of entity purchasing a covered loan that the financial institution originates or purchases and then sells within the same calendar year.

(12)(i) For covered loans and applications that are approved but not accepted, and that are subject to Regulation Z, 12 CFR part 1026, other than assumptions, purchased covered loans, and reverse mortgages, the difference between the covered loan's annual percentage rate and the average prime offer rate for a comparable transaction as of the date the interest rate is set.

(ii) “Average prime offer rate” means an annual percentage rate that is derived from average interest rates and other loan pricing terms currently offered to consumers by a set of creditors for mortgage loans that have low-risk pricing characteristics. The Bureau publishes tables of average prime offer rates by transaction type at least weekly and also publishes the methodology it uses to derive these rates.

(13) For covered loans subject to the Home Ownership and Equity Protection Act of 1994, as implemented in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.32, whether the covered loan is a high-cost mortgage under Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.32(a).

(14) The lien status (first or subordinate lien) of the property identified under paragraph (a)(9) of this section.

(15)(i) Except for purchased covered loans, the credit score or scores relied on in making the credit decision and the name and version of the scoring model used to generate each credit score.

(ii) For purposes of this paragraph (a)(15), “credit score” has the meaning set forth in 15 U.S.C. 1681g(f)(2)(A).

(16) The principal reason or reasons the financial institution denied the application, if applicable.

(17) For covered loans subject to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.43(c), the following information:

(i) If a disclosure is provided for the covered loan pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), the amount of total loan costs, as disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.38(f)(4); or

(ii) If the covered loan is not subject to the disclosure requirements in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), and is not a purchased covered loan, the total points and fees charged in connection with the covered loan, expressed in dollars and calculated pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.32(b)(1).

(18) For covered loans subject to the disclosure requirements in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), the total of all itemized amounts that are designated borrower-paid at or before closing, as disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.38(f)(1).

(19) For covered loans subject to the disclosure requirements in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), the points paid to the creditor to reduce the interest rate, expressed in dollars, as described in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.37(f)(1)(i), and disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.38(f)(1).

(20) For covered loans subject to the disclosure requirements in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), the amount of lender credits, as disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.38(h)(3).

(21) The interest rate applicable to the approved application, or to the covered loan at closing or account opening.

(22) For covered loans or applications subject to Regulation Z, 12 CFR part 1026, other than reverse mortgages or purchased covered loans, the term in months of any prepayment penalty, as defined in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.32(b)(6)(i) or (ii), as applicable.

(23) Except for purchased covered loans, the ratio of the applicant's or borrower's total monthly debt to the total monthly income relied on in making the credit decision.

(24) Except for purchased covered loans, the ratio of the total amount of debt secured by the property to the value of the property relied on in making the credit decision.

(25) The scheduled number of months after which the legal obligation will mature or terminate or would have matured or terminated.

(26) The number of months, or proposed number of months in the case of an application, until the first date the interest rate may change after closing or account opening.

(27) Whether the contractual terms include or would have included any of the following:

(i) A balloon payment as defined in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.18(s)(5)(i);

(ii) Interest-only payments as defined in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.18(s)(7)(iv);

(iii) A contractual term that would cause the covered loan to be a negative amortization loan as defined in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.18(s)(7)(v); or

(iv) Any other contractual term that would allow for payments other than fully amortizing payments, as defined in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.43(b)(2), during the loan term, other than the contractual terms described in this paragraph (a)(27)(i), (ii), and (iii).

(28) The value of the property securing the covered loan or, in the case of an application, proposed to secure the covered loan relied on in making the credit decision.

(29) If the dwelling related to the property identified in paragraph (a)(9) of this section is a manufactured home and not a multifamily dwelling, whether the covered loan is, or in the case of an application would have been, secured by a manufactured home and land, or by a manufactured home and not land.

(30) If the dwelling related to the property identified in paragraph (a)(9) of this section is a manufactured home and not a multifamily dwelling, whether the applicant or borrower:

(i) Owns the land on which it is or will be located or, in the case of an application, did or would have owned the land on which it would have been located, through a direct or indirect ownership interest; or

(ii) Leases or, in the case of an application, leases or would have leased the land through a paid or unpaid leasehold.

(31) The number of individual dwelling units related to the property securing the covered loan or, in the case of an application, proposed to secure the covered loan.

(32) If the property securing the covered loan or, in the case of an application, proposed to secure the covered loan includes a multifamily dwelling, the number of individual dwelling units related to the property that are income-restricted pursuant to Federal, State, or local affordable housing programs.

(33) Except for purchased covered loans, the following information about the application channel of the covered loan or application:

(i) Whether the applicant or borrower submitted the application for the covered loan directly to the financial institution; and

(ii) Whether the obligation arising from the covered loan was, or in the case of an application, would have been initially payable to the financial institution.

(34) For a covered loan or application, the unique identifier assigned by the Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System and Registry for the mortgage loan originator, as defined in Regulation G, 12 CFR 1007.102, or Regulation H, 12 CFR 1008.23, as applicable.

(35)(i) Except for purchased covered loans, the name of the automated underwriting system used by the financial institution to evaluate the application and the result generated by that automated underwriting system.

(ii) For purposes of this paragraph (a)(35), an “automated underwriting system” means an electronic tool developed by a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit that provides a result regarding the credit risk of the applicant and whether the covered loan is eligible to be originated, purchased, insured, or guaranteed by that securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor. A person is a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit, respectively, if it has ever securitized, provided Federal government insurance, or provided a Federal government guarantee for a closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit.

(36) Whether the covered loan is, or the application is for, a reverse mortgage.

(37) Whether the covered loan is, or the application is for, an open-end line of credit.

(38) Whether the covered loan is, or the application is for a covered loan that will be, made primarily for a business or commercial purpose.

(b) Collection of data on ethnicity, race, sex, age, and income. (1) A financial institution shall collect data about the ethnicity, race, and sex of the applicant or borrower as prescribed in appendix B to this part.

(2) Ethnicity, race, sex, age, and income data may but need not be collected for covered loans purchased by a financial institution.

(c)-(d) [Reserved]

(e) Data reporting for banks and savings associations that are required to report data on small business, small farm, and community development lending under CRA. Banks and savings associations that are required to report data on small business, small farm, and community development lending under regulations that implement the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977 (12 U.S.C. 2901 et seq.) shall also collect the information required by paragraph 4(a)(9) of this section for property located outside MSAs and MDs in which the institution has a home or branch office, or outside any MSA.

(f) Quarterly recording of data. A financial institution shall record the data collected pursuant to this section on a loan/application register within 30 calendar days after the end of the calendar quarter in which final action is taken (such as origination or purchase of a covered loan, sale of a covered loan in the same calendar year it is originated or purchased, or denial or withdrawal of an application).

[80 FR 66310, Oct. 28, 2015, as amended at 82 FR 43132, Sept. 13, 2017]

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§1003.5   Disclosure and reporting.

Link to an amendment published at 80 FR 63312, Oct. 28, 2015.

Link to an amendment published at 80 FR 63313, Oct. 28, 2015.

Link to an amendment published at 82 FR 43145, Sept. 13, 2017.

Link to an amendment published at 82 FR 43145, Sept. 13, 2017.

(a) Reporting to agency. (1) By March 1 following the calendar year for which the loan data are compiled, a financial institution shall send its complete loan/application register to the agency office specified in appendix A of this part. The institution shall retain a copy for its records for at least three years.

(2) A subsidiary of a bank or savings association shall complete a separate loan/application register. The subsidiary shall submit the register, directly or through its parent, to the same agency as its parent.

(b) Disclosure statement. (1) The Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) will make available a disclosure statement based on the data each financial institution submits for the preceding calendar year pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section.

(2) No later than three business days after receiving notice from the FFIEC that a financial institution's disclosure statement is available, the financial institution shall make available to the public upon request at its home office, and each branch office physically located in each MSA and each MD, a written notice that clearly conveys that the institution's disclosure statement may be obtained on the Bureau's Web site at www.consumerfinance.gov/hmda.

(c) Modified loan/application register. (1) A financial institution shall make available to the public upon request at its home office, and each branch office physically located in each MSA and each MD, a written notice that clearly conveys that the institution's loan/application register, as modified by the Bureau to protect applicant and borrower privacy, may be obtained on the Bureau's Web site at www.consumerfinance.gov/hmda.

(2) A financial institution shall make available the notice required by paragraph (c)(1) of this section following the calendar year for which the data are collected.

(d) Availability of written notices. (1) A financial institution shall make the notice required by paragraph (c) of this section available to the public for a period of three years and the notice required by paragraph (b)(2) of this section available to the public for a period of five years. An institution shall make these notices available during the hours the office is normally open to the public for business.

(2) A financial institution may make available to the public, at its discretion and in addition to the written notices required by paragraphs (b)(2) or (c)(1) of this section, as applicable, its disclosure statement or its loan/application register, as modified by the Bureau to protect applicant and borrower privacy. A financial institution may impose a reasonable fee for any cost incurred in providing or reproducing these data.

(e) Posted notice of availability of data. A financial institution shall post a general notice about the availability of its HMDA data in the lobby of its home office and of each branch office physically located in each MSA and each MD. This notice must clearly convey that the institution's HMDA data is available on the Bureau's Web site at www.consumerfinance.gov/hmda.

(f) Aggregated data. Using data submitted by financial institutions pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section, the FFIEC will make available aggregate data for each MSA and MD, showing lending patterns by property location, age of housing stock, and income level, sex, ethnicity, and race.

[76 FR 78468, Dec. 19, 2011, as amended at 80 FR 66312, Oct. 28, 2015]

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§1003.6   Enforcement.

Link to an amendment published at 80 FR 66313, Oct. 28, 2015.

Link to an amendment published at 82 FR 43145, Sept. 13, 2017.

Link to an amendment published at 82 FR 43146, Sept. 13, 2017.

(a) Administrative enforcement. A violation of the Act or this part is subject to administrative sanctions as provided in section 305 of the Act, including the imposition of civil money penalties, where applicable. Compliance is enforced by the agencies listed in section 305 of the Act (12 U.S.C. 2804).

(b) Bona fide errors. (1) An error in compiling or recording loan data is not a violation of the act or this part if the error was unintentional and occurred despite the maintenance of procedures reasonably adapted to avoid such errors.

(2) An incorrect entry for a census tract number is deemed a bona fide error, and is not a violation of the act or this part, provided that the institution maintains procedures reasonably adapted to avoid such errors.

(3) If an institution makes a good-faith effort to record all data concerning covered transactions fully and accurately within thirty calendar days after the end of each calendar quarter, and some data are nevertheless inaccurate or incomplete, the error or omission is not a violation of the act or this part provided that the institution corrects or completes the information prior to submitting the loan/application register to its regulatory agency.

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Appendix A to Part 1003—Form and Instructions for Completion of HMDA Loan/Application Register

Link to an amendment published at 80 FR 66314, Oct. 28, 2015.

Paperwork Reduction Act Notice

This report is required by law (12 U.S.C. 2801-2810 and 12 CFR 1003). An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and an organization is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a valid Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Control Number. See 12 CFR 1003.1(a) for the valid OMB Control Numbers applicable to this information collection. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing the burden, to the respective agencies and to OMB, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Paperwork Reduction Project, Washington, DC 20503. Be sure to reference the applicable agency and the OMB Control Number, as found in 12 CFR 1003.1(a), when submitting comments to OMB.

Transition Requirements for Data Collected in 2017 and Submitted in 2018

1. The instructions for completion of the loan/application register in part I of this appendix applies to data collected during the 2017 calendar year and reported in 2018. Part I of this appendix does not apply to data collected pursuant to the amendments to Regulation C effective January 1, 2018.

I. Instructions for Completion of Loan/Application Register

A. Application or Loan Information

1. Application or Loan Number. Enter an identifying loan number that can be used later to retrieve the loan or application file. It can be any number of your institution's choosing (not exceeding 25 characters). You may use letters, numerals, or a combination of both.

2. Date Application Received. Enter the date the loan application was received by your institution by month, day, and year. If your institution normally records the date shown on the application form you may use that date instead. Enter “NA” for loans purchased by your institution. For paper submissions only, use numerals in the form MM/DD/YYYY (for example, 01/15/2003). For submissions in electronic form, the proper format is YYYYMMDD.

3. Type of Loan or Application. Indicate the type of loan or application by entering the applicable Code from the following:

Code 1—Conventional (any loan other than FHA, VA, FSA, or RHS loans)

Code 2—FHA-insured (Federal Housing Administration)

Code 3—VA-guaranteed (Veterans Administration)

Code 4—FSA/RHS-guaranteed (Farm Service Agency or Rural Housing Service)

4. Property Type. Indicate the property type by entering the applicable Code from the following:

Code 1—One-to four-family dwelling (other than manufactured housing)

Code 2—Manufactured housing

Code 3—Multifamily dwelling

a. Use Code 1, not Code 3, for loans on individual condominium or cooperative units.

b. If you cannot determine (despite reasonable efforts to find out) whether the loan or application relates to a manufactured home, use Code 1.

5. Purpose of Loan or Application. Indicate the purpose of the loan or application by entering the applicable Code from the following:

Code 1—Home purchase

Code 2—Home improvement

Code 3—Refinancing

a. Do not report a refinancing if, under the loan agreement, you were unconditionally obligated to refinance the obligation, or you were obligated to refinance the obligation subject to conditions within the borrower's control.

6. Owner Occupancy. Indicate whether the property to which the loan or loan application relates is to be owner-occupied as a principal residence by entering the applicable Code from the following:

Code 1—Owner-occupied as a principal dwelling

Code 2—Not owner-occupied as a principal dwelling

Code 3—Not applicable

a. For purchased loans, use Code 1 unless the loan documents or application indicate that the property will not be owner-occupied as a principal residence.

b. Use Code 2 for second homes or vacation homes, as well as for rental properties.

c. Use Code 3 if the property to which the loan relates is a multifamily dwelling; is not located in an MSA; or is located in an MSA or an MD in which your institution has neither a home nor a branch office. Alternatively, at your institution's option, you may report the actual occupancy status, using Code 1 or 2 as applicable.

7. Loan Amount. Enter the amount of the loan or application. Do not report loans below $500. Show the amount in thousands, rounding to the nearest thousand (round $500 up to the next $1,000). For example, a loan for $167,300 should be entered as 167 and one for $15,500 as 16.

a. For a home purchase loan that you originated, enter the principal amount of the loan.

b. For a home purchase loan that you purchased, enter the unpaid principal balance of the loan at the time of purchase.

c. For a home improvement loan, enter the entire amount of the loan—including unpaid finance charges if that is how such loans are recorded on your books—even if only a part of the proceeds is intended for home improvement.

d. If you opt to report home-equity lines of credit, report only the portion of the line intended for home improvement or home purchase.

e. For a refinancing, indicate the total amount of the refinancing, including both the amount outstanding on the original loan and any amount of “new money.”

f. For a loan application that was denied or withdrawn, enter the amount for which the applicant applied.

8. Request for Preapproval of a Home Purchase Loan. Indicate whether the application or loan involved a request for preapproval of a home purchase loan by entering the applicable Code from the following:

Code 1—Preapproval requested

Code 2—Preapproval not requested

Code 3—Not applicable

a. Enter Code 2 if your institution has a covered preapproval program but the applicant does not request a preapproval.

b. Enter Code 3 if your institution does not have a preapproval program as defined in §1003.2.

c. Enter Code 3 for applications or loans for home improvement or refinancing, and for purchased loans.

B. Action Taken

1. Type of Action. Indicate the type of action taken on the application or loan by using one of the following Codes.

Code 1—Loan originated

Code 2—Application approved but not accepted

Code 3—Application denied

Code 4—Application withdrawn

Code 5—File closed for incompleteness

Code 6—Loan purchased by your institution

Code 7—Preapproval request denied

Code 8—Preapproval request approved but not accepted (optional reporting)

a. Use Code 1 for a loan that is originated, including one resulting from a request for preapproval.

b. For a counteroffer (your offer to the applicant to make the loan on different terms or in a different amount from the terms or amount applied for), use Code 1 if the applicant accepts. Use Code 3 if the applicant turns down the counteroffer or does not respond.

c. Use Code 2 when the application is approved but the applicant (or the loan broker or correspondent) fails to respond to your notification of approval or your commitment letter within the specified time. Do not use this Code for a preapproval request.

d. Use Code 4 only when the application is expressly withdrawn by the applicant before a credit decision is made. Do not use Code 4 if a request for preapproval is withdrawn; preapproval requests that are withdrawn are not reported under HMDA.

e. Use Code 5 if you sent a written notice of incompleteness under §1002.9(c)(2) of Regulation B (Equal Credit Opportunity) and the applicant did not respond to your request for additional information within the period of time specified in your notice. Do not use this Code for requests for preapproval that are incomplete; these preapproval requests are not reported under HMDA.

2. Date of Action. For paper submissions only, enter the date by month, day, and year, using numerals in the form MM/DD/YYYY (for example, 02/22/2003). For submissions in electronic form, the proper format is YYYYMMDD.

a. For loans originated, enter the settlement or closing date.

b. For loans purchased, enter the date of purchase by your institution.

c. For applications and preapprovals denied, applications and preapprovals approved but not accepted by the applicant, and files closed for incompleteness, enter the date that the action was taken by your institution or the date the notice was sent to the applicant.

d. For applications withdrawn, enter the date you received the applicant's express withdrawal, or enter the date shown on the notification from the applicant, in the case of a written withdrawal.

e. For preapprovals that lead to a loan origination, enter the date of the origination.

C. Property Location

Except as otherwise provided, enter in these columns the applicable Codes for the MSA, or the MD if the MSA is divided into MDs, state, county, and census tract to indicate the location of the property to which a loan relates.

1. MSA or Metropolitan Division.—For each loan or loan application, enter the MSA, or the MD number if the MSA is divided into MDs. MSA and MD boundaries are defined by OMB; use the boundaries that were in effect on January 1 of the calendar year for which you are reporting. A listing of MSAs and MDs is available from the appropriate Federal agency to which you report data or the FFIEC.

2. State and County. Use the Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) two-digit numerical code for the state and the three-digit numerical code for the county. These codes are available from the appropriate Federal agency to which you report data or the FFIEC.

3. Census Tract.—Indicate the census tract where the property is located. Notwithstanding paragraph 6, if the property is located in a county with a population of 30,000 or less in the 2000 Census, enter “NA” (even if the population has increased above 30,000 since 2000), or enter the census tract number. County population data can be obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau.

4. Census Tract Number.—For the census tract number, consult the resources provided by the U.S. Census Bureau or the FFIEC.

5. Property Located Outside MSAs or Metropolitan Divisions.—For loans on property located outside the MSAs and MDs in which an institution has a home or branch office, or for property located outside of any MSA or MD, the institution may choose one of the following two options. Under option one, the institution may enter the MSA or MD, state and county codes and the census tract number; and if the property is not located in any MSA or MD, the institution may enter “NA” in the MSA or MD column. (Codes exist for all states and counties and numbers exist for all census tracts.) Under this first option, the codes and census tract number must accurately identify the property location. Under the second option, which is not available if paragraph 6 applies, an institution may enter “NA” in all four columns, whether or not the codes or numbers exist for the property location.

6. Data Reporting for Banks and Savings Associations Required To Report Data on Small Business, Small Farm, and Community Development Lending Under the CRA Regulations.—If your institution is a bank or savings association that is required to report data under the regulations that implement the CRA, you must enter the property location on your HMDA/LAR even if the property is outside the MSAs or MDs in which you have a home or branch office, or is not located in any MSA.

7. Requests for Preapproval. Notwithstanding paragraphs 1 through 6, if the application is a request for preapproval that is denied or that is approved but not accepted by the applicant, you may enter “NA” in all four columns.

D. Applicant Information—Ethnicity, Race, Sex, and Income

Appendix B contains instructions for the collection of data on ethnicity, race, and sex, and also contains a sample form for data collection.

1. Applicability. Report this information for loans that you originate as well as for applications that do not result in an origination.

a. You need not collect or report this information for loans purchased. If you choose not to report this information, use the Codes for “not applicable.”

b. If the borrower or applicant is not a natural person (a corporation or partnership, for example), use the Codes for “not applicable.”

2. Mail, Internet, or Telephone Applications.—All loan applications, including applications taken by mail, internet, or telephone must use a collection form similar to that shown in appendix B regarding ethnicity, race, and sex. For applications taken by telephone, the information in the collection form must be stated orally by the lender, except for information that pertains uniquely to applications taken in writing. If the applicant does not provide these data in an application taken by mail or telephone or on the internet, enter the Code for “information not provided by applicant in mail, internet, or telephone application” specified in paragraphs I.D.3., 4., and 5. of this appendix. (See appendix B for complete information on the collection of these data in mail, Internet, or telephone applications.)

3. Ethnicity of Borrower or Applicant. Use the following Codes to indicate the ethnicity of the applicant or borrower under column “A” and of any co-applicant or co-borrower under column “CA.”

Code 1—Hispanic or Latino

Code 2—Not Hispanic or Latino

Code 3—Information not provided by applicant in mail, internet, or telephone application

Code 4—Not applicable

Code 5—No co-applicant

4. Race of Borrower or Applicant. Use the following Codes to indicate the race of the applicant or borrower under column “A” and of any co-applicant or co-borrower under column “CA.”

Code 1—American Indian or Alaska Native

Code 2—Asian

Code 3—Black or African American

Code 4—Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

Code 5—White

Code 6—Information not provided by applicant in mail, internet, or telephone application

Code 7—Not applicable

Code 8—No co-applicant

a. If an applicant selects more than one racial designation, enter all Codes corresponding to the applicant's selections.

b. Use Code 4 (for ethnicity) and Code 7 (for race) for “not applicable” only when the applicant or co-applicant is not a natural person or when applicant or co-applicant information is unavailable because the loan has been purchased by your institution.

c. If there is more than one co-applicant, provide the required information only for the first co-applicant listed on the application form. If there are no co-applicants or co-borrowers, use Code 5 (for ethnicity) and Code 8 (for race) for “no co-applicant” in the co-applicant column.

5. Sex of Borrower or Applicant. Use the following Codes to indicate the sex of the applicant or borrower under column “A” and of any co-applicant or co-borrower under column “CA.”

Code 1—Male

Code 2—Female

Code 3—Information not provided by applicant in mail, internet, or telephone application

Code 4—Not applicable

Code 5—No co-applicant or co-borrower

a. Use Code 4 for “not applicable” only when the applicant or co-applicant is not a natural person or when applicant or co-applicant information is unavailable because the loan has been purchased by your institution.

b. If there is more than one co-applicant, provide the required information only for the first co-applicant listed on the application form. If there are no co-applicants or co-borrowers, use Code 5 for “no co-applicant” in the co-applicant column.

6. Income. Enter the gross annual income that your institution relied on in making the credit decision.

a. Round all dollar amounts to the nearest thousand (round $500 up to the next $1,000), and show in thousands. For example, report $35,500 as 36.

b. For loans on multifamily dwellings, enter “NA.”

c. If no income information is asked for or relied on in the credit decision, enter “NA.”

d. If the applicant or co-applicant is not a natural person or the applicant or co-applicant information is unavailable because the loan has been purchased by your institution, enter “NA.”

E. Type of Purchaser

Enter the applicable Code to indicate whether a loan that your institution originated or purchased was then sold to a secondary market entity within the same calendar year:

Code 0—Loan was not originated or was not sold in calendar year covered by register

Code 1—Fannie Mae

Code 2—Ginnie Mae

Code 3—Freddie Mac

Code 4—Farmer Mac

Code 5—Private securitization

Code 6—Commercial bank, savings bank, or savings association

Code 7—Life insurance company, credit union, mortgage bank, or finance company

Code 8—Affiliate institution

Code 9—Other type of purchaser

a. Use Code 0 for applications that were denied, withdrawn, or approved but not accepted by the applicant; and for files closed for incompleteness.

b. Use Code 0 if you originated or purchased a loan and did not sell it during that same calendar year. If you sell the loan in a succeeding year, you need not report the sale.

c. Use Code 2 if you conditionally assign a loan to Ginnie Mae in connection with a mortgage-backed security transaction.

d. Use Code 8 for loans sold to an institution affiliated with you, such as your subsidiary or a subsidiary of your parent corporation.

F. Reasons for Denial

1. You may report the reason for denial, and you may indicate up to three reasons, using the following Codes. Leave this column blank if the “action taken” on the application is not a denial. For example, do not complete this column if the application was withdrawn or the file was closed for incompleteness.

Code 1—Debt-to-income ratio

Code 2—Employment history

Code 3—Credit history

Code 4—Collateral

Code 5—Insufficient cash (downpayment, closing costs)

Code 6—Unverifiable information

Code 7—Credit application incomplete

Code 8—Mortgage insurance denied

Code 9—Other

2. If your institution uses the model form for adverse action contained in appendix C to Regulation B (Form C-1, Sample Notification Form), use the foregoing Codes as follows:

a. Code 1 for: Income insufficient for amount of credit requested, and Excessive obligations in relation to income.

b. Code 2 for: Temporary or irregular employment, and Length of employment.

c. Code 3 for: Insufficient number of credit references provided; Unacceptable type of credit references provided; No credit file; Limited credit experience; Poor credit performance with us; Delinquent past or present credit obligations with others; Garnishment, attachment, foreclosure, repossession, collection action, or judgment; and Bankruptcy.

d. Code 4 for: Value or type of collateral not sufficient.

e. Code 6 for: Unable to verify credit references; Unable to verify employment; Unable to verify income; and Unable to verify residence.

f. Code 7 for: Credit application incomplete.

g. Code 9 for: Length of residence; Temporary residence; and Other reasons specified on notice.

G. Pricing-Related Data

1. Rate Spread. a. For a home-purchase loan, a refinancing, or a dwelling-secured home improvement loan that you originated, report the spread between the annual percentage rate (APR) and the average prime offer rate for a comparable transaction if the spread is equal to or greater than 1.5 percentage points for first-lien loans or 3.5 percentage points for subordinate-lien loans. To determine whether the rate spread meets this threshold, use the average prime offer rate in effect for the type of transaction as of the date the interest rate was set, and use the APR for the loan, as calculated and disclosed to the consumer under §§1026.6 or 1026.18, as applicable, of Regulation Z (12 CFR part 1026). Current and historic average prime offer rates are set forth in the tables published on the FFIEC's Web site (http://www.ffiec.gov/hmda) entitled “Average Prime Offer Rates-Fixed” and “Average Prime Offer Rates-Adjustable.” Use the most recently available average prime offer rate. “Most recently available” means the average prime offer rate set forth in the applicable table with the most recent effective date as of the date the interest rate was set. Do not use an average prime offer rate before its effective date.

b. If the loan is not subject to Regulation Z, or is a home improvement loan that is not dwelling-secured, or is a loan that you purchased, enter “NA.”

c. Enter “NA” in the case of an application that does not result in a loan origination.

d. Enter the rate spread to two decimal places, and use a leading zero. For example, enter 03.29. If the difference between the APR and the average prime offer rate is a figure with more than two decimal places, round the figure or truncate the digits beyond two decimal places.

e. If the difference between the APR and the average prime offer rate is less than 1.5 percentage points for a first-lien loan and less than 3.5 percentage points for a subordinate-lien loan, enter “NA.”

2. Date the interest rate was set. The relevant date to use to determine the average prime offer rate for a comparable transaction is the date on which the loan's interest rate was set by the financial institution for the final time before closing. If an interest rate is set pursuant to a “lock-in” agreement between the lender and the borrower, then the date on which the agreement fixes the interest rate is the date the rate was set. If a rate is re-set after a lock-in agreement is executed (for example, because the borrower exercises a float-down option or the agreement expires), then the relevant date is the date the rate is re-set for the final time before closing. If no lock-in agreement is executed, then the relevant date is the date on which the institution sets the rate for the final time before closing.

3. HOEPA Status. a. For a loan that you originated or purchased that is subject to the Home Ownership and Equity Protection Act of 1994 (HOEPA), as implemented in Regulation Z (12 CFR 1026.32), because the APR or the points and fees on the loan exceed the HOEPA triggers, enter Code 1.

b. Enter Code 2 in all other cases. For example, enter Code 2 for a loan that you originated or purchased that is not subject to the requirements of HOEPA for any reason; also enter Code 2 in the case of an application that does not result in a loan origination.

H. Lien Status

Use the following Codes for loans that you originate and for applications that do not result in an origination:

Code 1—Secured by a first lien.

Code 2—Secured by a subordinate lien.

Code 3—Not secured by a lien.

Code 4—Not applicable (purchased loan).

a. Use Codes 1 through 3 for loans that you originate, as well as for applications that do not result in an origination (applications that are approved but not accepted, denied, withdrawn, or closed for incompleteness).

b. Use Code 4 for loans that you purchase.

II. Appropriate Federal Agencies for HMDA Reporting

A. A financial institution shall submit its loan/application register in electronic format to the appropriate Federal agency at the address identified by such agency. The appropriate Federal agency for a financial institution is determined pursuant to section 304(h)(2) of the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (12 U.S.C. 2803(h)(2)) or, with respect to a financial institution subject to the Bureau's supervisory authority under section 1025(a) of the Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010 (12 U.S.C. 5515(a)), is the Bureau.

B. Procedures for the submission of the loan/application register are available at www.consumerfinance.gov/hmda.

C. An authorized representative of the financial institution with knowledge of the data submitted shall certify to the accuracy and completeness of the data submitted.

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[76 FR 78468, Dec. 19, 2011, as amended at 80 FR 66313, Oct. 28, 2015]

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Appendix B to Part 1003—Form and Instructions for Data Collection on Ethnicity, Race, and Sex

You may list questions regarding the ethnicity, race, and sex of the applicant on your loan application form, or on a separate form that refers to the application. (See the sample data collection form below for model language.)

1. You must ask the applicant for this information (but you cannot require the applicant to provide it) whether the application is taken in person, by mail or telephone, or on the internet. For applications taken by telephone, you must state the information in the collection form orally, except for that information which pertains uniquely to applications taken in writing, for example, the italicized language in the sample data collection form.

2. Inform the applicant that Federal law requires this information to be collected in order to protect consumers and to monitor compliance with Federal statutes that prohibit discrimination against applicants on these bases. Inform the applicant that if the information is not provided where the application is taken in person, you are required to note the information on the basis of visual observation or surname.

3. If you accept an application through electronic media with a video component, you must treat the application as taken in person. If you accept an application through electronic media without a video component (for example, facsimile), you must treat the application as accepted by mail.

4. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(10)(i), if a covered loan or application includes a guarantor, you do not report the guarantor's ethnicity, race, and sex.

5. If there are no co-applicants, you must report that there is no co-applicant. If there is more than one co-applicant, you must provide the ethnicity, race, and sex only for the first co-applicant listed on the collection form. A co-applicant may provide an absent co-applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex on behalf of the absent co-applicant. If the information is not provided for an absent co-applicant, you must report “information not provided by applicant in mail, internet, or telephone application” for the absent co-applicant.

6. When you purchase a covered loan and you choose not to report the applicant's or co-applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex, you must report that the requirement is not applicable.

7. You must report that the requirement to report the applicant's or co-applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex is not applicable when the applicant or co-applicant is not a natural person (for example, a corporation, partnership, or trust). For example, for a transaction involving a trust, you must report that the requirement to report the applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex is not applicable if the trust is the applicant. On the other hand, if the applicant is a natural person, and is the beneficiary of a trust, you must report the applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex.

8. You must report the ethnicity, race, and sex of an applicant as provided by the applicant. For example, if an applicant selects the “Asian” box the institution reports “Asian” for the race of the applicant. Only an applicant may self-identify as being of a particular Hispanic or Latino subcategory (Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Other Hispanic or Latino) or of a particular Asian subcategory (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Other Asian) or of a particular Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander subcategory (Native Hawaiian, Guamanian or Chamorro, Samoan, Other Pacific Islander) or of a particular American Indian or Alaska Native enrolled or principal tribe. An applicant may select an ethnicity or race subcategory even if the applicant does not select an aggregate ethnicity or aggregate race category. For example, if an applicant selects only the “Mexican” box, the institution reports “Mexican” for the ethnicity of the applicant but does not also report “Hispanic or Latino.”

9. You must offer the applicant the option of selecting more than one ethnicity or race. If an applicant selects more than one ethnicity or race, you must report each selected designation, subject to the limits described below.

i. Ethnicity—Aggregate categories and subcategories. There are two aggregate ethnicity categories: Hispanic or Latino; and Not Hispanic or Latino. The Hispanic or Latino category has four subcategories: Mexican; Puerto Rican; Cuban; and Other Hispanic or Latino. You must report every aggregate ethnicity category selected by the applicant. If the applicant also selects one or more ethnicity subcategories, you must report each ethnicity subcategory selected by the applicant, except that you must not report more than a total of five aggregate ethnicity categories and ethnicity subcategories combined. For example, if the applicant selects both aggregate ethnicity categories and also selects all four ethnicity subcategories, you must report Hispanic or Latino, Not Hispanic or Latino, and any three, at your option, of the four ethnicity subcategories selected by the applicant. To determine how to report the Other Hispanic or Latino ethnicity subcategory for purposes of the five-ethnicity maximum, see paragraph 9.ii below.

ii. Ethnicity—Other subcategories. An applicant may select the Other Hispanic or Latino ethnicity subcategory, an applicant may provide a particular Hispanic or Latino ethnicity not listed in the standard subcategories, or an applicant may do both. If the applicant provides only a particular Hispanic or Latino ethnicity in the space provided, you are permitted, but are not required, to report Other Hispanic or Latino in addition to reporting the particular Hispanic or Latino ethnicity provided by the applicant. For example, if an applicant provides only “Dominican,” you should report “Dominican.” You are permitted, but not required, to report Other Hispanic or Latino as well. If an applicant selects the Other Hispanic or Latino ethnicity subcategory and also provides a particular Hispanic or Latino ethnicity not listed in the standard subcategories, you must report both the selection of Other Hispanic or Latino and the additional information provided by the applicant, subject to the five-ethnicity maximum. For purposes of the maximum of five reportable ethnicity categories and ethnicity subcategories combined, as set forth in paragraph 9.i, the Other Hispanic or Latino subcategory and additional information provided by the applicant together constitute only one selection. For example, if the applicant selects Other Hispanic or Latino and enters “Dominican” in the space provided, Other Hispanic or Latino and “Dominican” are considered one selection. Similarly, if the applicant only enters “Dominican” in the space provided and you report both “Dominican” and Other Hispanic or Latino as permitted by this paragraph 9.ii, the reported items together are considered one selection.

iii. Race—Aggregate categories and subcategories. There are five aggregate race categories: American Indian or Alaska Native; Asian; Black or African American; Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander; and White. The Asian and the Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander aggregate categories have seven and four subcategories, respectively. The Asian race subcategories are: Asian Indian; Chinese; Filipino; Japanese; Korean; Vietnamese; and Other Asian. The Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander race subcategories are: Native Hawaiian; Guamanian or Chamorro; Samoan; and Other Pacific Islander. You must report every aggregate race category selected by the applicant. If the applicant also selects one or more race subcategories, you must report each race subcategory selected by the applicant, except that you must not report more than a total of five aggregate race categories and race subcategories combined. For example, if the applicant selects all five aggregate race categories and also selects some race subcategories, you report only the five aggregate race categories. On the other hand, if the applicant selects the White, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander aggregate race categories, and the applicant also selects the Korean, Vietnamese, and Samoan race subcategories, you must report White, Asian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and any two, at your option, of the three race subcategories selected by the applicant. In this example, you must report White, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, and in addition you must report (at your option) either Korean and Vietnamese, Korean and Samoan, or Vietnamese and Samoan. To determine how to report an Other race subcategory and the American Indian or Alaska Native category for purposes of the five-race maximum, see paragraphs 9.iv and 9.v below.

iv. Race—Other subcategories. An applicant may select the Other Asian race subcategory or the Other Pacific Islander race subcategory, an applicant may provide a particular Asian race or Pacific Islander race not listed in the standard subcategories, or an applicant may do both. If the applicant provides only a particular Asian race or Pacific Islander race in the space provided, you are permitted, but are not required, to report Other Asian or Other Pacific Islander, as applicable, in addition to reporting the particular Asian race or Pacific Islander race provided by the applicant. For example, if an applicant provides only “Hmong,” you should report “Hmong.” You are permitted, but not required, to report Other Asian as well. If an applicant selects the Other Asian race or the Other Pacific Islander race subcategory and provides a particular Asian race or Pacific Islander race not listed in the standard subcategories, you must report both the selection of Other Asian or Other Pacific Islander, as applicable, and the additional information provided by the applicant, subject to the five-race maximum. For purposes of the maximum of five reportable race categories and race subcategories combined, as set forth in paragraph 9.iii, the Other race subcategory and additional information provided by the applicant together constitute only one selection. Thus, using the same facts in the example offered in paragraph 9.iii above, if the applicant also selects Other Asian and enters “Thai” in the space provided, Other Asian and Thai are considered one selection. Similarly, if the applicant enters only “Thai” in the space provided and you report both “Thai” and Other Asian as permitted by this paragraph 9.iv, the reported items together are considered one selection. In the same example, you must report any two (at your option) of the four race subcategories selected by the applicant, Korean, Vietnamese, Other Asian-Thai, and Samoan, in addition to the three aggregate race categories selected by the applicant.

v. Race—American Indian or Alaska Native category. An applicant may select the American Indian or Alaska Native race category, an applicant may provide a particular American Indian or Alaska Native enrolled or principal tribe, or an applicant may do both. If the applicant provides only a particular American Indian or Alaska Native enrolled or principal tribe in the space provided, you are permitted, but are not required, to report American Indian or Alaska Native in addition to reporting the particular American Indian or Alaska Native enrolled or principal tribe provided by the applicant. For example, if an applicant provides only “Navajo,” you should report “Navajo.” You are permitted, but not required, to report American Indian or Alaska Native as well. If an applicant selects the American Indian or Alaska Native race category and also provides a particular American Indian or Alaska Native enrolled or principal tribe, you must report both the selection of American Indian or Alaska Native and the additional information provided by the applicant. For purposes of the maximum of five reportable race categories and race subcategories combined, as set forth in paragraph 9.iii, the American Indian or Alaska Native category and additional information provided by the applicant together constitute only one selection.

10. If the applicant chooses not to provide the information for an application taken in person, note this fact on the collection form and then collect the applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex on the basis of visual observation or surname. You must report whether the applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex was collected on the basis of visual observation or surname. When you collect an applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex on the basis of visual observation or surname, you must select from the following aggregate categories: Ethnicity (Hispanic or Latino; not Hispanic or Latino); race (American Indian or Alaska Native; Asian; Black or African American; Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander; White); sex (male; female).

11. If the applicant declines to answer these questions by checking the “I do not wish to provide this information” box on an application that is taken by mail or on the internet, or declines to provide this information by stating orally that he or she does not wish to provide this information on an application that is taken by telephone, you must report “information not provided by applicant in mail, internet, or telephone application.”

12. If the applicant begins an application by mail, internet, or telephone, and does not provide the requested information on the application but does not check or select the “I do not wish to provide this information” box on the application, and the applicant meets in person with you to complete the application, you must request the applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex. If the applicant does not provide the requested information during the in-person meeting, you must collect the information on the basis of visual observation or surname. If the meeting occurs after the application process is complete, for example, at closing or account opening, you are not required to obtain the applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex.

13. When an applicant provides the requested information for some but not all fields, you report the information that was provided by the applicant, whether partial or complete. If an applicant provides partial or complete information on ethnicity, race, and sex and also checks the “I do not wish to provide this information” box on an application that is taken by mail or on the internet, or makes that selection when applying by telephone, you must report the information on ethnicity, race, and sex that was provided by the applicant.

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[80 FR 66314, Oct. 28, 2015, as amended at 82 FR 43133, Sept. 13, 2017]

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Appendix C to Part 1003—Procedures for Generating a Check Digit and Validating a ULI

The check digit for the Universal Loan Identifier (ULI) pursuant to §1003.4(a)(1)(i)(C) is calculated using the ISO/IEC 7064, MOD 97-10 as it appears on the International Standard ISO/IEC 7064:2003, which is published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).

©ISO. This material is reproduced from ISO/IEC 7064:2003 with permission of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) on behalf of ISO. All rights reserved.

Generating a Check Digit

Step 1: Starting with the leftmost character in the string that consists of the combination of the Legal Entity Identifier (LEI) pursuant to §1003.4(a)(1)(i)(A) and the additional characters identifying the covered loan or application pursuant to §1003.4(a)(1)(i)(B), replace each alphabetic character with numbers in accordance with Table I below to obtain all numeric values in the string.

Table I—Alphabetic to Numeric Conversion Table

The alphabetic characters are not case-sensitive and each letter, whether it is capitalized or in lower-case, is equal to the same value as each letter illustrates in the conversion table. For example, A and a are each equal to 10.

A = 10

B = 11

C = 12

D = 13

E = 14

F = 15

G = 16

H = 17

I = 18

J = 19

K = 20

L = 21

M = 22

N = 23

O = 24

P = 25

Q = 26

R = 27

S = 28

T = 29

U = 30

V = 31

W = 32

X = 33

Y = 34

Z = 35

Step 2: After converting the combined string of characters to all numeric values, append two zeros to the rightmost positions.

Step 3: Apply the mathematical function mod = (n,97) where n = the number obtained in step 2 above and 97 is the divisor.

Alternatively, to calculate without using the modulus operator, divide the numbers in step 2 above by 97. Truncate the remainder to three digits and multiply it by 97. Round the result to the nearest whole number.

Step 4: Subtract the result in step 3 from 98. If the result is one digit, add a leading 0 to make it two digits.

Step 5: The two digits in the result from step 4 is the check digit. Append the resulting check digit to the rightmost position in the combined string of characters described in step 1 above to generate the ULI.

Example

For example, assume the LEI for a financial institution is 10Bx939c5543TqA1144M and the financial institution assigned the following string of characters to identify the covered loan: 999143X. The combined string of characters is 10Bx939c5543TqA1144M999143X.

Step 1: Starting with the leftmost character in the combined string of characters, replace each alphabetic character with numbers in accordance with Table I above to obtain all numeric values in the string. The result is 10113393912554329261011442299914333.

Step 2: Append two zeros to the rightmost positions in the combined string. The result is 1011339391255432926101144229991433300.

Step 3: Apply the mathematical function mod = (n,97) where n = the number obtained in step 2 above and 97 is the divisor. The result is 60.

Alternatively, to calculate without using the modulus operator, divide the numbers in step 2 above by 97. The result is 1042617929129312294946332267952920.618556701030928. Truncate the remainder to three digits, which is .618, and multiply it by 97. The result is 59.946. Round this result to the nearest whole number, which is 60.

Step 4: Subtract the result in step 3 from 98. The result is 38.

Step 5: The two digits in the result from step 4 is the check digit. Append the check digit to the rightmost positions in the combined string of characters that consists of the LEI and the string of characters assigned by the financial institution to identify the covered loan to obtain the ULI. In this example, the ULI would be 10Bx939c5543TqA1144M999143X38.

Validating A ULI

To determine whether the ULI contains a transcription error using the check digit calculation, the procedures are described below.

Step 1: Starting with the leftmost character in the ULI, replace each alphabetic character with numbers in accordance with Table I above to obtain all numeric values in the string.

Step 2: Apply the mathematical function mod=(n,97) where n=the number obtained in step 1 above and 97 is the divisor.

Step 3: If the result is 1, the ULI does not contain transcription errors.

Example

For example, the ULI assigned to a covered loan is 10Bx939c5543TqA1144M999143X38.

Step 1: Starting with the leftmost character in the ULI, replace each alphabetic character with numbers in accordance with Table I above to obtain all numeric values in the string. The result is 1011339391255432926101144229991433338.

Step 2: Apply the mathematical function mod=(n,97) where n is the number obtained in step 1 above and 97 is the divisor.

Step 3: The result is 1. The ULI does not contain transcription errors.

[80 FR 66316, Oct. 28, 2015, as amended at 82 FR 43135, Sept. 13, 2017]

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Supplement I to Part 1003—Official Interpretations

1. Status. The commentary in this supplement is the vehicle by which the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection issues formal interpretations of Regulation C (12 CFR part 1003).

Section 1003.2—Definitions

2(b) Application

1. Consistency with Regulation B. Bureau interpretations that appear in the official commentary to Regulation B (Equal Credit Opportunity Act, 12 CFR part 1002, Supplement I) are generally applicable to the definition of application under Regulation C. However, under Regulation C the definition of an application does not include prequalification requests.

2. Prequalification. A prequalification request is a request by a prospective loan applicant (other than a request for preapproval) for a preliminary determination on whether the prospective loan applicant would likely qualify for credit under an institution's standards, or for a determination on the amount of credit for which the prospective applicant would likely qualify. Some institutions evaluate prequalification requests through a procedure that is separate from the institution's normal loan application process; others use the same process. In either case, Regulation C does not require an institution to report prequalification requests on the loan/application register, even though these requests may constitute applications under Regulation B for purposes of adverse action notices.

3. Requests for preapproval. To be a preapproval program as defined in §1003.2(b)(2), the written commitment issued under the program must result from a comprehensive review of the creditworthiness of the applicant, including such verification of income, resources, and other matters as is typically done by the institution as part of its normal credit evaluation program. In addition to conditions involving the identification of a suitable property and verification that no material change has occurred in the applicant's financial condition or creditworthiness, the written commitment may be subject only to other conditions (unrelated to the financial condition or creditworthiness of the applicant) that the lender ordinarily attaches to a traditional home mortgage application approval. These conditions are limited to conditions such as requiring an acceptable title insurance binder or a certificate indicating clear termite inspection, and, in the case where the applicant plans to use the proceeds from the sale of the applicant's present home to purchase a new home, a settlement statement showing adequate proceeds from the sale of the present home. Regardless of its name, a program that satisfies the definition of a preapproval program in §1003.2(b)(2) is a preapproval program for purposes of Regulation C. Conversely, a program that a financial institution describes as a “preapproval program” that does not satisfy the requirements of §1003.2(b)(2) is not a preapproval program for purposes of Regulation C. If a financial institution does not regularly use the procedures specified in §1003.2(b)(2), but instead considers requests for preapprovals on an ad hoc basis, the financial institution need not treat ad hoc requests as part of a preapproval program for purposes of Regulation C. A financial institution should, however, be generally consistent in following uniform procedures for considering such ad hoc requests.

2(c) Branch Office

Paragraph 2(c)(1)

1. Credit unions. For purposes of Regulation C, a “branch” of a credit union is any office where member accounts are established or loans are made, whether or not the office has been approved as a branch by a Federal or State agency. (See 12 U.S.C. 1752.)

2. Bank, savings association, or credit unions. A branch office of a bank, savings association, or credit union does not include a loan-production office if the loan-production office is not considered a branch by the Federal or State supervisory authority applicable to that institution. A branch office also does not include the office of an affiliate or of a third party, such as a third-party broker.

Paragraph 2(c)(2)

1. General. A branch office of a for-profit mortgage lending institution, other than a bank savings association or credit union, does not include the office of an affiliate or of a third party, such as a third-party broker.

2(d) Closed-end Mortgage Loan

1. Dwelling-secured. Section 1003.2(d) defines a closed-end mortgage loan as an extension of credit that is secured by a lien on a dwelling and that is not an open-end line of credit under §1003.2(o). Thus, for example, a loan to purchase a dwelling and secured only by a personal guarantee is not a closed-end mortgage loan because it is not dwelling-secured.

2. Extension of credit. Under §1003.2(d), a dwelling-secured loan is not a closed-end mortgage loan unless it involves an extension of credit. For example, some transactions completed pursuant to installment sales contracts, such as some land contracts, depending on the facts and circumstances, may or may not involve extensions of credit rendering the transactions closed-end mortgage loans. In general, extension of credit under §1003.2(d) refers to the granting of credit only pursuant to a new debt obligation. Thus, except as described in comments 2(d)-2.i and .ii, if a transaction modifies, renews, extends, or amends the terms of an existing debt obligation, but the existing debt obligation is not satisfied and replaced, the transaction is not a closed-end mortgage loan under §1003.2(d) because there has been no new extension of credit. The phrase extension of credit thus is defined differently under Regulation C than under Regulation B, 12 CFR part 1002.

i. Assumptions. For purposes of Regulation C, an assumption is a transaction in which an institution enters into a written agreement accepting a new borrower in place of an existing borrower as the obligor on an existing debt obligation. For purposes of Regulation C, assumptions include successor-in-interest transactions, in which an individual succeeds the prior owner as the property owner and then assumes the existing debt secured by the property. Under §1003.2(d), assumptions are extensions of credit even if the new borrower merely assumes the existing debt obligation and no new debt obligation is created. See also comment 2(j)-5.

ii. New York State consolidation, extension, and modification agreements. A transaction completed pursuant to a New York State consolidation, extension, and modification agreement and classified as a supplemental mortgage under New York Tax Law section 255, such that the borrower owes reduced or no mortgage recording taxes, is an extension of credit under §1003.2(d). Comments 2(i)-1, 2(j)-5, and 2(p)-2 clarify whether such transactions are home improvement loans, home purchase loans, or refinancings, respectively. Section 1003.3(c)(13) provides an exclusion from the reporting requirement for a preliminary transaction providing or, in the case of an application, proposing to provide new funds to the borrower in advance of being consolidated within the same calendar year into a supplemental mortgage under New York Tax Law section 255. See comment 3(c)(13)-1 concerning how to report a supplemental mortgage under New York Tax Law section 255 in this situation.

2(f) Dwelling

1. General. The definition of a dwelling is not limited to the principal or other residence of the applicant or borrower, and thus includes vacation or second homes and investment properties.

2. Multifamily residential structures and communities. A dwelling also includes a multifamily residential structure or community such as an apartment, condominium, cooperative building or housing complex, or a manufactured home community. A loan related to a manufactured home community is secured by a dwelling for purposes of §1003.2(f) even if it is not secured by any individual manufactured homes, but only by the land that constitutes the manufactured home community including sites for manufactured homes. However, a loan related to a multifamily residential structure or community that is not a manufactured home community is not secured by a dwelling for purposes of §1003.2(f) if it is not secured by any individual dwelling units and is, for example, instead secured only by property that only includes common areas, or is secured only by an assignment of rents or dues.

3. Exclusions. Recreational vehicles, including boats, campers, travel trailers, and park model recreational vehicles, are not considered dwellings for purposes of §1003.2(f), regardless of whether they are used as residences. Houseboats, floating homes, and mobile homes constructed before June 15, 1976, are also excluded, regardless of whether they are used as residences. Also excluded are transitory residences such as hotels, hospitals, college dormitories, and recreational vehicle parks, and structures originally designed as dwellings but used exclusively for commercial purposes, such as homes converted to daycare facilities or professional offices.

4. Mixed-use properties. A property used for both residential and commercial purposes, such as a building containing apartment units and retail space, is a dwelling if the property's primary use is residential. An institution may use any reasonable standard to determine the primary use of the property, such as by square footage or by the income generated. An institution may select the standard to apply on a case-by-case basis.

5. Properties with service and medical components. For purposes of §1003.2(f), a property used for both long-term housing and to provide related services, such as assisted living for senior citizens or supportive housing for persons with disabilities, is a dwelling and does not have a non-residential purpose merely because the property is used for both housing and to provide services. However, transitory residences that are used to provide such services are not dwellings. See comment 2(f)-3. Properties that are used to provide medical care, such as skilled nursing, rehabilitation, or long-term medical care, also are not dwellings. See comment 2(f)-3. If a property that is used for both long-term housing and to provide related services also is used to provide medical care, the property is a dwelling if its primary use is residential. An institution may use any reasonable standard to determine the property's primary use, such as by square footage, income generated, or number of beds or units allocated for each use. An institution may select the standard to apply on a case-by-case basis.

2(g) Financial Institution

1. Preceding calendar year and preceding December 31. The definition of financial institution refers both to the preceding calendar year and the preceding December 31. These terms refer to the calendar year and the December 31 preceding the current calendar year. For example, in 2019, the preceding calendar year is 2018 and the preceding December 31 is December 31, 2018. Accordingly, in 2019, Financial Institution A satisfies the asset-size threshold described in §1003.2(g)(1)(i) if its assets exceeded the threshold specified in comment 2(g)-2 on December 31, 2018. Likewise, in 2020, Financial Institution A does not meet the loan-volume test described in §1003.2(g)(1)(v)(A) if it originated fewer than 25 closed-end mortgage loans during either 2018 or 2019.

2. Adjustment of exemption threshold for banks, savings associations, and credit unions. For data collection in 2018, the asset-size exemption threshold is $45 million. Banks, savings associations, and credit unions with assets at or below $45 million as of December 31, 2017, are exempt from collecting data for 2018.

3. Merger or acquisition—coverage of surviving or newly formed institution. After a merger or acquisition, the surviving or newly formed institution is a financial institution under §1003.2(g) if it, considering the combined assets, location, and lending activity of the surviving or newly formed institution and the merged or acquired institutions or acquired branches, satisfies the criteria included in §1003.2(g). For example, A and B merge. The surviving or newly formed institution meets the loan threshold described in §1003.2(g)(1)(v)(B) if the surviving or newly formed institution, A, and B originated a combined total of at least 500 open-end lines of credit in each of the two preceding calendar years. Likewise, the surviving or newly formed institution meets the asset-size threshold in §1003.2(g)(1)(i) if its assets and the combined assets of A and B on December 31 of the preceding calendar year exceeded the threshold described in §1003.2(g)(1)(i). Comment 2(g)-4 discusses a financial institution's responsibilities during the calendar year of a merger.

4. Merger or acquisition—coverage for calendar year of merger or acquisition. The scenarios described below illustrate a financial institution's responsibilities for the calendar year of a merger or acquisition. For purposes of these illustrations, a “covered institution” means a financial institution, as defined in §1003.2(g), that is not exempt from reporting under §1003.3(a), and “an institution that is not covered” means either an institution that is not a financial institution, as defined in §1003.2(g), or an institution that is exempt from reporting under §1003.3(a).

i. Two institutions that are not covered merge. The surviving or newly formed institution meets all of the requirements necessary to be a covered institution. No data collection is required for the calendar year of the merger (even though the merger creates an institution that meets all of the requirements necessary to be a covered institution). When a branch office of an institution that is not covered is acquired by another institution that is not covered, and the acquisition results in a covered institution, no data collection is required for the calendar year of the acquisition.

ii. A covered institution and an institution that is not covered merge. The covered institution is the surviving institution, or a new covered institution is formed. For the calendar year of the merger, data collection is required for covered loans and applications handled in the offices of the merged institution that was previously covered and is optional for covered loans and applications handled in offices of the merged institution that was previously not covered. When a covered institution acquires a branch office of an institution that is not covered, data collection is optional for covered loans and applications handled by the acquired branch office for the calendar year of the acquisition.

iii. A covered institution and an institution that is not covered merge. The institution that is not covered is the surviving institution, or a new institution that is not covered is formed. For the calendar year of the merger, data collection is required for covered loans and applications handled in offices of the previously covered institution that took place prior to the merger. After the merger date, data collection is optional for covered loans and applications handled in the offices of the institution that was previously covered. When an institution remains not covered after acquiring a branch office of a covered institution, data collection is required for transactions of the acquired branch office that take place prior to the acquisition. Data collection by the acquired branch office is optional for transactions taking place in the remainder of the calendar year after the acquisition.

iv. Two covered institutions merge. The surviving or newly formed institution is a covered institution. Data collection is required for the entire calendar year of the merger. The surviving or newly formed institution files either a consolidated submission or separate submissions for that calendar year. When a covered institution acquires a branch office of a covered institution, data collection is required for the entire calendar year of the merger. Data for the acquired branch office may be submitted by either institution.

5. Originations. Whether an institution is a financial institution depends in part on whether the institution originated at least 25 closed-end mortgage loans in each of the two preceding calendar years or at least 500 open-end lines of credit in each of the two preceding calendar years. Comments 4(a)-2 through -4 discuss whether activities with respect to a particular closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit constitute an origination for purposes of §1003.2(g).

6. Branches of foreign banks—treated as banks. A Federal branch or a State-licensed or insured branch of a foreign bank that meets the definition of a “bank” under section 3(a)(1) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1813(a)) is a bank for the purposes of §1003.2(g).

7. Branches and offices of foreign banks and other entities—treated as nondepository financial institutions. A Federal agency, State-licensed agency, State-licensed uninsured branch of a foreign bank, commercial lending company owned or controlled by a foreign bank, or entity operating under section 25 or 25A of the Federal Reserve Act, 12 U.S.C. 601 and 611 (Edge Act and agreement corporations) may not meet the definition of “bank” under the Federal Deposit Insurance Act and may thereby fail to satisfy the definition of a depository financial institution under §1003.2(g)(1). An entity is nonetheless a financial institution if it meets the definition of nondepository financial institution under §1003.2(g)(2).

2(i) Home Improvement Loan

1. General. Section 1003.2(i) defines a home improvement loan as a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit that is for the purpose, in whole or in part, of repairing, rehabilitating, remodeling, or improving a dwelling or the real property on which the dwelling is located. For example, a closed-end mortgage loan obtained to repair a dwelling by replacing a roof is a home improvement loan under §1003.2(i). A loan or line of credit is a home improvement loan even if only a part of the purpose is for repairing, rehabilitating, remodeling, or improving a dwelling. For example, an open-end line of credit obtained in part to remodel a kitchen and in part to pay college tuition is a home improvement loan under §1003.2(i). Similarly, for example, a loan that is completed pursuant to a New York State consolidation, extension, and modification agreement and that is classified as a supplemental mortgage under New York Tax Law section 255, such that the borrower owes reduced or no mortgage recording taxes, is a home improvement loan if any of the loan's funds are for home improvement purposes. See also comment 2(d)-2.ii.

2. Improvements to real property. Home improvements include improvements both to a dwelling and to the real property on which the dwelling is located (for example, installation of a swimming pool, construction of a garage, or landscaping).

3. Commercial and other loans. A home improvement loan may include a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit originated outside an institution's residential mortgage lending division, such as a loan or line of credit to improve an apartment building originated in the commercial loan department.

4. Mixed-use property. A closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit to improve a multifamily dwelling used for residential and commercial purposes (for example, a building containing apartment units and retail space), or the real property on which such a dwelling is located, is a home improvement loan if the loan's proceeds are used either to improve the entire property (for example, to replace the heating system), or if the proceeds are used primarily to improve the residential portion of the property. An institution may use any reasonable standard to determine the primary use of the loan proceeds. An institution may select the standard to apply on a case-by-case basis. See comment 3(c)(10)-3.ii for guidance on loans to improve primarily the commercial portion of a dwelling other than a multifamily dwelling.

5. Multiple-purpose loans. A closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit may be used for multiple purposes. For example, a closed-end mortgage loan that is a home improvement loan under §1003.2(i) may also be a refinancing under §1003.2(p) if the transaction is a cash-out refinancing and the funds will be used to improve a home. Such a transaction is a multiple-purpose loan. Comment 4(a)(3)-3 provides details about how to report multiple-purpose covered loans.

6. Statement of borrower. In determining whether a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit, or an application for a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit, is for home improvement purposes, an institution may rely on the applicant's or borrower's stated purpose(s) for the loan or line of credit at the time the application is received or the credit decision is made. An institution need not confirm that the borrower actually uses any of the funds for the stated purpose(s).

2(j) Home Purchase Loan

1. Multiple properties. A home purchase loan includes a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit secured by one dwelling and used to purchase another dwelling. For example, if a person obtains a home-equity loan or a reverse mortgage secured by dwelling A to purchase dwelling B, the home-equity loan or the reverse mortgage is a home purchase loan under §1003.2(j).

2. Commercial and other loans. A home purchase loan may include a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit originated outside an institution's residential mortgage lending division, such as a loan or line of credit to purchase an apartment building originated in the commercial loan department.

3. Construction and permanent financing. A home purchase loan includes both a combined construction/permanent loan or line of credit, and the separate permanent financing that replaces a construction-only loan or line of credit for the same borrower at a later time. A home purchase loan does not include a construction-only loan or line of credit that is designed to be replaced by separate permanent financing extended by any financial institution to the same borrower at a later time or that is extended to a person exclusively to construct a dwelling for sale, which are excluded from Regulation C as temporary financing under §1003.3(c)(3). Comments 3(c)(3)-1 and -2 provide additional details about transactions that are excluded as temporary financing.

4. Second mortgages that finance the downpayments on first mortgages. If an institution making a first mortgage loan to a home purchaser also makes a second mortgage loan or line of credit to the same purchaser to finance part or all of the home purchaser's downpayment, both the first mortgage loan and the second mortgage loan or line of credit are home purchase loans.

5. Assumptions. Under §1003.2(j), an assumption is a home purchase loan when an institution enters into a written agreement accepting a new borrower as the obligor on an existing obligation to finance the new borrower's purchase of the dwelling securing the existing obligation, if the resulting obligation is a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit. A transaction in which borrower B finances the purchase of borrower A's dwelling by assuming borrower A's existing debt obligation and that is completed pursuant to a New York State consolidation, extension, and modification agreement and is classified as a supplemental mortgage under New York Tax Law section 255, such that the borrower owes reduced or no mortgage recording taxes, is an assumption and a home purchase loan. See comment 2(d)-2.ii. On the other hand, a transaction in which borrower B, a successor-in-interest, assumes borrower A's existing debt obligation only after acquiring title to borrower A's dwelling is not a home purchase loan because borrower B did not assume the debt obligation for the purpose of purchasing a dwelling. See §1003.4(a)(3) and comment 4(a)(3)-4 for guidance about how to report covered loans that are not home improvement loans, home purchase loans, or refinancings.

6. Multiple-purpose loans. A closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit may be used for multiple purposes. For example, a closed-end mortgage loan that is a home purchase loan under §1003.2(j) may also be a home improvement loan under §1003.2(i) and a refinancing under §1003.2(p) if the transaction is a cash-out refinancing and the funds will be used to purchase and improve a dwelling. Such a transaction is a multiple-purpose loan. Comment 4(a)(3)-3 provides details about how to report multiple-purpose covered loans.

2(l) Manufactured Home

1. Definition of a manufactured home. The definition in §1003.2(l) refers to the Federal building code for manufactured housing established by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) (24 CFR part 3280.2). Modular or other factory-built homes that do not meet the HUD code standards are not manufactured homes for purposes of §1003.2(l). Recreational vehicles are excluded from the HUD code standards pursuant to 24 CFR 3282.8(g) and are also excluded from the definition of dwelling for purposes of §1003.2(f). See comment 2(f)-3.

2. Identification. A manufactured home will generally bear a data plate affixed in a permanent manner near the main electrical panel or other readily accessible and visible location noting its compliance with the Federal Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards in force at the time of manufacture and providing other information about its manufacture pursuant to 24 CFR 3280.5. A manufactured home will generally also bear a HUD Certification Label pursuant to 24 CFR 3280.11.

2(m) Metropolitan Statistical Area (MD) or Metropolitan Division (MD).

1. Use of terms “Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)” and “Metropolitan Division (MD).” The U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) and Metropolitan Divisions (MDs) to provide nationally consistent definitions for collecting, tabulating, and publishing Federal statistics for a set of geographic areas. For all purposes under Regulation C, if an MSA is divided by OMB into MDs, the appropriate geographic unit to be used is the MD; if an MSA is not so divided by OMB into MDs, the appropriate geographic unit to be used is the MSA.

2(n) Multifamily Dwelling

1. Multifamily residential structures. The definition of dwelling in §1003.2(f) includes multifamily residential structures and the corresponding commentary provides guidance on when such residential structures are included in that definition. See comments 2(f)-2 through -5.

2. Special reporting requirements for multifamily dwellings. The definition of multifamily dwelling in §1003.2(n) includes a dwelling, regardless of construction method, that contains five or more individual dwelling units. Covered loans secured by a multifamily dwelling are subject to additional reporting requirements under §1003.4(a)(32), but are not subject to reporting requirements under §1003.4(a)(4), (10)(iii), (23), (29), or (30).

3. Separate dwellings. A covered loan secured by five or more separate dwellings, which are not multifamily dwellings, in more than one location is not a loan secured by a multifamily dwelling. For example, assume a landlord uses a covered loan to improve five or more dwellings, each with one individual dwelling unit, located in different parts of a town, and the loan is secured by those properties. The covered loan is not secured by a multifamily dwelling as defined by §1003.2(n). Likewise, a covered loan secured by five or more separate dwellings that are located within a multifamily dwelling, but which is not secured by the entire multifamily dwelling (e.g., an entire apartment building or housing complex), is not secured by a multifamily dwelling as defined by §1003.2(n). For example, assume that an investor purchases 10 individual unit condominiums in a 100-unit condominium complex using a covered loan. The covered loan would not be secured by a multifamily dwelling as defined by §1003.2(n). In both of these situations, a financial institution reporting a covered loan or application secured by these separate dwellings would not be subject to the additional reporting requirements for covered loans secured by or applications proposed to be secured by multifamily dwellings under §1003.4(a)(32). However, a financial institution would report the information required by §1003.4(a)(4), (a)(10)(iii), and (a)(23), (29), and (30), which is not applicable to covered loans secured by and applications proposed to be secured by multifamily dwellings. See comment 2(n)-2. In addition, in both of these situations, the financial institution reports the number of individual dwelling units securing the covered loan or proposed to secure a covered loan as required by §1003.4(a)(31). See comment 4(a)(31)-3.

2(o) Open-End Line of Credit

1. General. Section 1003.2(o) defines an open-end line of credit as an extension of credit that is secured by a lien on a dwelling and that is an open-end credit plan as defined in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.2(a)(20), but without regard to whether the credit is consumer credit, as defined in §1026.2(a)(12), is extended by a creditor, as defined in §1026.2(a)(17), or is extended to a consumer, as defined in §1026.2(a)(11). Aside from these distinctions, institutions may rely on 12 CFR 1026.2(a)(20) and its related commentary in determining whether a transaction is an open-end line of credit under §1003.2(o). For example, assume a business-purpose transaction that is exempt from Regulation Z pursuant to §1026.3(a)(1) but that otherwise is open-end credit under Regulation Z §1026.2(a)(20). The business-purpose transaction is an open-end line of credit under Regulation C, provided the other requirements of §1003.2(o) are met. Similarly, assume a transaction in which the person extending open-end credit is a financial institution under §1003.2(g) but is not a creditor under Regulation Z, §1026.2(a)(17). In this example, the transaction is an open-end line of credit under Regulation C, provided the other requirements of §1003.2(o) are met.

2. Extension of credit. Extension of credit has the same meaning under §1003.2(o) as under §1003.2(d) and comment 2(d)-2. Thus, for example, a renewal of an open-end line of credit is not an extension of credit under §1003.2(o) and is not covered by Regulation C unless the existing debt obligation is satisfied and replaced. Likewise, under §1003.2(o), each draw on an open-end line of credit is not an extension of credit.

2(p) Refinancing

1. General. Section 1003.2(p) defines a refinancing as a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit in which a new, dwelling-secured debt obligation satisfies and replaces an existing, dwelling-secured debt obligation by the same borrower. Except as described in comment 2(p)-2, whether a refinancing has occurred is determined by reference to whether, based on the parties' contract and applicable law, the original debt obligation has been satisfied or replaced by a new debt obligation. Whether the original lien is satisfied is irrelevant. For example:

i. A new closed-end mortgage loan that satisfies and replaces one or more existing closed-end mortgage loans is a refinancing under §1003.2(p).

ii. A new open-end line of credit that satisfies and replaces an existing closed-end mortgage loan is a refinancing under §1003.2(p).

iii. Except as described in comment 2(p)-2, a new debt obligation that renews or modifies the terms of, but that does not satisfy and replace, an existing debt obligation, is not a refinancing under §1003.2(p).

2. New York State consolidation, extension, and modification agreements. Where a transaction is completed pursuant to a New York State consolidation, extension, and modification agreement and is classified as a supplemental mortgage under New York Tax Law section§255, such that the borrower owes reduced or no mortgage recording taxes, and where, but for the agreement, the transaction would have met the definition of a refinancing under §1003.2(p), the transaction is considered a refinancing under §1003.2(p). See also comment 2(d)-2.ii.

3. Existing debt obligation. A closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit that satisfies and replaces one or more existing debt obligations is not a refinancing under §1003.2(p) unless the existing debt obligation (or obligations) also was secured by a dwelling. For example, assume that a borrower has an existing $30,000 closed-end mortgage loan and obtains a new $50,000 closed-end mortgage loan that satisfies and replaces the existing $30,000 loan. The new $50,000 loan is a refinancing under §1003.2(p). However, if the borrower obtains a new $50,000 closed-end mortgage loan that satisfies and replaces an existing $30,000 loan secured only by a personal guarantee, the new $50,000 loan is not a refinancing under §1003.2(p). See §1003.4(a)(3) and related commentary for guidance about how to report the loan purpose of such transactions, if they are not otherwise excluded under §1003.3(c).

4. Same borrower. Section 1003.2(p) provides that, even if all of the other requirements of §1003.2(p) are met, a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit is not a refinancing unless the same borrower undertakes both the existing and the new obligation(s). Under §1003.2(p), the “same borrower” undertakes both the existing and the new obligation(s) even if only one borrower is the same on both obligations. For example, assume that an existing closed-end mortgage loan (obligation X) is satisfied and replaced by a new closed-end mortgage loan (obligation Y). If borrowers A and B both are obligated on obligation X, and only borrower B is obligated on obligation Y, then obligation Y is a refinancing under §1003.2(p), assuming the other requirements of §1003.2(p) are met, because borrower B is obligated on both transactions. On the other hand, if only borrower A is obligated on obligation X, and only borrower B is obligated on obligation Y, then obligation Y is not a refinancing under §1003.2(p). For example, assume that two spouses are divorcing. If both spouses are obligated on obligation X, but only one spouse is obligated on obligation Y, then obligation Y is a refinancing under §1003.2(p), assuming the other requirements of §1003.2(p) are met. On the other hand, if only spouse A is obligated on obligation X, and only spouse B is obligated on obligation Y, then obligation Y is not a refinancing under §1003.2(p). See §1003.4(a)(3) and related commentary for guidance about how to report the loan purpose of such transactions, if they are not otherwise excluded under §1003.3(c).

5. Two or more debt obligations. Section 1003.2(p) provides that, to be a refinancing, a new debt obligation must satisfy and replace an existing debt obligation. Where two or more new obligations replace an existing obligation, each new obligation is a refinancing if, taken together, the new obligations satisfy the existing obligation. Similarly, where one new obligation replaces two or more existing obligations, the new obligation is a refinancing if it satisfies each of the existing obligations.

6. Multiple-purpose loans. A closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit may be used for multiple purposes. For example, a closed-end mortgage loan that is a refinancing under §1003.2(p) may also be a home improvement loan under §1003.2(i) and be used for other purposes if the refinancing is a cash-out refinancing and the funds will be used both for home improvement and to pay college tuition. Such a transaction is a multiple-purpose loan. Comment 4(a)(3)-3 provides details about how to report multiple-purpose covered loans.

Section 1003.3—Exempt Institutions and Excluded Transactions

3(c) Excluded Transactions

Paragraph 3(c)(1)

1. Financial institution acting in a fiduciary capacity. Section 1003.3(c)(1) provides that a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit originated or purchased by a financial institution acting in a fiduciary capacity is an excluded transaction. A financial institution acts in a fiduciary capacity if, for example, the financial institution acts as a trustee.

Paragraph 3(c)(2)

1. Loan or line of credit secured by a lien on unimproved land. Section 1003.3(c)(2) provides that a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit secured by a lien on unimproved land is an excluded transaction. A loan or line of credit is secured by a lien on unimproved land if the loan or line of credit is secured by vacant or unimproved property, unless the institution knows, based on information that it receives from the applicant or borrower at the time the application is received or the credit decision is made, that the proceeds of that loan or credit line will be used within two years after closing or account opening to construct a dwelling on, or to purchase a dwelling to be placed on, the land. A loan or line of credit that is not excludable under §1003.3(c)(2) nevertheless may be excluded, for example, as temporary financing under §1003.3(c)(3).

Paragraph 3(c)(3)

1. Temporary financing. Section 1003.3(c)(3) provides that closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit obtained for temporary financing are excluded transactions. A loan or line of credit is considered temporary financing and excluded under §1003.3(c)(3) if the loan or line of credit is designed to be replaced by separate permanent financing extended by any financial institution to the same borrower at a later time. For example:

i. Lender A extends credit in the form of a bridge or swing loan to finance a borrower's down payment on a home purchase. The borrower pays off the bridge or swing loan with funds from the sale of his or her existing home and obtains permanent financing for his or her new home from Lender A or from another lender. The bridge or swing loan is excluded as temporary financing under §1003.3(c)(3).

ii. Lender A extends credit to a borrower to finance construction of a dwelling. The borrower will obtain a new extension of credit for permanent financing for the dwelling, either from Lender A or from another lender, and either through a refinancing of the initial construction loan or a separate loan. The initial construction loan is excluded as temporary financing under §1003.3(c)(3).

iii. Assume the same scenario as in comment 3(c)(3)-1.ii, except that the initial construction loan is, or may be, renewed one or more times before the separate permanent financing is obtained. The initial construction loan, including any renewal thereof, is excluded as temporary financing under §1003.3(c)(3).

iv. Lender A extends credit to finance construction of a dwelling. The loan automatically will convert to permanent financing extended to the same borrower with Lender A once the construction phase is complete. Under §1003.3(c)(3), the loan is not designed to be replaced by separate permanent financing extended to the same borrower, and therefore the temporary financing exclusion does not apply. See also comment 2(j)-3.

v. Lender A originates a loan with a nine-month term to enable an investor to purchase a home, renovate it, and re-sell it before the term expires. Under §1003.3(c)(3), the loan is not designed to be replaced by separate permanent financing extended to the same borrower, and therefore the temporary financing exclusion does not apply. Such a transaction is not temporary financing under §1003.3(c)(3) merely because its term is short.

2. Loan or line of credit to construct a dwelling for sale. A construction-only loan or line of credit is considered temporary financing and excluded under §1003.3(c)(3) if the loan or line of credit is extended to a person exclusively to construct a dwelling for sale. See comment 3(c)(3)-1.ii through .iv for examples of the reporting requirement for construction loans that are not extended to a person exclusively to construct a dwelling for sale.

Paragraph 3(c)(4)

1. Purchase of an interest in a pool of loans. Section 1003.3(c)(4) provides that the purchase of an interest in a pool of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit is an excluded transaction. The purchase of an interest in a pool of loans or lines of credit includes, for example, mortgage-participation certificates, mortgage-backed securities, or real estate mortgage investment conduits.

Paragraph 3(c)(6)

1. Mergers and acquisitions. Section 1003.3(c)(6) provides that the purchase of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit as part of a merger or acquisition, or as part of the acquisition of all of the assets and liabilities of a branch office, are excluded transactions. If a financial institution acquires loans or lines of credit in bulk from another institution (for example, from the receiver for a failed institution), but no merger or acquisition of an institution, or acquisition of a branch office, is involved and no other exclusion applies, the acquired loans or lines of credit are covered loans and are reported as described in comment 4(a)-1.iii.

Paragraph 3(c)(8)

1. Partial interest. Section 1003.3(c)(8) provides that the purchase of a partial interest in a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit is an excluded transaction. If an institution acquires only a partial interest in a loan or line of credit, the institution does not report the transaction even if the institution participated in the underwriting and origination of the loan or line of credit. If an institution acquires a 100 percent interest in a loan or line of credit, the transaction is not excluded under §1003.3(c)(8).

Paragraph 3(c)(9)

1. Loan or line of credit used primarily for agricultural purposes. Section 1003.3(c)(9) provides that an institution does not report a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit used primarily for agricultural purposes. A loan or line of credit is used primarily for agricultural purposes if its funds will be used primarily for agricultural purposes, or if the loan or line of credit is secured by a dwelling that is located on real property that is used primarily for agricultural purposes (e.g., a farm). An institution may refer to comment 3(a)-8 in the official interpretations of Regulation Z, 12 CFR part 1026, supplement I, for guidance on what is an agricultural purpose. An institution may use any reasonable standard to determine the primary use of the property. An institution may select the standard to apply on a case-by-case basis.

Paragraph 3(c)(10)

1. General. Section 1003.3(c)(10) provides a special rule for reporting a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit that is or will be made primarily for a business or commercial purpose. If an institution determines that a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit primarily is for a business or commercial purpose, then the loan or line of credit is a covered loan only if it is a home improvement loan under §1003.2(i), a home purchase loan under §1003.2(j), or a refinancing under §1003.2(p) and no other exclusion applies. Section 1003.3(c)(10) does not categorically exclude all business- or commercial-purpose loans and lines of credit from coverage.

2. Primary purpose. An institution must determine in each case if a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit primarily is for a business or commercial purpose. If a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit is deemed to be primarily for a business, commercial, or organizational purpose under Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.3(a) and its related commentary, then the loan or line of credit also is deemed to be primarily for a business or commercial purpose under §1003.3(c)(10).

3. Examples—covered business- or commercial-purpose transactions. The following are examples of closed-end mortgage loans and open-end lines of credit that are not excluded from reporting under §1003.3(c)(10) because, although they primarily are for a business or commercial purpose, they also meet the definition of a home improvement loan under §1003.2(i), a home purchase loan under §1003.2(j), or a refinancing under §1003.2(p):

i. A closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit to purchase or to improve a multifamily dwelling or a single-family investment property, or a refinancing of a closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit secured by a multifamily dwelling or a single-family investment property;

ii. A closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit to improve a doctor's office or a daycare center that is located in a dwelling other than a multifamily dwelling; and

iii. A closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit to a corporation, if the funds from the loan or line of credit will be used to purchase or to improve a dwelling, or if the transaction is a refinancing.

4. Examples—excluded business- or commercial-purpose transactions. The following are examples of closed-end mortgage loans and open-end lines of credit that are not covered loans because they primarily are for a business or commercial purpose, but they do not meet the definition of a home improvement loan under §1003.2(i), a home purchase loan under §1003.2(j), or a refinancing under §1003.2(p):

i. A closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit whose funds will be used primarily to improve or expand a business, for example to renovate a family restaurant that is not located in a dwelling, or to purchase a warehouse, business equipment, or inventory;

ii. A closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit to a corporation whose funds will be used primarily for business purposes, such as to purchase inventory; and

iii. A closed-end mortgage loan or an open-end line of credit whose funds will be used primarily for business or commercial purposes other than home purchase, home improvement, or refinancing, even if the loan or line of credit is cross-collateralized by a covered loan.

Paragraph 3(c)(11)

1. General. Section 1003.3(c)(11) provides that a closed-end mortgage loan is an excluded transaction if a financial institution originated fewer than 25 closed-end mortgage loans in either of the two preceding calendar years. For example, assume that a bank is a financial institution in 2018 under §1003.2(g) because it originated 600 open-end lines of credit in 2016, 650 open-end lines of credit in 2017, and met all of the other requirements under §1003.2(g)(1). Also assume that the bank originated 10 and 20 closed-end mortgage loans in 2016 and 2017, respectively. The open-end lines of credit that the bank originated or purchased, or for which it received applications, during 2018 are covered loans and must be reported, unless they otherwise are excluded transactions under §1003.3(c). However, the closed-end mortgage loans that the bank originated or purchased, or for which it received applications, during 2018 are excluded transactions under §1003.3(c)(11) and need not be reported. See comments 4(a)-2 through -4 for guidance about the activities that constitute an origination.

2. Optional reporting. A financial institution may report applications for, originations of, or purchases of closed-end mortgage loans that are excluded transactions because the financial institution originated fewer than 25 closed-end mortgage loans in either of the two preceding calendar years. However, a financial institution that chooses to report such excluded applications for, originations of, or purchases of closed-end mortgage loans must report all such applications for closed-end mortgage loans that it receives, closed-end mortgage loans that it originates, and closed-end mortgage loans that it purchases that otherwise would be covered loans for a given calendar year. Note that applications which remain pending at the end of a calendar year are not reported, as described in comment 4(a)(8)(i)-14.

Paragraph 3(c)(12)

1. General. Section 1003.3(c)(12) provides that an open-end line of credit is an excluded transaction if a financial institution originated fewer than 500 open-end lines of credit in either of the two preceding calendar years. For example, assume that a bank is a financial institution in 2018 under §1003.2(g) because it originated 50 closed-end mortgage loans in 2016, 75 closed-end mortgage loans in 2017, and met all of the other requirements under §1003.2(g)(1). Also assume that the bank originated 75 and 85 open-end lines of credit in 2016 and 2017, respectively. The closed-end mortgage loans that the bank originated or purchased, or for which it received applications, during 2018 are covered loans and must be reported, unless they otherwise are excluded transactions under §1003.3(c). However, the open-end lines of credit that the bank originated or purchased, or for which it received applications, during 2018 are excluded transactions under §1003.3(c)(12) and need not be reported. See comments 4(a)-2 through -4 for guidance about the activities that constitute an origination.

2. Optional reporting. A financial institution may report applications for, originations of, or purchases of open-end lines of credit that are excluded transactions because the financial institution originated fewer than 500 open-end lines of credit in either of the two preceding calendar years. However, a financial institution that chooses to report such excluded applications for, originations of, or purchases of open-end lines of credit must report all such applications for open-end lines of credit on which it receives, open-end lines of credit that it originates, and open-end lines of credit that it purchases that otherwise would be covered loans for a given calendar year. Note that applications which remain pending at the end of a calendar year are not reported, as described in comment 4(a)(8)(i)-14.

Paragraph 3(c)(13)

1. New funds extended before consolidation. Section 1003.3(c)(13) provides an exclusion for a transaction that provided or, in the case of an application, proposed to provide new funds to the borrower in advance of being consolidated in a New York State consolidation, extension, and modification agreement classified as a supplemental mortgage under New York Tax Law section 255 (New York CEMA) and for which final action is taken on both transactions within the same calendar year. The excluded transaction provides or proposes to provide funds that are not part of any existing debt obligation of the borrower and that are then consolidated or proposed to be consolidated with an existing debt obligation or obligations as part of the supplemental mortgage. The new funds are reported only insofar as they form part of the total amount of the reported New York CEMA, and not as a separate amount. This exclusion applies only if, at the time the transaction that provided new funds was originated, the financial institution intended to consolidate the loan into a New York CEMA. If a New York CEMA that consolidates an excluded preliminary transaction is carried out in a transaction involving an assumption, the financial institution reports the New York CEMA and does not report the preliminary transaction separately. The §1003.3(c)(13) exclusion does not apply to similar preliminary transactions that provide or propose to provide new funds to be consolidated not pursuant to New York Tax Law section 255 but under some other law in a transaction that is not an extension of credit. For example, assume a financial institution extends new funds to a consumer in a preliminary transaction that is then consolidated as part of a consolidation, extension and modification agreement pursuant to the law of a State other than New York. If the preliminary extension of new funds is a covered loan, it must be reported. If the consolidation, extension and modification agreement pursuant to the law of a State other than New York is not an extension of credit pursuant to Regulation C, it may not be reported. For discussion of how to report a cash-out refinancing, see comment 4(a)(3)-2.

Section 1003.4—Compilation of Reportable Data

4(a) Data Format and Itemization

1. General. Section 1003.4(a) describes a financial institution's obligation to collect data on applications it received, on covered loans that it originated, and on covered loans that it purchased during the calendar year covered by the loan/application register.

i. A financial institution reports these data even if the covered loans were subsequently sold by the institution.

ii. A financial institution reports data for applications that did not result in an origination but on which actions were taken-for example, an application that the institution denied, that it approved but that was not accepted, that it closed for incompleteness, or that the applicant withdrew during the calendar year covered by the loan/application register. A financial institution is required to report data regarding requests under a preapproval program (as defined in §1003.2(b)(2)) only if the preapproval request is denied, results in the origination of a home purchase loan, or was approved but not accepted.

iii. If a financial institution acquires covered loans in bulk from another institution (for example, from the receiver for a failed institution), but no merger or acquisition of an institution, or acquisition of a branch office, is involved, the acquiring financial institution reports the covered loans as purchased loans.

iv. A financial institution reports the data for an application on the loan/application register for the calendar year during which the application was acted upon even if the institution received the application in a previous calendar year.

2. Originations and applications involving more than one institution. Section 1003.4(a) requires a financial institution to collect certain information regarding applications for covered loans that it receives and regarding covered loans that it originates. The following provides guidance on how to report originations and applications involving more than one institution. The discussion below assumes that all of the parties are financial institutions as defined by §1003.2(g). The same principles apply if any of the parties is not a financial institution. Comment 4(a)-3 provides examples of transactions involving more than one institution, and comment 4(a)-4 discusses how to report actions taken by agents.

i. Only one financial institution reports each originated covered loan as an origination. If more than one institution was involved in the origination of a covered loan, the financial institution that made the credit decision approving the application before closing or account opening reports the loan as an origination. It is not relevant whether the loan closed or, in the case of an application, would have closed in the institution's name. If more than one institution approved an application prior to closing or account opening and one of those institutions purchased the loan after closing, the institution that purchased the loan after closing reports the loan as an origination. If a financial institution reports a transaction as an origination, it reports all of the information required for originations, even if the covered loan was not initially payable to the financial institution that is reporting the covered loan as an origination.

ii. In the case of an application for a covered loan that did not result in an origination, a financial institution reports the action it took on that application if it made a credit decision on the application or was reviewing the application when the application was withdrawn or closed for incompleteness. It is not relevant whether the financial institution received the application from the applicant or from another institution, such as a broker, or whether another financial institution also reviewed and reported an action taken on the same application.

3. Examples—originations and applications involving more than one institution. The following scenarios illustrate how an institution reports a particular application or covered loan. The illustrations assume that all of the parties are financial institutions as defined by §1003.2(g). However, the same principles apply if any of the parties is not a financial institution.

i. Financial Institution A received an application for a covered loan from an applicant and forwarded that application to Financial Institution B. Financial Institution B reviewed the application and approved the loan prior to closing. The loan closed in Financial Institution A's name. Financial Institution B purchased the loan from Financial Institution A after closing. Financial Institution B was not acting as Financial Institution A's agent. Since Financial Institution B made the credit decision prior to closing, Financial Institution B reports the transaction as an origination, not as a purchase. Financial Institution A does not report the transaction.

ii. Financial Institution A received an application for a covered loan from an applicant and forwarded that application to Financial Institution B. Financial Institution B reviewed the application before the loan would have closed, but the application did not result in an origination because Financial Institution B denied the application. Financial Institution B was not acting as Financial Institution A's agent. Since Financial Institution B made the credit decision, Financial Institution B reports the application as a denial. Financial Institution A does not report the application. If, under the same facts, the application was withdrawn before Financial Institution B made a credit decision, Financial Institution B would report the application as withdrawn and Financial Institution A would not report the application.

iii. Financial Institution A received an application for a covered loan from an applicant and approved the application before closing the loan in its name. Financial Institution A was not acting as Financial Institution B's agent. Financial Institution B purchased the covered loan from Financial Institution A. Financial Institution B did not review the application before closing. Financial Institution A reports the loan as an origination. Financial Institution B reports the loan as a purchase.

iv. Financial Institution A received an application for a covered loan from an applicant. If approved, the loan would have closed in Financial Institution B's name. Financial Institution A denied the application without sending it to Financial Institution B for approval. Financial Institution A was not acting as Financial Institution B's agent. Since Financial Institution A made the credit decision before the loan would have closed, Financial Institution A reports the application. Financial Institution B does not report the application.

v. Financial Institution A reviewed an application and made the credit decision to approve a covered loan using the underwriting criteria provided by a third party (e.g., another financial institution, Fannie Mae, or Freddie Mac). The third party did not review the application and did not make a credit decision prior to closing. Financial Institution A was not acting as the third party's agent. Financial Institution A reports the application or origination. If the third party purchased the loan and is subject to Regulation C, the third party reports the loan as a purchase whether or not the third party reviewed the loan after closing. Assume the same facts, except that Financial Institution A approved the application, and the applicant chose not to accept the loan from Financial Institution A. Financial Institution A reports the application as approved but not accepted and the third party, assuming the third party is subject to Regulation C, does not report the application.

vi. Financial Institution A reviewed and made the credit decision on an application based on the criteria of a third-party insurer or guarantor (for example, a government or private insurer or guarantor). Financial Institution A reports the action taken on the application.

vii. Financial Institution A received an application for a covered loan and forwarded it to Financial Institutions B and C. Financial Institution A made a credit decision, acting as Financial Institution D's agent, and approved the application. The applicant did not accept the loan from Financial Institution D. Financial Institution D reports the application as approved but not accepted. Financial Institution A does not report the application. Financial Institution B made a credit decision, approving the application, the applicant accepted the offer of credit from Financial Institution B, and credit was extended. Financial Institution B reports the origination. Financial Institution C made a credit decision and denied the application. Financial Institution C reports the application as denied.

4. Agents. If a financial institution made the credit decision on a covered loan or application through the actions of an agent, the institution reports the application or origination. State law determines whether one party is the agent of another. For example, acting as Financial Institution A's agent, Financial Institution B approved an application prior to closing and a covered loan was originated. Financial Institution A reports the loan as an origination.

5. Purchased loans. i. A financial institution is required to collect data regarding covered loans it purchases. For purposes of §1003.4(a), a purchase includes a repurchase of a covered loan, regardless of whether the institution chose to repurchase the covered loan or was required to repurchase the covered loan because of a contractual obligation and regardless of whether the repurchase occurs within the same calendar year that the covered loan was originated or in a different calendar year. For example, assume that Financial Institution A originates or purchases a covered loan and then sells it to Financial Institution B, who later requires Financial Institution A to repurchase the covered loan pursuant to the relevant contractual obligations. Financial Institution B reports the purchase from Financial Institution A, assuming it is a financial institution as defined under §1003.2(g). Financial Institution A reports the repurchase from Financial Institution B as a purchase.

ii. In contrast, for purposes of §1003.4(a), a purchase does not include a temporary transfer of a covered loan to an interim funder or warehouse creditor as part of an interim funding agreement under which the originating financial institution is obligated to repurchase the covered loan for sale to a subsequent investor. Such agreements, often referred to as “repurchase agreements,” are sometimes employed as functional equivalents of warehouse lines of credit. Under these agreements, the interim funder or warehouse creditor acquires legal title to the covered loan, subject to an obligation of the originating institution to repurchase at a future date, rather than taking a security interest in the covered loan as under the terms of a more conventional warehouse line of credit. To illustrate, assume Financial Institution A has an interim funding agreement with Financial Institution B to enable Financial Institution B to originate loans. Assume further that Financial Institution B originates a covered loan and that, pursuant to this agreement, Financial Institution A takes a temporary transfer of the covered loan until Financial Institution B arranges for the sale of the covered loan to a subsequent investor and that Financial Institution B repurchases the covered loan to enable it to complete the sale to the subsequent investor (alternatively, Financial Institution A may transfer the covered loan directly to the subsequent investor at Financial Institution B's direction, pursuant to the interim funding agreement). The subsequent investor could be, for example, a financial institution or other entity that intends to hold the loan in portfolio, a GSE or other securitizer, or a financial institution or other entity that intends to package and sell multiple loans to a GSE or other securitizer. In this example, the temporary transfer of the covered loan from Financial Institution B to Financial Institution A is not a purchase, and any subsequent transfer back to Financial Institution B for delivery to the subsequent investor is not a purchase, for purposes of §1003.4(a). Financial Institution B reports the origination of the covered loan as well as its sale to the subsequent investor. If the subsequent investor is a financial institution under §1003.2(g), it reports a purchase of the covered loan pursuant to §1003.4(a), regardless of whether it acquired the covered loan from Financial Institution B or directly from Financial Institution A.

Paragraph 4(a)(1)(i)

1. ULI—uniqueness. Section 1003.4(a)(1)(i)(B)(2) requires a financial institution that assigns a universal loan identifier (ULI) to each covered loan or application (except as provided in §1003.4(a)(1)(i)(D) and (E)) to ensure that the character sequence it assigns is unique within the institution and used only for the covered loan or application. A financial institution should assign only one ULI to any particular covered loan or application, and each ULI should correspond to a single application and ensuing loan in the case that the application is approved and a loan is originated. A financial institution may use a ULI that was reported previously to refer only to the same loan or application for which the ULI was used previously or a loan that ensues from an application for which the ULI was used previously. A financial institution may not report an application for a covered loan in 2030 using the same ULI that was reported for a covered loan that was originated in 2020. Similarly, refinancings or applications for refinancing should be assigned a different ULI than the loan that is being refinanced. A financial institution with multiple branches must ensure that its branches do not use the same ULI to refer to multiple covered loans or applications.

2. ULI—privacy. Section 1003.4(a)(1)(i)(B)(3) prohibits a financial institution from including information that could be used to directly identify the applicant or borrower in the identifier that it assigns for the application or covered loan of the applicant or borrower. Information that could be used to directly identify the applicant or borrower includes, but is not limited to, the applicant's or borrower's name, date of birth, Social Security number, official government-issued driver's license or identification number, alien registration number, government passport number, or employer or taxpayer identification number.

3. ULI—purchased covered loan. If a financial institution has previously assigned a covered loan with a ULI or reported a covered loan with a ULI under this part, a financial institution that purchases that covered loan must report the same ULI that was previously assigned or reported. For example, if a loan origination previously was reported under this part with a ULI, the financial institution that purchases the covered loan would report the purchase of the covered loan using the same ULI. A financial institution that purchases a covered loan must use the ULI that was assigned by the financial institution that originated the covered loan. A financial institution that purchases a covered loan assigns a ULI and records and submits it in its loan/application register pursuant to §1003.5(a)(1) if the covered loan was not assigned a ULI by the financial institution that originated the loan because, for example, the loan was originated prior to January 1, 2018, or the loan was originated by an institution not required to report under this part.

4. ULI—reinstated or reconsidered application. A financial institution may not use a ULI previously reported if it reinstates or reconsiders an application that was reported in a prior calendar year. For example, if a financial institution reports a denied application in its annual 2020 data submission, pursuant to §1003.5(a)(1), but then reconsiders the application, resulting in an origination in 2021, the financial institution reports a denied application under the original ULI in its annual 2020 data submission and an origination with a different ULI in its annual 2021 data submission, pursuant to §1003.5(a)(1).

5. ULI—check digit. Section 1003.(4)(a)(1)(i)(C) requires that the two right-most characters in the ULI represent the check digit. Appendix C prescribes the requirements for generating a check digit and validating a ULI.

Paragraph 4(a)(1)(ii)

1. Application date—consistency. Section 1003.4(a)(1)(ii) requires that, in reporting the date of application, a financial institution report the date it received the application, as defined under §1003.2(b), or the date shown on the application form. Although a financial institution need not choose the same approach for its entire HMDA submission, it should be generally consistent (such as by routinely using one approach within a particular division of the institution or for a category of loans). If the financial institution chooses to report the date shown on the application form and the institution retains multiple versions of the application form, the institution reports the date shown on the first application form satisfying the application definition provided under §1003.2(b).

2. Application date—indirect application. For an application that was not submitted directly to the financial institution, the institution may report the date the application was received by the party that initially received the application, the date the application was received by the institution, or the date shown on the application form. Although an institution need not choose the same approach for its entire HMDA submission, it should be generally consistent (such as by routinely using one approach within a particular division of the institution or for a category of loans).

3. Application date—reinstated application. If, within the same calendar year, an applicant asks a financial institution to reinstate a counteroffer that the applicant previously did not accept (or asks the institution to reconsider an application that was denied, withdrawn, or closed for incompleteness), the institution may treat that request as the continuation of the earlier transaction using the same ULI or as a new transaction with a new ULI. If the institution treats the request for reinstatement or reconsideration as a new transaction, it reports the date of the request as the application date. If the institution does not treat the request for reinstatement or reconsideration as a new transaction, it reports the original application date.

Paragraph 4(a)(2)

1. Loan type—general. If a covered loan is not, or in the case of an application would not have been, insured by the Federal Housing Administration, guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs, or guaranteed by the Rural Housing Service or the Farm Service Agency, an institution complies with §1003.4(a)(2) by reporting the covered loan as not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Housing Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs, Rural Housing Service, or Farm Service Agency.

Paragraph 4(a)(3)

1. Purpose—statement of applicant. A financial institution may rely on the oral or written statement of an applicant regarding the proposed use of covered loan proceeds. For example, a lender could use a check-box or a purpose line on a loan application to determine whether the applicant intends to use covered loan proceeds for home improvement purposes. If an applicant provides no statement as to the proposed use of covered loan proceeds and the covered loan is not a home purchase loan, cash-out refinancing, or refinancing, a financial institution reports the covered loan as for a purpose other than home purchase, home improvement, refinancing, or cash-out refinancing for purposes of §1003.4(a)(3).

2. Purpose—refinancing and cash-out refinancing. Section 1003.4(a)(3) requires a financial institution to report whether a covered loan is, or an application is for, a refinancing or a cash-out refinancing. A financial institution reports a covered loan or an application as a cash-out refinancing if it is a refinancing as defined by §1003.2(p) and the institution considered it to be a cash-out refinancing in processing the application or setting the terms (such as the interest rate or origination charges) under its guidelines or an investor's guidelines. For example:

i. Assume a financial institution considers an application for a loan product to be a cash-out refinancing under an investor's guidelines because of the amount of cash received by the borrower at closing or account opening. Assume also that under the investor's guidelines, the applicant qualifies for the loan product and the financial institution approves the application, originates the covered loan, and sets the terms of the covered loan consistent with the loan product. In this example, the financial institution would report the covered loan as a cash-out refinancing for purposes of §1003.4(a)(3).

ii. Assume a financial institution does not consider an application for a covered loan to be a cash-out refinancing under its own guidelines because the amount of cash received by the borrower does not exceed a certain threshold. Assume also that the institution approves the application, originates the covered loan, and sets the terms of the covered loan consistent with its own guidelines applicable to refinancings other than cash-out refinancings. In this example, the financial institution would report the covered loan as a refinancing for purposes of §1003.4(a)(3).

iii. Assume a financial institution does not distinguish between a cash-out refinancing and a refinancing under its own guidelines, and sets the terms of all refinancings without regard to the amount of cash received by the borrower at closing or account opening, and does not offer loan products under investor guidelines. In this example, the financial institution reports all covered loans and applications for covered loans that are defined by §1003.2(p) as refinancings for purposes of §1003.4(a)(3).

3. Purpose—multiple-purpose loan. Section 1003.4(a)(3) requires a financial institution to report the purpose of a covered loan or application. If a covered loan is a home purchase loan as well as a home improvement loan, a refinancing, or a cash-out refinancing, an institution complies with §1003.4(a)(3) by reporting the loan as a home purchase loan. If a covered loan is a home improvement loan as well as a refinancing or cash-out refinancing, but the covered loan is not a home purchase loan, an institution complies with §1003.4(a)(3) by reporting the covered loan as a refinancing or a cash-out refinancing, as appropriate. If a covered loan is a refinancing or cash-out refinancing as well as for another purpose, such as for the purpose of paying educational expenses, but the covered loan is not a home purchase loan, an institution complies with §1003.4(a)(3) by reporting the covered loan as a refinancing or a cash-out refinancing, as appropriate. See comment 4(a)(3)-2. If a covered loan is a home improvement loan as well as for another purpose, but the covered loan is not a home purchase loan, a refinancing, or cash-out refinancing, an institution complies with §1003.4(a)(3) by reporting the covered loan as a home improvement loan. See comment 2(i)-1.

4. Purpose—other. If a covered loan is not, or an application is not for, a home purchase loan, a home improvement loan, a refinancing, or a cash-out refinancing, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(3) by reporting the covered loan or application as for a purpose other than home purchase, home improvement, refinancing, or cash-out refinancing. For example, if a covered loan is for the purpose of paying educational expenses, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(3) by reporting the covered loan as for a purpose other than home purchase, home improvement, refinancing, or cash-out refinancing. Section 1003.4(a)(3) also requires an institution to report a covered loan or application as for a purpose other than home purchase, home improvement, refinancing, or cash-out refinancing if it is a refinancing but, under the terms of the agreement, the financial institution was unconditionally obligated to refinance the obligation subject to conditions within the borrower's control.

5. Purpose—business or commercial purpose loans. If a covered loan primarily is for a business or commercial purpose as described in §1003.3(c)(10) and comment 3(c)(10)-2 and is a home purchase loan, home improvement loan, or a refinancing, §1003.4(a)(3) requires the financial institution to report the applicable loan purpose. If a loan primarily is for a business or commercial purpose but is not a home purchase loan, home improvement loan, or a refinancing, the loan is an excluded transaction under §1003.3(c)(10).

6. Purpose—purchased loans. For purchased covered loans where origination took place prior to January 1, 2018, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(3) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable.

Paragraph 4(a)(4)

1. Request under a preapproval program. Section 1003.4(a)(4) requires a financial institution to report whether an application or covered loan involved a request for a preapproval of a home purchase loan under a preapproval program as defined by §1003.2(b)(2). If an application or covered loan did not involve a request for a preapproval of a home purchase loan under a preapproval program as defined by §1003.2(b)(2), a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(4) by reporting that the application or covered loan did not involve such a request, regardless of whether the institution has such a program and the applicant did not apply through that program or the institution does not have a preapproval program as defined by §1003.2(b)(2).

2. Scope of requirement. A financial institution reports that the application or covered loan did not involve a preapproval request for a purchased covered loan; an application or covered loan for any purpose other than a home purchase loan; an application for a home purchase loan or a covered loan that is a home purchase loan secured by a multifamily dwelling; an application or covered loan that is an open-end line of credit or a reverse mortgage; or an application that is denied, withdrawn by the applicant, or closed for incompleteness.

Paragraph 4(a)(5)

1. Modular homes and prefabricated components. Covered loans or applications related to modular homes should be reported with a construction method of site-built, regardless of whether they are on-frame or off-frame modular homes. Modular homes comply with local or other recognized buildings codes rather than standards established by the National Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards Act, 42 U.S.C. 5401 et seq. Modular homes are not required to have HUD Certification Labels under 24 CFR 3280.11 or data plates under 24 CFR 3280.5. Modular homes may have a certification from a State licensing agency that documents compliance with State or other applicable building codes. On-frame modular homes are constructed on permanent metal chassis similar to those used in manufactured homes. The chassis are not removed on site and are secured to the foundation. Off-frame modular homes typically have floor construction similar to the construction of other site-built homes, and the construction typically includes wooden floor joists and does not include permanent metal chassis. Dwellings built using prefabricated components assembled at the dwelling's permanent site should also be reported with a construction method of site-built.

2. Multifamily dwelling. For a covered loan or an application for a covered loan related to a multifamily dwelling, the financial institution should report the construction method as site-built unless the multifamily dwelling is a manufactured home community, in which case the financial institution should report the construction method as manufactured home.

3. Multiple properties. See comment 4(a)(9)-2 regarding transactions involving multiple properties with more than one property taken as security.

Paragraph 4(a)(6)

1. Multiple properties. See comment 4(a)(9)-2 regarding transactions involving multiple properties with more than one property taken as security.

2. Principal residence. Section 1003.4(a)(6) requires a financial institution to identify whether the property to which the covered loan or application relates is or will be used as a residence that the applicant or borrower physically occupies and uses, or will occupy and use, as his or her principal residence. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(6), an applicant or borrower can have only one principal residence at a time. Thus, a vacation or other second home would not be a principal residence. However, if an applicant or borrower buys or builds a new dwelling that will become the applicant's or borrower's principal residence within a year or upon the completion of construction, the new dwelling is considered the principal residence for purposes of applying this definition to a particular transaction.

3. Second residences. Section 1003.4(a)(6) requires a financial institution to identify whether the property to which the loan or application relates is or will be used as a second residence. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(6), a property is a second residence of an applicant or borrower if the property is or will be occupied by the applicant or borrower for a portion of the year and is not the applicant's or borrower's principal residence. For example, if a person purchases a property, occupies the property for a portion of the year, and rents the property for the remainder of the year, the property is a second residence for purposes of §1003.4(a)(6). Similarly, if a couple occupies a property near their place of employment on weekdays, but the couple returns to their principal residence on weekends, the property near the couple's place of employment is a second residence for purposes of §1003.4(a)(6).

4. Investment properties. Section 1003.4(a)(6) requires a financial institution to identify whether the property to which the covered loan or application relates is or will be used as an investment property. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(6), a property is an investment property if the borrower does not, or the applicant will not, occupy the property. For example, if a person purchases a property, does not occupy the property, and generates income by renting the property, the property is an investment property for purposes of §1003.4(a)(6). Similarly, if a person purchases a property, does not occupy the property, and does not generate income by renting the property, but intends to generate income by selling the property, the property is an investment property for purposes of §1003.4(a)(6). Section 1003.4(a)(6) requires a financial institution to identify a property as an investment property if the borrower or applicant does not or will not occupy the property, even if the borrower or applicant does not consider the property as owned for investment purposes. For example, if a corporation purchases a property that is a dwelling under §1003.2(f), that it does not occupy, but that is for the long-term residential use of its employees, the property is an investment property for purposes of §1003.4(a)(6), even if the corporation considers the property as owned for business purposes rather than investment purposes, does not generate income by renting the property, and does not intend to generate income by selling the property at some point in time. If the property is for transitory use by employees, the property would not be considered a dwelling under §1003.2(f). See comment 2(f)-3.

5. Purchased covered loans. For purchased covered loans, a financial institution may report principal residence unless the loan documents or application indicate that the property will not be occupied as a principal residence.

Paragraph 4(a)(7)

1. Covered loan amount—counteroffer. If an applicant accepts a counteroffer for an amount different from the amount for which the applicant applied, the financial institution reports the covered loan amount granted. If an applicant does not accept a counteroffer or fails to respond, the institution reports the amount initially requested.

2. Covered loan amount—application approved but not accepted or preapproval request approved but not accepted. A financial institution reports the covered loan amount that was approved.

3. Covered loan amount—preapproval request denied, application denied, closed for incompleteness or withdrawn. For a preapproval request that was denied, and for an application that was denied, closed for incompleteness, or withdrawn, a financial institution reports the amount for which the applicant applied.

4. Covered loan amount—multiple-purpose loan. A financial institution reports the entire amount of the covered loan, even if only a part of the proceeds is intended for home purchase, home improvement, or refinancing.

5. Covered loan amount—closed-end mortgage loan. For a closed-end mortgage loan, other than a purchased loan, an assumption, or a reverse mortgage, a financial institution reports the amount to be repaid as disclosed on the legal obligation. For a purchased closed-end mortgage loan or an assumption of a closed-end mortgage loan, a financial institution reports the unpaid principal balance at the time of purchase or assumption.

6. Covered loan amount—open-end line of credit. For an open-end line of credit, a financial institution reports the entire amount of credit available to the borrower under the terms of the open-end plan, including a purchased open-end line of credit and an assumption of an open-end line of credit, but not for a reverse mortgage open-end line of credit.

7. Covered loan amount—refinancing. For a refinancing, a financial institution reports the amount of credit extended under the terms of the new debt obligation.

8. Covered loan amount—home improvement loan. A financial institution reports the entire amount of a home improvement loan, even if only a part of the proceeds is intended for home improvement.

9. Covered loan amount—non-federally insured reverse mortgage. A financial institution reports the initial principal limit of a non-federally insured reverse mortgage as set forth in §1003.4(a)(7)(iii).

Paragraph 4(a)(8)(i)

1. Action taken—covered loan originated. A financial institution reports that the covered loan was originated if the financial institution made a credit decision approving the application before closing or account opening and that credit decision results in an extension of credit. The same is true for an application that began as a request for a preapproval that subsequently results in a covered loan being originated. See comments 4(a)-2 through -4 for guidance on transactions in which more than one institution is involved.

2. Action taken—covered loan purchased. A financial institution reports that the covered loan was purchased if the covered loan was purchased by the financial institution after closing or account opening and the financial institution did not make a credit decision on the application prior to closing or account opening, or if the financial institution did make a credit decision on the application prior to closing or account opening, but is repurchasing the loan from another entity that the loan was sold to. See comment 4(a)-5. See comments 4(a)-2 through -4 for guidance on transactions in which more than one financial institution is involved.

3. Action taken—application approved but not accepted. A financial institution reports application approved but not accepted if the financial institution made a credit decision approving the application before closing or account opening, subject solely to outstanding conditions that are customary commitment or closing conditions, but the applicant or the party that initially received the application fails to respond to the financial institution's approval within the specified time, or the closed-end mortgage loan was not otherwise consummated or the account was not otherwise opened. See comment 4(a)(8)(i)-13.

4. Action taken—application denied. A financial institution reports that the application was denied if it made a credit decision denying the application before an applicant withdraws the application or the file is closed for incompleteness. See comments 4(a)-2 through -4 for guidance on transactions in which more than one institution is involved.

5. Action taken—application withdrawn. A financial institution reports that the application was withdrawn when the application is expressly withdrawn by the applicant before the financial institution makes a credit decision denying the application, before the financial institution makes a credit decision approving the application, or before the file is closed for incompleteness. A financial institution also reports application withdrawn if the financial institution provides a conditional approval specifying underwriting or creditworthiness conditions, pursuant to comment 4(a)(8)(i)-13, and the application is expressly withdrawn by the applicant before the applicant satisfies all specified underwriting or creditworthiness conditions. A preapproval request that is withdrawn is not reportable under HMDA. See §1003.4(a).

6. Action taken—file closed for incompleteness. A financial institution reports that the file was closed for incompleteness if the financial institution sent a written notice of incompleteness under Regulation B, 12 CFR 1002.9(c)(2), and the applicant did not respond to the request for additional information within the period of time specified in the notice before the applicant satisfies all underwriting or creditworthiness conditions. See comment 4(a)(8)(i)-13. If a financial institution then provides a notification of adverse action on the basis of incompleteness under Regulation B, 12 CFR 1002.9(c)(1)(i), the financial institution may report the action taken as either file closed for incompleteness or application denied. A preapproval request that is closed for incompleteness is not reportable under HMDA. See §1003.4(a) and comment 4(a)-1.ii.

7. Action taken—preapproval request denied. A financial institution reports that the preapproval request was denied if the application was a request for a preapproval under a preapproval program as defined in §1003.2(b)(2) and the institution made a credit decision denying the preapproval request.

8. Action taken—preapproval request approved but not accepted. A financial institution reports that the preapproval request was approved but not accepted if the application was a request for a preapproval under a preapproval program as defined in §1003.2(b)(2) and the institution made a credit decision approving the preapproval request but the application did not result in a covered loan originated by the financial institution.

9. Action taken—counteroffers. If a financial institution makes a counteroffer to lend on terms different from the applicant's initial request (for example, for a shorter loan maturity, with a different interest rate, or in a different amount) and the applicant declines to proceed with the counteroffer or fails to respond, the institution reports the action taken as a denial on the original terms requested by the applicant. If the applicant agrees to proceed with consideration of the financial institution's counteroffer, the financial institution reports the action taken as the disposition of the application based on the terms of the counteroffer. For example, assume a financial institution makes a counteroffer, the applicant agrees to proceed with the terms of the counteroffer, and the financial institution then makes a credit decision approving the application conditional on satisfying underwriting or creditworthiness conditions, and the applicant expressly withdraws before satisfying all underwriting or creditworthiness conditions and before the institution denies the application or closes the file for incompleteness. The financial institution reports that the action taken as application withdrawn in accordance with comment 4(a)(8)(i)-13.i. Similarly, assume a financial institution makes a counteroffer, the applicant agrees to proceed with consideration of the counteroffer, and the financial institution provides a conditional approval stating the conditions to be met to originate the counteroffer. The financial institution reports the action taken on the application in accordance with comment 4(a)(8)(i)-13 regarding conditional approvals.

10. Action taken—rescinded transactions. If a borrower rescinds a transaction after closing and before a financial institution is required to submit its loan/application register containing the information for the transaction under §1003.5(a), the institution reports the transaction as an application that was approved but not accepted.

11. Action taken—purchased covered loans. An institution reports the covered loans that it purchased during the calendar year. An institution does not report the covered loans that it declined to purchase, unless, as discussed in comments 4(a)-2 through -4, the institution reviewed the application prior to closing, in which case it reports the application or covered loan according to comments 4(a)-2 through -4.

12. Action taken—repurchased covered loans. See comment 4(a)-5 regarding reporting requirements when a covered loan is repurchased by the originating financial institution.

13. Action taken—conditional approvals. If an institution issues an approval other than a commitment pursuant to a preapproval program as defined under §1003.2(b)(2), and that approval is subject to the applicant meeting certain conditions, the institution reports the action taken as provided below dependent on whether the conditions are solely customary commitment or closing conditions or if the conditions include any underwriting or creditworthiness conditions.

i. Action taken examples. If the approval is conditioned on satisfying underwriting or creditworthiness conditions and they are not met, the institution reports the action taken as a denial. If, however, the conditions involve submitting additional information about underwriting or creditworthiness that the institution needs to make the credit decision, and the institution has sent a written notice of incompleteness under Regulation B, 12 CFR 1002.9(c)(2), and the applicant did not respond within the period of time specified in the notice, the institution reports the action taken as file closed for incompleteness. See comment 4(a)(8)(i)-6. If the conditions are solely customary commitment or closing conditions and the conditions are not met, the institution reports the action taken as approved but not accepted. If all the conditions (underwriting, creditworthiness, or customary commitment or closing conditions) are satisfied and the institution agrees to extend credit but the covered loan is not originated, the institution reports the action taken as application approved but not accepted. If the applicant expressly withdraws before satisfying all underwriting or creditworthiness conditions and before the institution denies the application or closes the file for incompleteness, the institution reports the action taken as application withdrawn. If all underwriting and creditworthiness conditions have been met, and the outstanding conditions are solely customary commitment or closing conditions and the applicant expressly withdraws before the covered loan is originated, the institution reports the action taken as application approved but not accepted.

ii. Customary commitment or closing conditions. Customary commitment or closing conditions include, for example: a clear-title requirement, an acceptable property survey, acceptable title insurance binder, clear termite inspection, a subordination agreement from another lienholder, and, where the applicant plans to use the proceeds from the sale of one home to purchase another, a settlement statement showing adequate proceeds from the sale.

iii. Underwriting or creditworthiness conditions. Underwriting or creditworthiness conditions include, for example: conditions that constitute a counter-offer, such as a demand for a higher down-payment; satisfactory debt-to-income or loan-to-value ratios, a determination of need for private mortgage insurance, or a satisfactory appraisal requirement; or verification or confirmation, in whatever form the institution requires, that the applicant meets underwriting conditions concerning applicant creditworthiness, including documentation or verification of income or assets.

14. Action taken—pending applications. An institution does not report any covered loan application still pending at the end of the calendar year; it reports that application on its loan/application register for the year in which final action is taken.

Paragraph 4(a)(8)(ii)

1. Action taken date—general. A financial institution reports the date of the action taken.

2. Action taken date—applications denied and files closed for incompleteness. For applications, including requests for a preapproval, that are denied or for files closed for incompleteness, the financial institution reports either the date the action was taken or the date the notice was sent to the applicant.

3. Action taken date—application withdrawn. For applications withdrawn, the financial institution may report the date the express withdrawal was received or the date shown on the notification form in the case of a written withdrawal.

4. Action taken date—approved but not accepted. For a covered loan approved by an institution but not accepted by the applicant, the institution reports any reasonable date, such as the approval date, the deadline for accepting the offer, or the date the file was closed. Although an institution need not choose the same approach for its entire HMDA submission, it should be generally consistent (such as by routinely using one approach within a particular division of the institution or for a category of covered loans).

5. Action taken date—originations. For covered loan originations, including a preapproval request that leads to an origination by the financial institution, an institution generally reports the closing or account opening date. For covered loan originations that an institution acquires from a party that initially received the application, the institution reports either the closing or account opening date, or the date the institution acquired the covered loan from the party that initially received the application. If the disbursement of funds takes place on a date later than the closing or account opening date, the institution may use the date of initial disbursement. For a construction/permanent covered loan, the institution reports either the closing or account opening date, or the date the covered loan converts to the permanent financing. Although an institution need not choose the same approach for its entire HMDA submission, it should be generally consistent (such as by routinely using one approach within a particular division of the institution or for a category of covered loans). Notwithstanding this flexibility regarding the use of the closing or account opening date in connection with reporting the date action was taken, the institution must report the origination as occurring in the year in which the origination goes to closing or the account is opened.

6. Action taken date—loan purchased. For covered loans purchased, a financial institution reports the date of purchase.

Paragraph 4(a)(9)

1. Multiple properties with one property taken as security. If a covered loan is related to more than one property, but only one property is taken as security (or, in the case of an application, proposed to be taken as security), a financial institution reports the information required by §1003.4(a)(9) for the property taken as or proposed to be taken as security. A financial institution does not report the information required by §1003.4(a)(9) for the property or properties related to the loan that are not taken as or proposed to be taken as security. For example, if a covered loan is secured by property A, and the proceeds are used to purchase or rehabilitate (or to refinance home purchase or home improvement loans related to) property B, the institution reports the information required by §1003.4(a)(9) for property A and does not report the information required by §1003.4(a)(9) for property B.

2. Multiple properties with more than one property taken as security. If more than one property is taken or, in the case of an application, proposed to be taken as security for a single covered loan, a financial institution reports the covered loan or application in a single entry on its loan/application register and provides the information required by §1003.4(a)(9) for one of the properties taken as security that contains a dwelling. A financial institution does not report information about the other properties taken as security. If an institution is required to report specific information about the property identified in §1003.4(a)(9), the institution reports the information that relates to the property identified in §1003.4(a)(9). For example, Financial Institution A originated a covered loan that is secured by both property A and property B, each of which contains a dwelling. Financial Institution A reports the loan as one entry on its loan/application register, reporting the information required by §1003.4(a)(9) for either property A or property B. If Financial Institution A elects to report the information required by §1003.4(a)(9) about property A, Financial Institution A also reports the information required by §1003.4(a)(5), (6), (14), (29), and (30) related to property A. For aspects of the entries that do not refer to the property identified in §1003.4(a)(9) (i.e., §1003.4(a)(1) through (4), (7), (8), (10) through (13), (15) through (28), (31) through (38)), Financial Institution A reports the information applicable to the covered loan or application and not information that relates only to the property identified in §1003.4(a)(9).

3. Multifamily dwellings. A single multifamily dwelling may have more than one postal address. For example, three apartment buildings, each with a different street address, comprise a single multifamily dwelling that secures a covered loan. For the purposes of §1003.4(a)(9), a financial institution reports the information required by §1003.4(a)(9) in the same manner described in comment 4(a)(9)-2.

4. Loans purchased from another institution. The requirement to report the property location information required by §1003.4(a)(9) applies not only to applications and originations but also to purchased covered loans.

5. Manufactured home. If the site of a manufactured home has not been identified, a financial institution complies by reporting that the information required by §1003.4(a)(9) is not applicable.

Paragraph 4(a)(9)(i)

1. General. Section 1003.4(a)(9)(i) requires a financial institution to report the property address of the location of the property securing a covered loan or, in the case of an application, proposed to secure a covered loan. The address should correspond to the property identified on the legal obligation related to the covered loan. For applications that did not result in an origination, the address should correspond to the location of the property proposed to secure the loan as identified by the applicant. For example, assume a loan is secured by a property located at 123 Main Street, and the applicant's or borrower's mailing address is a post office box. The financial institution should not report the post office box, and should report 123 Main Street.

2. Property address—format. A financial institution complies with the requirements in §1003.4(a)(9)(i) by reporting the following information about the physical location of the property securing the loan.

i. Street address. When reporting the street address of the property, a financial institution complies by including, as applicable, the primary address number, the predirectional, the street name, street prefixes and/or suffixes, the postdirectional, the secondary address identifier, and the secondary address, as applicable. For example, 100 N Main ST Apt 1.

ii. City name. A financial institution complies by reporting the name of the city in which the property is located.

iii. State name. A financial institution complies by reporting the two letter State code for the State in which the property is located, using the U.S. Postal Service official State abbreviations.

iv. Zip Code. A financial institution complies by reporting the five or nine digit Zip Code in which the property is located.

3. Property address—not applicable. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(9)(i) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable if the property address of the property securing the covered loan is not known. For example, if the property did not have a property address at closing or if the applicant did not provide the property address of the property to the financial institution before the application was denied, withdrawn, or closed for incompleteness, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(9)(i) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable.

Paragraph 4(a)(9)(ii)

1. Optional reporting. Section 1003.4(a)(9)(ii) requires a financial institution to report the State, county, and census tract of the property securing the covered loan or, in the case of an application, proposed to secure the covered loan if the property is located in an MSA or MD in which the financial institution has a home or branch office or if the institution is subject to §1003.4(e). Section 1003.4(a)(9)(ii)(C) further limits the requirement to report census tract to covered loans secured by or applications proposed to be secured by properties located in counties with a population of more than 30,000 according to the most recent decennial census conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. For transactions for which State, county, or census tract reporting is not required under §1003.4(a)(9)(ii) or (e), financial institutions may report that the requirement is not applicable, or they may voluntarily report the State, county, or census tract information.

Paragraph 4(a)(9)(ii)(A)

1. Applications—State not provided. When reporting an application, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(9)(ii)(A) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable if the State in which the property is located was not known before the application was denied, withdrawn, or closed for incompleteness.

Paragraph 4(a)(9)(ii)(B)

1. General. A financial institution complies by reporting the five-digit Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) numerical county code.

2. Applications—county not provided. When reporting an application, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(9)(ii)(B) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable if the county in which the property is located was not known before the application was denied, withdrawn, or closed for incompleteness.

Paragraph 4(a)(9)(ii)(C)

1. General. Census tract numbers are defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(9)(ii)(C) if it uses the boundaries and codes in effect on January 1 of the calendar year covered by the loan/application register that it is reporting.

2. Applications—census tract not provided. When reporting an application, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(9)(ii)(C) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable if the census tract in which the property is located was not known before the application was denied, withdrawn, or closed for incompleteness.

Paragraph 4(a)(10)(i)

1. Applicant data—general. Refer to appendix B to this part for instructions on collection of an applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex.

2. Transition rule for applicant data collected prior to January 1, 2018. If a financial institution receives an application prior to January 1, 2018, but final action is taken on or after January 1, 2018, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(10)(i) and (b) if it collects the information in accordance with the requirements in effect at the time the information was collected. For example, if a financial institution receives an application on November 15, 2017, collects the applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex in accordance with the instructions in effect on that date, and takes final action on the application on January 5, 2018, the financial institution has complied with the requirements of §1003.4(a)(10)(i) and (b), even though those instructions changed after the information was collected but before the date of final action. However, if, in this example, the financial institution collected the applicant's ethnicity, race, and sex on or after January 1, 2018, §1003.4(a)(10)(i) and (b) requires the financial institution to collect the information in accordance with the amended instructions.

Paragraph 4(a)(10)(ii)

1. Applicant data—completion by financial institution. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(10)(ii) by reporting the applicant's age, as of the application date under §1003.4(a)(1)(ii), as the number of whole years derived from the date of birth as shown on the application form. For example, if an applicant provides a date of birth of 01/15/1970 on the application form that the financial institution receives on 01/14/2015, the institution reports 44 as the applicant's age.

2. Applicant data—co-applicant. If there are no co-applicants, the financial institution reports that there is no co-applicant. If there is more than one co-applicant, the financial institution reports the age only for the first co-applicant listed on the application form. A co-applicant may provide an absent co-applicant's age on behalf of the absent co-applicant.

3. Applicant data—purchased loan. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(10)(ii) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable when reporting a purchased loan for which the institution chooses not to report the age.

4. Applicant data—non-natural person. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(10)(ii) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable if the applicant or co-applicant is not a natural person (for example, a corporation, partnership, or trust). For example, for a transaction involving a trust, a financial institution reports that the requirement to report the applicant's age is not applicable if the trust is the applicant. On the other hand, if the applicant is a natural person, and is the beneficiary of a trust, a financial institution reports the applicant's age.

5. Applicant data—guarantor. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(10)(ii), if a covered loan or application includes a guarantor, a financial institution does not report the guarantor's age.

Paragraph 4(a)(10)(iii)

1. Income data—income relied on. When a financial institution evaluates income as part of a credit decision, it reports the gross annual income relied on in making the credit decision. For example, if an institution relies on an applicant's salary to compute a debt-to-income ratio but also relies on the applicant's annual bonus to evaluate creditworthiness, the institution reports the salary and the bonus to the extent relied upon. If an institution relies on only a portion of an applicant's income in its determination, it does not report that portion of income not relied on. For example, if an institution, pursuant to lender and investor guidelines, does not rely on an applicant's commission income because it has been earned for less than 12 months, the institution does not include the applicant's commission income in the income reported. Likewise, if an institution relies on the verified gross income of the applicant in making the credit decision, then the institution reports the verified gross income. Similarly, if an institution relies on the income of a cosigner to evaluate creditworthiness, the institution includes the cosigner's income to the extent relied upon. An institution, however, does not include the income of a guarantor who is only secondarily liable.

2. Income data—co-applicant. If two persons jointly apply for a covered loan and both list income on the application, but the financial institution relies on the income of only one applicant in evaluating creditworthiness, the institution reports only the income relied on.

3. Income data—loan to employee. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(10)(iii) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable for a covered loan to, or an application from, its employee to protect the employee's privacy, even though the institution relied on the employee's income in making the credit decision.

4. Income data—assets. A financial institution does not include as income amounts considered in making a credit decision based on factors that an institution relies on in addition to income, such as amounts derived from underwriting calculations of the potential annuitization or depletion of an applicant's remaining assets. Actual distributions from retirement accounts or other assets that are relied on by the financial institution as income should be reported as income. The interpretation of income in this paragraph does not affect §1003.4(a)(23), which requires, except for purchased covered loans, the collection of the ratio of the applicant's or borrower's total monthly debt to the total monthly income relied on in making the credit decision.

5. Income data—credit decision not made. Section 1003.4(a)(10)(iii) requires a financial institution to report the gross annual income relied on in processing the application if a credit decision was not made. For example, assume an institution received an application that included an applicant's self-reported income, but the application was withdrawn before a credit decision that would have considered income was made. The financial institution reports the income information relied on in processing the application at the time that the application was withdrawn or the file was closed for incompleteness.

6. Income data—credit decision not requiring consideration of income. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(10)(iii) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable if the application did not or would not have required a credit decision that considered income under the financial institution's policies and procedures. For example, if the financial institution's policies and procedures do not consider income for a streamlined refinance program, the institution reports that the requirement is not applicable, even if the institution received income information from the applicant.

7. Income data—non-natural person. A financial institution reports that the requirement is not applicable when the applicant or co-applicant is not a natural person (e.g., a corporation, partnership, or trust). For example, for a transaction involving a trust, a financial institution reports that the requirement to report income data is not applicable if the trust is the applicant. On the other hand, if the applicant is a natural person, and is the beneficiary of a trust, a financial institution is required to report the information described in §1003.4(a)(10)(iii).

8. Income data—multifamily properties. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(10)(iii) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable when the covered loan is secured by, or application is proposed to be secured by, a multifamily dwelling.

9. Income data—purchased loans. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(10)(iii) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable when reporting a purchased covered loan for which the institution chooses not to report the income.

10. Income data—rounding. A financial institution complies by reporting the dollar amount of the income in thousands, rounded to the nearest thousand ($500 rounds up to the next $1,000). For example, $35,500 is reported as 36.

Paragraph 4(a)(11)

1. Type of purchaser—loan-participation interests sold to more than one entity. A financial institution that originates a covered loan, and then sells it to more than one entity, reports the “type of purchaser” based on the entity purchasing the greatest interest, if any. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(11), if a financial institution sells some interest or interests in a covered loan but retains a majority interest in that loan, it does not report the sale.

2. Type of purchaser—swapped covered loans. Covered loans “swapped” for mortgage-backed securities are to be treated as sales; the purchaser is the entity receiving the covered loans that are swapped.

3. Type of purchaser—affiliate institution. For purposes of complying with §1003.4(a)(11), the term “affiliate” means any company that controls, is controlled by, or is under common control with, another company, as set forth in the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (12 U.S.C. 1841 et seq.).

4. Type of purchaser—private securitizations. A financial institution that knows or reasonably believes that the covered loan it is selling will be securitized by the entity purchasing the covered loan, other than by one of the government-sponsored enterprises, reports the purchasing entity type as a private securitizer regardless of the type or affiliation of the purchasing entity. Knowledge or reasonable belief could, for example, be based on the purchase agreement or other related documents, the financial institution's previous transactions with the purchaser, or the purchaser's role as a securitizer (such as an investment bank). If a financial institution selling a covered loan does not know or reasonably believe that the purchaser will securitize the loan, and the seller knows that the purchaser frequently holds or disposes of loans by means other than securitization, then the financial institution should report the covered loan as purchased by, as appropriate, a commercial bank, savings bank, savings association, life insurance company, credit union, mortgage company, finance company, affiliate institution, or other type of purchaser.

5. Type of purchaser—mortgage company. For purposes of complying with §1003.4(a)(11), a mortgage company means a nondepository institution that purchases covered loans and typically originates such loans. A mortgage company might be an affiliate or a subsidiary of a bank holding company or thrift holding company, or it might be an independent mortgage company. Regardless, a financial institution reports the purchasing entity type as a mortgage company, unless the mortgage company is an affiliate of the seller institution, in which case the seller institution should report the loan as purchased by an affiliate institution.

6. Purchases by subsidiaries. A financial institution that sells a covered loan to its subsidiary that is a commercial bank, savings bank, or savings association, should report the covered loan as purchased by a commercial bank, savings bank, or savings association. A financial institution that sells a covered loan to its subsidiary that is a life insurance company, should report the covered loan as purchased by a life insurance company. A financial institution that sells a covered loan to its subsidiary that is a credit union, mortgage company, or finance company, should report the covered loan as purchased by a credit union, mortgage company, or finance company. If the subsidiary that purchases the covered loan is not a commercial bank, savings bank, savings association, life insurance company, credit union, mortgage company, or finance company, the seller institution should report the loan as purchased by other type of purchaser. The financial institution should report the covered loan as purchased by an affiliate institution when the subsidiary is an affiliate of the seller institution.

7. Type of purchaser—bank holding company or thrift holding company. When a financial institution sells a covered loan to a bank holding company or thrift holding company (rather than to one of its subsidiaries), it should report the loan as purchased by other type of purchaser, unless the bank holding company or thrift holding company is an affiliate of the seller institution, in which case the seller institution should report the loan as purchased by an affiliate institution.

8. Repurchased covered loans. See comment 4(a)-5 regarding reporting requirements when a covered loan is repurchased by the originating financial institution.

9. Type of purchaser—quarterly recording. For purposes of recording the type of purchaser within 30 calendar days after the end of the calendar quarter pursuant to §1003.4(f), a financial institution records that the requirement is not applicable if the institution originated or purchased a covered loan and did not sell it during the calendar quarter for which the institution is recording the data. If the financial institution sells the covered loan in a subsequent quarter of the same calendar year, the financial institution records the type of purchaser on its loan/application register for the quarter in which the covered loan was sold. If a financial institution sells the covered loan in a succeeding year, the financial institution should not record the sale.

10. Type of purchaser—not applicable. A financial institution reports that the requirement is not applicable for applications that were denied, withdrawn, closed for incompleteness or approved but not accepted by the applicant; and for preapproval requests that were denied or approved but not accepted by the applicant. A financial institution also reports that the requirement is not applicable if the institution originated or purchased a covered loan and did not sell it during that same calendar year.

Paragraph 4(a)(12)

1. Average prime offer rate. Average prime offer rates are annual percentage rates derived from average interest rates and other loan pricing terms offered to borrowers by a set of creditors for mortgage loans that have low-risk pricing characteristics. Other loan pricing terms may include commonly used indices, margins, and initial fixed-rate periods for variable-rate transactions. Relevant pricing characteristics may include a consumer's credit history and transaction characteristics such as the loan-to-value ratio, owner-occupant status, and purpose of the transaction. To obtain average prime offer rates, the Bureau uses creditor data by transaction type.

2. Bureau tables. The Bureau publishes tables of current and historic average prime offer rates by transaction type on the FFIEC's Web site (http://www.ffiec.gov/hmda) and the Bureau's Web site (https://www.consumerfinance.gov). The Bureau calculates an annual percentage rate, consistent with Regulation Z (see 12 CFR 1026.22 and 12 CFR part 1026, appendix J), for each transaction type for which pricing terms are available from the creditor data described in comment 4(a)(12)-1. The Bureau uses loan pricing terms available in the creditor data and other information to estimate annual percentage rates for other types of transactions for which the creditor data are limited or not available. The Bureau publishes on the FFIEC's Web site and the Bureau's Web site the methodology it uses to arrive at these estimates. A financial institution may either use the average prime offer rates published by the Bureau or determine average prime offer rates itself by employing the methodology published on the FFIEC's Web site and the Bureau's Web site. A financial institution that determines average prime offer rates itself, however, is responsible for correctly determining the rates in accordance with the published methodology.

3. Rate spread calculation—annual percentage rate. The requirements of §1003.4(a)(12)(i) refer to the covered loan's annual percentage rate. For closed-end mortgage loans, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(12)(i) by relying on the annual percentage rate for the covered loan, as calculated and disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.18 or 1026.38. For open-end lines of credit, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(12)(i) by relying on the annual percentage rate for the covered loan, as calculated and disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.6. If multiple annual percentage rates are calculated and disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.6, a financial institution relies on the annual percentage rate in effect at the time of account opening. If an open-end line of credit has a variable-rate feature and a fixed-rate and -term payment option during the draw period, a financial institution relies on the annual percentage rate in effect at the time of account opening under the variable-rate feature, which would be a discounted initial rate if one is offered under the variable-rate feature. See comment 4(a)(12)-8 for guidance regarding the annual percentage rate a financial institution relies on in the case of an application or preapproval request that was approved but not accepted.

4. Rate spread calculation—comparable transaction. The rate spread calculation in §1003.4(a)(12)(i) is defined by reference to a comparable transaction, which is determined according to the covered loan's amortization type (i.e., fixed- or variable-rate) and loan term. For covered loans that are open-end lines of credit, §1003.4(a)(12)(i) requires a financial institution to identify the most closely comparable closed-end transaction. The tables of average prime offer rates published by the Bureau (see comment 4(a)(12)-2) provide additional detail about how to identify the comparable transaction.

i. Fixed-rate transactions. For fixed-rate covered loans, the term for identifying the comparable transaction is the transaction's maturity (i.e., the period until the last payment will be due under the closed-end mortgage loan contract or open-end line of credit agreement). If an open-end credit plan has a fixed rate but no definite plan length, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(12)(i) by using a 30-year fixed-rate loan as the most closely comparable closed-end transaction. Financial institutions may refer to the table on the FFIEC Web site entitled “Average Prime Offer Rates-Fixed” when identifying a comparable fixed-rate transaction.

ii. Variable-rate transactions. For variable-rate covered loans, the term for identifying the comparable transaction is the initial, fixed-rate period (i.e., the period until the first scheduled rate adjustment). For example, five years is the relevant term for a variable-rate transaction with a five-year, fixed-rate introductory period that is amortized over thirty years. Financial institutions may refer to the table on the FFIEC Web site entitled “Average Prime Offer Rates-Variable” when identifying a comparable variable-rate transaction. If an open-end line of credit has a variable rate and an optional, fixed-rate feature, a financial institution uses the rate table for variable-rate transactions.

iii. Term not in whole years. When a covered loan's term to maturity (or, for a variable-rate transaction, the initial fixed-rate period) is not in whole years, the financial institution uses the number of whole years closest to the actual loan term or, if the actual loan term is exactly halfway between two whole years, by using the shorter loan term. For example, for a loan term of ten years and three months, the relevant term is ten years; for a loan term of ten years and nine months, the relevant term is 11 years; for a loan term of ten years and six months, the relevant term is ten years. If a loan term includes an odd number of days, in addition to an odd number of months, the financial institution rounds to the nearest whole month, or rounds down if the number of odd days is exactly halfway between two months. The financial institution rounds to one year any covered loan with a term shorter than six months, including variable-rate covered loans with no initial, fixed-rate periods. For example, if an open-end covered loan has a rate that varies according to an index plus a margin, with no introductory, fixed-rate period, the transaction term is one year.

iv. Amortization period longer than loan term. If the amortization period of a covered loan is longer than the term of the transaction to maturity, §1003.4(a)(12)(i) requires a financial institution to use the loan term to determine the applicable average prime offer rate. For example, assume a financial institution originates a closed-end, fixed-rate loan that has a term to maturity of five years and a thirty-year amortization period that results in a balloon payment. The financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(12)(i) by using the five-year loan term.

5. Rate-set date. The relevant date to use to determine the average prime offer rate for a comparable transaction is the date on which the interest rate was set by the financial institution for the final time before final action is taken (i.e., the application was approved but not accepted or the covered loan was originated).

i. Rate-lock agreement. If an interest rate is set pursuant to a “lock-in” agreement between the financial institution and the borrower, then the date on which the agreement fixes the interest rate is the date the rate was set. Except as provided in comment 4(a)(12)-5.ii, if a rate is reset after a lock-in agreement is executed (for example, because the borrower exercises a float-down option or the agreement expires), then the relevant date is the date the financial institution exercises discretion in setting the rate for the final time before final action is taken. The same rule applies when a rate-lock agreement is extended and the rate is reset at the same rate, regardless of whether market rates have increased, decreased, or remained the same since the initial rate was set. If no lock-in agreement is executed, then the relevant date is the date on which the institution sets the rate for the final time before final action is taken.

ii. Change in loan program. If a financial institution issues a rate-lock commitment under one loan program, the borrower subsequently changes to another program that is subject to different pricing terms, and the financial institution changes the rate promised to the borrower under the rate-lock commitment accordingly, the rate-set date is the date of the program change. However, if the financial institution changes the promised rate to the rate that would have been available to the borrower under the new program on the date of the original rate-lock commitment, then that is the date the rate is set, provided the financial institution consistently follows that practice in all such cases or the original rate-lock agreement so provided. For example, assume that a borrower locks a rate of 2.5 percent on June 1 for a 30-year, variable-rate loan with a five-year, fixed-rate introductory period. On June 15, the borrower decides to switch to a 30-year, fixed-rate loan, and the rate available to the borrower for that product on June 15 is 4.0 percent. On June 1, the 30-year, fixed-rate loan would have been available to the borrower at a rate of 3.5 percent. If the financial institution offers the borrower the 3.5 percent rate (i.e., the rate that would have been available to the borrower for the fixed-rate product on June 1, the date of the original rate-lock) because the original agreement so provided or because the financial institution consistently follows that practice for borrowers who change loan programs, then the financial institution should use June 1 as the rate-set date. In all other cases, the financial institution should use June 15 as the rate-set date.

iii. Brokered loans. When a financial institution has reporting responsibility for an application for a covered loan that it received from a broker, as discussed in comment 4(a)-2 (e.g., because the financial institution makes a credit decision prior to closing or account opening), the rate-set date is the last date the financial institution set the rate with the broker, not the date the broker set the borrower's rate.

6. Compare the annual percentage rate to the average prime offer rate. Section 1003.4(a)(12)(i) requires a financial institution to compare the covered loan's annual percentage rate to the most recently available average prime offer rate that was in effect for the comparable transaction as of the rate-set date. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(12)(i), the most recently available rate means the average prime offer rate set forth in the applicable table with the most recent effective date as of the date the interest rate was set. However, §1003.4(a)(12)(i) does not permit a financial institution to use an average prime offer rate before its effective date.

7. Rate spread—not applicable. If the covered loan is an assumption, reverse mortgage, a purchased loan, or is not subject to Regulation Z, 12 CFR part 1026, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(12) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable. If the application did not result in an origination for a reason other than the application was approved but not accepted by the applicant, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(12) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable.

8. Application or preapproval request approved but not accepted. In the case of an application or preapproval request that was approved but not accepted, §1003.4(a)(12) requires a financial institution to report the applicable rate spread. In such cases, the financial institution would provide early disclosures under Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.18 or 1026.37 (for closed-end mortgage loans), or 1026.40 (for open-end lines of credit), but might never provide any subsequent disclosures. In such cases where no subsequent disclosures are provided, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(12)(i) by relying on the annual percentage rate for the application or preapproval request, as calculated and disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.18 or 1026.37 (for closed-end mortgage loans), or 1026.40 (for open-end lines of credit), as applicable. For transactions subject to Regulation C for which no disclosures under Regulation Z are required, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(12)(i) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable.

9. Corrected disclosures. In the case of a covered loan or an application that was approved but not accepted, if the annual percentage rate changes because a financial institution provides a corrected version of the disclosures required under Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(a), pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.19(a)(2), under 12 CFR 1026.19(f), pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2), or under 12 CFR 1026.6(a), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(12)(i) by comparing the corrected and disclosed annual percentage rate to the most recently available average prime offer rate that was in effect for a comparable transaction as of the rate-set date, provided that the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower prior to the end of the reporting period in which final action is taken. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(12), the date the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower is the date the disclosure was mailed or delivered to the borrower in person; the financial institution's method of delivery does not affect the date provided. For example, where a financial institution provides a corrected version of the disclosures required under 12 CFR 1026.19(f), pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2), the date provided is the date disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.38(a)(3)(i). The provision of a corrected disclosure does not affect how a financial institution determines the rate-set date. See comment 4(a)(12)-5. For example, in the case of a financial institution's annual loan/application register submission made pursuant to §1003.5(a)(1), if the financial institution provides a corrected disclosure to the borrower pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2)(v), that reflects a corrected annual percentage rate, the financial institution reports the difference between the corrected annual percentage rate and the most recently available average prime offer rate that was in effect for a comparable transaction as of the rate-set date if the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower prior to the end of the calendar year in which final action is taken.

Paragraph 4(a)(13)

1. HOEPA status—not applicable. If the covered loan is not subject to the Home Ownership and Equity Protection Act of 1994, as implemented in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.32, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(13) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable. If an application did not result in an origination, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(13) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable.

Paragraph 4(a)(14)

1. Determining lien status for applications and covered loans originated and purchased. i. Financial institutions are required to report lien status for covered loans they originate and purchase and applications that do not result in originations (preapproval requests that are approved but not accepted, preapproval requests that are denied, applications that are approved but not accepted, denied, withdrawn, or closed for incompleteness). For covered loans purchased by a financial institution, lien status is determined by reference to the best information readily available to the financial institution at the time of purchase. For covered loans that a financial institution originates and applications that do not result in originations, lien status is determined by reference to the best information readily available to the financial institution at the time final action is taken and to the financial institution's own procedures. Thus, financial institutions may rely on the title search they routinely perform as part of their underwriting procedures—for example, for home purchase loans. Regulation C does not require financial institutions to perform title searches solely to comply with HMDA reporting requirements. Financial institutions may rely on other information that is readily available to them at the time final action is taken and that they reasonably believe is accurate, such as the applicant's statement on the application or the applicant's credit report. For example, where the applicant indicates on the application that there is a mortgage on the property or where the applicant's credit report shows that the applicant has a mortgage—and that mortgage will not be paid off as part of the transaction—the financial institution may assume that the loan it originates is secured by a subordinate lien. If the same application did not result in an origination—for example, because the application was denied or withdrawn—the financial institution would report the application as an application for a subordinate-lien loan.

ii. Financial institutions may also consider their established procedures when determining lien status for applications that do not result in originations. For example, assume an applicant applies to a financial institution to refinance a $100,000 first mortgage; the applicant also has an open-end line of credit for $20,000. If the financial institution's practice in such a case is to ensure that it will have first-lien position—through a subordination agreement with the holder of the lien securing the open-end line of credit—then the financial institution should report the application as an application for a first-lien covered loan.

2. Multiple properties. See comment 4(a)(9)-2 regarding transactions involving multiple properties with more than one property taken as security.

Paragraph 4(a)(15)

1. Credit score—relied on. Except for purchased covered loans, §1003.4(a)(15) requires a financial institution to report the credit score or scores relied on in making the credit decision and information about the scoring model used to generate each score. A financial institution relies on a credit score in making the credit decision if the credit score was a factor in the credit decision even if it was not a dispositive factor. For example, if a credit score is one of multiple factors in a financial institution's credit decision, the financial institution has relied on the credit score even if the financial institution denies the application because one or more underwriting requirements other than the credit score are not satisfied.

2. Credit score—multiple credit scores. When a financial institution obtains or creates two or more credit scores for a single applicant or borrower but relies on only one score in making the credit decision (for example, by relying on the lowest, highest, most recent, or average of all of the scores), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(15) by reporting that credit score and information about the scoring model used. When a financial institution uses more than one credit scoring model and combines the scores into a composite credit score that it relies on, the financial institution reports that score and reports that more than one credit scoring model was used. When a financial institution obtains or creates two or more credit scores for an applicant or borrower and relies on multiple scores for the applicant or borrower in making the credit decision (for example, by relying on a scoring grid that considers each of the scores obtained or created for the applicant or borrower without combining the scores into a composite score), §1003.4(a)(15) requires the financial institution to report one of the credit scores for the applicant or borrower that was relied on in making the credit decision. In choosing which credit score to report in this circumstance, a financial institution need not use the same approach for its entire HMDA submission, but it should be generally consistent (such as by routinely using one approach within a particular division of the institution or for a category of covered loans). In instances such as these, the financial institution should report the name and version of the credit scoring model for the score reported.

3. Credit score—multiple applicants or borrowers. In a transaction involving two or more applicants or borrowers for whom the financial institution obtains or creates a single credit score and relies on that credit score in making the credit decision for the transaction, the institution complies with §1003.4(a)(15) by reporting that credit score for the applicant and reporting that the requirement is not applicable for the first co-applicant or, at the financial institution's discretion, by reporting that credit score for the first co-applicant and reporting that the requirement is not applicable for the applicant. Otherwise, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(15) by reporting a credit score for the applicant that it relied on in making the credit decision, if any, and a credit score for the first co-applicant that it relied on in making the credit decision, if any. To illustrate, assume a transaction involves one applicant and one co-applicant and that the financial institution obtains or creates two credit scores for the applicant and two credit scores for the co-applicant. Assume further that the financial institution relies on a single credit score that is the lowest, highest, most recent, or average of all of the credit scores obtained or created to make the credit decision for the transaction. The financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(15) by reporting that credit score and information about the scoring model used for the applicant and reporting that the requirement is not applicable for the first co-applicant or, at the financial institution's discretion, by reporting the data for the first co-applicant and reporting that the requirement is not applicable for the applicant. Alternatively, assume a transaction involves one applicant and one co-applicant and that the financial institution obtains or creates three credit scores for the applicant and three credit scores for the co-applicant. Assume further that the financial institution relies on the middle credit score for the applicant and the middle credit score for the co-applicant to make the credit decision for the transaction. The financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(15) by reporting both the middle score for the applicant and the middle score for the co-applicant.

4. Transactions for which no credit decision was made. If a file was closed for incompleteness or the application was withdrawn before a credit decision was made, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(15) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had obtained or created a credit score for the applicant or co-applicant. For example, if a file is closed for incompleteness and is so reported in accordance with §1003.4(a)(8), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(15) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had obtained or created a credit score for the applicant or co-applicant. Similarly, if an application was withdrawn by the applicant before a credit decision was made and is so reported in accordance with §1003.4(a)(8), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(15) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had obtained or created a credit score for the applicant or co-applicant.

5. Transactions for which no credit score was relied on. If a financial institution makes a credit decision without relying on a credit score for the applicant or borrower, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(15) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable.

6. Purchased covered loan. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(15) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable when the covered loan is a purchased covered loan.

7. Non-natural person. When the applicant and co-applicant, if applicable, are not natural persons, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(15) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable.

Paragraph 4(a)(16)

1. Reason for denial—general. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(16) by reporting the principal reason or reasons it denied the application, indicating up to four reasons. The financial institution should report only the principal reason or reasons it denied the application, even if there are fewer than four reasons. For example, if a financial institution denies the application because of the applicant's credit history and debt-to-income ratio, the financial institution need only report these two principal reasons. The reasons reported must be specific and accurately describe the principal reason or reasons the financial institution denied the application.

2. Reason for denial—preapproval request denied. Section 1003.4(a)(16) requires a financial institution to report the principal reason or reasons it denied the application. A request for a preapproval under a preapproval program as defined by §1003.2(b)(2) is an application. If a financial institution denies a preapproval request, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(16) by reporting the reason or reasons it denied the preapproval request.

3. Reason for denial—adverse action model form or similar form. If a financial institution chooses to provide the applicant the reason or reasons it denied the application using the model form contained in appendix C to Regulation B (Form C-1, Sample Notice of Action Taken and Statement of Reasons) or a similar form, §1003.4(a)(16) requires the financial institution to report the reason or reasons that were specified on the form by the financial institution, which includes reporting the “Other” reason or reasons that were specified on the form by the financial institution, if applicable. If a financial institution chooses to provide a disclosure of the applicant's right to a statement of specific reasons using the model form contained in appendix C to Regulation B (Form C-5, Sample Disclosure of Right to Request Specific Reasons for Credit Denial) or a similar form, or chooses to provide the denial reason or reasons orally under Regulation B, 12 CFR 1002.9(a)(2)(ii), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(16) by entering the principal reason or reasons it denied the application.

4. Reason for denial—not applicable. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(16) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable if the action taken on the application, pursuant to §1003.4(a)(8), is not a denial. For example, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(16) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable if the loan is originated or purchased by the financial institution, or the application or preapproval request was approved but not accepted, or the application was withdrawn before a credit decision was made, or the file was closed for incompleteness.

Paragraph 4(a)(17)(i)

1. Total loan costs—not applicable. Section 1003.4(a)(17)(i) does not require financial institutions to report the total loan costs for applications, or for transactions not subject to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.43(c), and 12 CFR 1026.19(f), such as open-end lines of credit, reverse mortgages, or loans or lines of credit made primarily for business or commercial purposes. In these cases, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(17)(i) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable to the transaction.

2. Purchased loans—applications received prior to the integrated disclosure effective date. For purchased covered loans subject to this reporting requirement for which applications were received by the selling entity prior to the effective date of Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(17)(i) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable to the transaction.

3. Corrected disclosures. If the amount of total loan costs changes because a financial institution provides a corrected version of the disclosures required under Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(17)(i) by reporting the corrected amount, provided that the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower prior to the end of the reporting period in which closing occurs. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(17)(i), the date the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower is the date disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.38(a)(3)(i). For example, in the case of a financial institution's annual loan/application register submission made pursuant to §1003.5(a)(1), if the financial institution provides a corrected disclosure to the borrower to reflect a refund made pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2)(v), the financial institution reports the corrected amount of total loan costs only if the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower prior to the end of the calendar year in which closing occurs.

Paragraph 4(a)(17)(ii)

1. Total points and fees—not applicable. Section 1003.4(a)(17)(ii) does not require financial institutions to report the total points and fees for transactions not subject to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.43(c), such as open-end lines of credit, reverse mortgages, or loans or lines of credit made primarily for business or commercial purposes, or for applications or purchased covered loans. In these cases, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(17)(ii) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable to the transaction.

2. Total points and fees cure mechanism. For covered loans subject to this reporting requirement, if a financial institution determines that the transaction's total points and fees exceeded the applicable limit and cures the overage pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.43(e)(3)(iii) and (iv), a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(17)(ii) by reporting the correct amount of total points and fees, provided that the cure was effected during the same reporting period in which closing occurred. For example, in the case of a financial institution's quarterly submission, the financial institution reports the revised amount of total points and fees only if it cured the overage prior to the end of the quarter in which closing occurred. The financial institution does not report the revised amount of total points and fees in its quarterly submission if it cured the overage after the end of the quarter, even if the cure was effected prior to the deadline for timely submission of the financial institution's quarterly data. However, the financial institution reports the revised amount of total points and fees on its annual loan/application register.

Paragraph 4(a)(18)

1. Origination charges—not applicable. Section 1003.4(a)(18) does not require financial institutions to report the total borrower-paid origination charges for applications, or for transactions not subject to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), such as open-end lines of credit, reverse mortgages, or loans or lines of credit made primarily for business or commercial purposes. In these cases, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(18) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable to the transaction.

2. Purchased loans—applications received prior to the integrated disclosure effective date. For purchased covered loans subject to this reporting requirement for which applications were received by the selling entity prior to the effective date of Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(18) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable to the transaction.

3. Corrected disclosures. If the total amount of borrower-paid origination charges changes because a financial institution provides a corrected version of the disclosures required under Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(18) by reporting the corrected amount, provided that the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower prior to the end of the reporting period in which closing occurs. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(18), the date the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower is the date disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.38(a)(3)(i). For example, in the case of a financial institution's annual loan/application register submission made pursuant to §1003.5(a)(1), if the financial institution provides a corrected disclosure to the borrower to reflect a refund made pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2)(v), the financial institution reports the corrected amount of borrower-paid origination charges only if the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower prior to the end of the calendar year in which closing occurs.

Paragraph 4(a)(19)

1. Discount points—not applicable. Section 1003.4(a)(19) does not require financial institutions to report the discount points for applications, or for transactions not subject to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), such as open-end lines of credit, reverse mortgages, or loans or lines of credit made primarily for business or commercial purposes. In these cases, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(19) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable to the transaction.

2. Purchased loans—applications received prior to the integrated disclosure effective date. For purchased covered loans subject to this reporting requirement for which applications were received by the selling entity prior to the effective date of Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(19) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable to the transaction.

3. Corrected disclosures. If the amount of discount points changes because a financial institution provides a corrected version of the disclosures required under Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(19) by reporting the corrected amount, provided that the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower prior to the end of the reporting period in which closing occurs. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(19), the date the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower is the date disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.38(a)(3)(i). For example, in the case of a financial institution's annual loan/application register submission made pursuant to §1003.5(a)(1), if the financial institution provides a corrected disclosure to the borrower to reflect a refund made pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2)(v), the financial institution reports the corrected amount of discount points only if the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower prior to the end of the calendar year in which closing occurs.

Paragraph 4(a)(20)

1. Lender credits—not applicable. Section 1003.4(a)(20) does not require financial institutions to report lender credits for applications, or for transactions not subject to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), such as open-end lines of credit, reverse mortgages, or loans or lines of credit made primarily for business or commercial purposes. In these cases, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(20) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable to the transaction.

2. Purchased loans—applications received prior to the integrated disclosure effective date. For purchased covered loans subject to this reporting requirement for which applications were received by the selling entity prior to the effective date of Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(20) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable to the transaction.

3. Corrected disclosures. If the amount of lender credits changes because a financial institution provides a corrected version of the disclosures required under Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f), pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(20) by reporting the corrected amount, provided that the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower prior to the end of the reporting period in which closing occurs. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(20), the date the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower is the date disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.38(a)(3)(i). For example, in the case of a financial institution's annual loan/application register submission made pursuant to §1003.5(a)(1), if the financial institution provides a corrected disclosure to the borrower to reflect a refund made pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(f)(2)(v), the financial institution reports the corrected amount of lender credits only if the corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower prior to the end of the calendar year in which closing occurs.

Paragraph 4(a)(21)

1. Interest rate—disclosures. Section 1003.4(a)(21) requires a financial institution to identify the interest rate applicable to the approved application, or to the covered loan at closing or account opening. For covered loans or applications subject to the integrated mortgage disclosure requirements of Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(e) and (f), a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(21) by reporting the interest rate disclosed on the applicable disclosure. For covered loans or approved applications for which disclosures were provided pursuant to both the early and the final disclosure requirements in Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(e) and (f), a financial institution reports the interest rate disclosed pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.19(f). A financial institution may rely on the definitions and commentary to the sections of Regulation Z relevant to the disclosure of the interest rate pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.19(e) or (f). If a financial institution provides a revised or corrected version of the disclosures required under Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.19(e) or (f), pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.19(e)(3)(iv) or (f)(2), as applicable, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(21) by reporting the interest rate on the revised or corrected disclosure, provided that the revised or corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower prior to the end of the reporting period in which final action is taken. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(21), the date the revised or corrected disclosure was provided to the borrower is the date disclosed pursuant to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.37(a)(4) or 1026.38(a)(3)(i), as applicable.

2. Applications. In the case of an application, §1003.4(a)(21) requires a financial institution to report the applicable interest rate only if the application has been approved by the financial institution but not accepted by the borrower. In such cases, a financial institution reports the interest rate applicable at the time that the application was approved by the financial institution. A financial institution may report the interest rate appearing on the disclosure provided pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.19(e) or (f) if such disclosure accurately reflects the interest rate at the time the application was approved. For applications that have been denied or withdrawn, or files closed for incompleteness, a financial institution reports that no interest rate was applicable to the application.

3. Adjustable rate—interest rate unknown. Except as provided in comment 4(a)(21)-1, for adjustable-rate covered loans or applications, if the interest rate is unknown at the time that the application was approved, or at closing or account opening, a financial institution reports the fully-indexed rate based on the index applicable to the covered loan or application. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(21), the fully-indexed rate is the index value and margin at the time that the application was approved, or, for covered loans, at closing or account opening.

Paragraph 4(a)(22)

1. Prepayment penalty term—not applicable. Section 1003.4(a)(22) does not require financial institutions to report the term of any prepayment penalty for transactions not subject to Regulation Z, 12 CFR part 1026, such as loans or lines of credit made primarily for business or commercial purposes, or for reverse mortgages or purchased covered loans. In these cases, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(22) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable to the transaction.

2. Transactions for which no prepayment penalty exists. For covered loans or applications that have no prepayment penalty, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(22) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable to the transaction. A financial institution may rely on the definitions and commentary to Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.32(b)(6)(i) or (ii) in determining whether the terms of a transaction contain a prepayment penalty.

Paragraph 4(a)(23)

1. General. For covered loans that are not purchased covered loans, §1003.4(a)(23) requires a financial institution to report the ratio of the applicant's or borrower's total monthly debt to total monthly income (debt-to-income ratio) relied on in making the credit decision. For example, if a financial institution calculated the applicant's or borrower's debt-to-income ratio twice—once according to the financial institution's own requirements and once according to the requirements of a secondary market investor—and the financial institution relied on the debt-to-income ratio calculated according to the secondary market investor's requirements in making the credit decision, §1003.4(a)(23) requires the financial institution to report the debt-to-income ratio calculated according to the requirements of the secondary market investor.

2. Transactions for which a debt-to-income ratio was one of multiple factors. A financial institution relies on the ratio of the applicant's or borrower's total monthly debt to total monthly income (debt-to-income ratio) in making the credit decision if the debt-to-income ratio was a factor in the credit decision even if it was not a dispositive factor. For example, if the debt-to-income ratio was one of multiple factors in a financial institution's credit decision, the financial institution has relied on the debt-to-income ratio and complies with §1003.4(a)(23) by reporting the debt-to-income ratio, even if the financial institution denied the application because one or more underwriting requirements other than the debt-to-income ratio were not satisfied.

3. Transactions for which no credit decision was made. If a file was closed for incompleteness, or if an application was withdrawn before a credit decision was made, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(23) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had calculated the ratio of the applicant's total monthly debt to total monthly income (debt-to-income ratio). For example, if a file was closed for incompleteness and was so reported in accordance with §1003.4(a)(8), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(23) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had calculated the applicant's debt-to-income ratio. Similarly, if an application was withdrawn by the applicant before a credit decision was made, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(23) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had calculated the applicant's debt-to-income ratio.

4. Transactions for which no debt-to-income ratio was relied on. Section 1003.4(a)(23) does not require a financial institution to calculate the ratio of an applicant's or borrower's total monthly debt to total monthly income (debt-to-income ratio), nor does it require a financial institution to rely on an applicant's or borrower's debt-to-income ratio in making a credit decision. If a financial institution made a credit decision without relying on the applicant's or borrower's debt-to-income ratio, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(23) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable since no debt-to-income ratio was relied on in connection with the credit decision.

5. Non-natural person. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(23) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable when the applicant and co-applicant, if applicable, are not natural persons.

6. Multifamily dwellings. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(23) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable for a covered loan secured by, or an application proposed to be secured by, a multifamily dwelling.

7. Purchased covered loans. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(23) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable when reporting a purchased covered loan.

Paragraph 4(a)(24)

1. General. Section 1003.4(a)(24) requires a financial institution to report, except for purchased covered loans, the ratio of the total amount of debt secured by the property to the value of the property (combined loan-to-value ratio) relied on in making the credit decision. For example, if a financial institution calculated a combined loan-to-value ratio twice—once according to the financial institution's own requirements and once according to the requirements of a secondary market investor—and the financial institution relied on the combined loan-to-value ratio calculated according to the secondary market investor's requirements in making the credit decision, §1003.4(a)(24) requires the financial institution to report the combined loan-to-value ratio calculated according to the requirements of the secondary market investor.

2. Transactions for which a combined loan-to-value ratio was one of multiple factors. A financial institution relies on the ratio of the total amount of debt secured by the property to the value of the property (combined loan-to-value ratio) in making the credit decision if the combined loan-to-value ratio was a factor in the credit decision, even if it was not a dispositive factor. For example, if the combined loan-to-value ratio is one of multiple factors in a financial institution's credit decision, the financial institution has relied on the combined loan-to-value ratio and complies with §1003.4(a)(24) by reporting the combined loan-to-value ratio, even if the financial institution denies the application because one or more underwriting requirements other than the combined loan-to-value ratio are not satisfied.

3. Transactions for which no credit decision was made. If a file was closed for incompleteness, or if an application was withdrawn before a credit decision was made, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(24) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had calculated the ratio of the total amount of debt secured by the property to the value of the property (combined loan-to-value ratio). For example, if a file is closed for incompleteness and is so reported in accordance with §1003.4(a)(8), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(24) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had calculated a combined loan-to-value ratio. Similarly, if an application was withdrawn by the applicant before a credit decision was made and is so reported in accordance with §1003.4(a)(8), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(24) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had calculated a combined loan-to-value ratio.

4. Transactions for which no combined loan-to-value ratio was relied on. Section 1003.4(a)(24) does not require a financial institution to calculate the ratio of the total amount of debt secured by the property to the value of the property (combined loan-to-value ratio), nor does it require a financial institution to rely on a combined loan-to-value ratio in making a credit decision. If a financial institution makes a credit decision without relying on a combined loan-to-value ratio, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(24) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable since no combined loan-to-value ratio was relied on in making the credit decision.

5. Purchased covered loan. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(24) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable when the covered loan is a purchased covered loan.

6. Property. A financial institution reports the combined loan-to-value ratio relied on in making the credit decision, regardless of which property or properties it used in the combined loan-to-value ratio calculation. The property used in the combined loan-to-value ratio calculation does not need to be the property identified in §1003.4(a)(9) and may include more than one property and non-real property. For example, if a financial institution originated a covered loan for the purchase of a multifamily dwelling, the loan was secured by the multifamily dwelling and by non-real property, such as securities, and the financial institution used the multifamily dwelling and the non-real property to calculate the combined loan-to-value ratio that it relied on in making the credit decision, §1003.4(a)(24) requires the financial institution to report the relied upon ratio. Section 1003.4(a)(24) does not require a financial institution to use a particular combined loan-to-value ratio calculation method but instead requires financial institutions to report the combined loan-to-value ratio relied on in making the credit decision.

Paragraph 4(a)(25)

1. Amortization and maturity. For a fully amortizing covered loan, the number of months after which the legal obligation matures is the number of months in the amortization schedule, ending with the final payment. Some covered loans do not fully amortize during the maturity term, such as covered loans with a balloon payment; such loans should still be reported using the maturity term rather than the amortization term, even in the case of covered loans that mature before fully amortizing but have reset options. For example, a 30-year fully amortizing covered loan would be reported with a term of “360,” while a five year balloon covered loan would be reported with a loan term of “60.”

2. Non-monthly repayment periods. If a covered loan or application includes a schedule with repayment periods measured in a unit of time other than months, the financial institution should report the covered loan or application term using an equivalent number of whole months without regard for any remainder.

3. Purchased loans. For a covered loan that was purchased, a financial institution reports the number of months after which the legal obligation matures as measured from the covered loan's origination.

4. Open-end line of credit. For an open-end line of credit with a definite term, a financial institution reports the number of months from origination until the account termination date, including both the draw and repayment period.

5. Loan or application without a definite term. For a covered loan or application without a definite term, such as a reverse mortgage, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(25) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable.

Paragraph 4(a)(26)

1. Types of introductory rates. Section 1003.4(a)(26) requires a financial institution to report the number of months, or proposed number of months in the case of an application, from closing or account opening until the first date the interest rate may change. For example, assume an open-end line of credit contains an introductory or “teaser” interest rate for two months after the date of account opening, after which the interest rate may adjust. In this example, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(26) by reporting the number of months as “2.” Section 1003.4(a)(26) requires a financial institution to report the number of months based on when the first interest rate adjustment may occur, even if an interest rate adjustment is not required to occur at that time and even if the rates that will apply, or the periods for which they will apply, are not known at closing or account opening. For example, if a closed-end mortgage loan with a 30-year term has an adjustable-rate product with an introductory interest rate for the first 60 months, after which the interest rate is permitted, but not required to vary, according to the terms of an index rate, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(26) by reporting the number of months as “60.” Similarly, if a closed-end mortgage loan with a 30-year term is a step-rate product with an introductory interest rate for the first 24 months, after which the interest rate will increase to a different known interest rate for the next 36 months, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(26) by reporting the number of months as “24.”

2. Preferred rates. Section 1003.4(a)(26) does not require reporting of introductory interest rate periods based on preferred rates unless the terms of the legal obligation provide that the preferred rate will expire at a certain defined date. Preferred rates include terms of the legal obligation that provide that the initial underlying rate is fixed but that it may increase or decrease upon the occurrence of some future event, such as an employee leaving the employ of the financial institution, the borrower closing an existing deposit account with the financial institution, or the borrower revoking an election to make automated payments. In these cases, because it is not known at the time of closing or account opening whether the future event will occur, and if so, when it will occur, §1003.4(a)(26) does not require reporting of an introductory interest rate period.

3. Loan or application with a fixed rate. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(26) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable for a covered loan with a fixed rate or an application for a covered loan with a fixed rate.

4. Purchased loan. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(26) by reporting that requirement is not applicable when the covered loan is a purchased covered loan with a fixed rate.

5. Non-monthly introductory periods. If a covered loan or application includes an introductory interest rate period measured in a unit of time other than months, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(26) by reporting the introductory interest rate period for the covered loan or application using an equivalent number of whole months without regard for any remainder. For example, assume an open-end line of credit contains an introductory interest rate for 50 days after the date of account opening, after which the interest rate may adjust. In this example, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(26) by reporting the number of months as “1.” The financial institution must report one month for any introductory interest rate period that totals less than one whole month.

Paragraph 4(a)(27)

1. General. Section 1003.4(a)(27) requires reporting of contractual features that would allow payments other than fully amortizing payments. Section 1003.4(a)(27) defines the contractual features by reference to Regulation Z, 12 CFR part 1026, but without regard to whether the covered loan is consumer credit, as defined in §1026.2(a)(12), is extended by a creditor, as defined in §1026.2(a)(17), or is extended to a consumer, as defined in §1026.2(a)(11), and without regard to whether the property is a dwelling as defined in §1026.2(a)(19). For example, assume that a financial institution originates a business-purpose transaction that is exempt from Regulation Z pursuant to 12 CFR 1026.3(a)(1), to finance the purchase of a multifamily dwelling, and that there is a balloon payment, as defined by Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.18(s)(5)(i), at the end of the loan term. The multifamily dwelling is a dwelling under §1003.2(f), but not under Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.2(a)(19). In this example, the financial institution should report the business-purpose transaction as having a balloon payment under §1003.4(a)(27)(i), assuming the other requirements of this part are met. Aside from these distinctions, financial institutions may rely on the definitions and related commentary provided in the appropriate sections of Regulation Z referenced in §1003.4(a)(27) of this part in determining whether the contractual feature should be reported.

Paragraph 4(a)(28).

1. General. A financial institution reports the property value relied on in making the credit decision. For example, if the institution relies on an appraisal or other valuation for the property in calculating the loan-to-value ratio, it reports that value; if the institution relies on the purchase price of the property in calculating the loan-to-value ratio, it reports that value.

2. Multiple property values. When a financial institution obtains two or more valuations of the property securing or proposed to secure the covered loan, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(28) by reporting the value relied on in making the credit decision. For example, when a financial institution obtains an appraisal, an automated valuation model report, and a broker price opinion with different values for the property, it reports the value relied on in making the credit decision. Section §1003.4(a)(28) does not require a financial institution to use a particular property valuation method, but instead requires a financial institution to report the valuation relied on in making the credit decision.

3. Transactions for which no credit decision was made. If a file was closed for incompleteness or the application was withdrawn before a credit decision was made, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(28) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had obtained a property value. For example, if a file is closed for incompleteness and is so reported in accordance with §1003.4(a)(8), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(28) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had obtained a property value. Similarly, if an application was withdrawn by the applicant before a credit decision was made and is so reported in accordance with §1003.4(a)(8), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(28) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, even if the financial institution had obtained a property value.

4. Transactions for which no property value was relied on. Section 1003.4(a)(28) does not require a financial institution to obtain a property valuation, nor does it require a financial institution to rely on a property value in making a credit decision. If a financial institution makes a credit decision without relying on a property value, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(28) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable since no property value was relied on in making the credit decision.

Paragraph 4(a)(29)

1. Classification under State law. A financial institution should report a covered loan that is or would have been secured only by a manufactured home but not the land on which it is sited as secured by a manufactured home and not land, even if the manufactured home is considered real property under applicable State law.

2. Manufactured home community. A manufactured home community that is a multifamily dwelling is not considered a manufactured home for purposes of §1003.4(a)(29).

3. Multiple properties. See comment 4(a)(9)-2 regarding transactions involving multiple properties with more than one property taken as security.

4. Scope of requirement. A financial institution reports that the requirement is not applicable for a covered loan where the dwelling related to the property identified in §1003.4(a)(9) is not a manufactured home.

Paragraph 4(a)(30)

1. Indirect land ownership. Indirect land ownership can occur when the applicant or borrower is or will be a member of a resident-owned community structured as a housing cooperative in which the occupants own an entity that holds the underlying land of the manufactured home community. In such communities, the applicant or borrower may still have a lease and pay rent for the lot on which his or her manufactured home is or will be located, but the property interest type for such an arrangement should be reported as indirect ownership if the applicant is or will be a member of the cooperative that owns the underlying land of the manufactured home community. If an applicant resides or will reside in such a community but is not a member, the property interest type should be reported as a paid leasehold.

2. Leasehold interest. A leasehold interest could be formalized in a lease with a defined term and specified rent payments, or could arise as a tenancy at will through permission of a land owner without any written, formal arrangement. For example, assume a borrower will locate the manufactured home in a manufactured home community, has a written lease for a lot in that park, and the lease specifies rent payments. In this example, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(30) by reporting a paid leasehold. However, if instead the borrower will locate the manufactured home on land owned by a family member without a written lease and with no agreement as to rent payments, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(30) by reporting an unpaid leasehold.

3. Multiple properties. See comment 4(a)(9)-2 regarding transactions involving multiple properties with more than one property taken as security.

4. Manufactured home community. A manufactured home community that is a multifamily dwelling is not considered a manufactured home for purposes of §1003.4(a)(30).

5. Direct ownership. An applicant or borrower has a direct ownership interest in the land on which the dwelling is or is to be located when it has a more than possessory real property ownership interest in the land such as fee simple ownership.

6. Scope of requirement. A financial institution reports that the requirement is not applicable for a covered loan where the dwelling related to the property identified in §1003.4(a)(9) is not a manufactured home.

Paragraph 4(a)(31)

1. Multiple properties. See comment 4(a)(9)-2 regarding transactions involving multiple properties with more than one property taken as security.

2. Manufactured home community. For an application or covered loan secured by a manufactured home community, the financial institution should include in the number of individual dwelling units the total number of manufactured home sites that secure the loan and are available for occupancy, regardless of whether the sites are currently occupied or have manufactured homes currently attached. A financial institution may include in the number of individual dwelling units other units such as recreational vehicle pads, manager apartments, rental apartments, site-built homes or other rentable space that are ancillary to the operation of the secured property if it considers such units under its underwriting guidelines or the guidelines of an investor, or if it tracks the number of such units for its own internal purposes. For a loan secured by a single manufactured home that is or will be located in a manufactured home community, the financial institution should report one individual dwelling unit.

3. Condominium and cooperative projects. For a covered loan secured by a condominium or cooperative property, the financial institution reports the total number of individual dwelling units securing the covered loan or proposed to secure the covered loan in the case of an application. For example:

i. Assume that a loan is secured by the entirety of a cooperative property. The financial institution would report the number of individual dwelling units in the cooperative property.

ii. Assume that a covered loan is secured by 30 individual dwelling units in a condominium property that contains 100 individual dwelling units and that the loan is not exempt from Regulation C under §1003.3(c)(3). The financial institution reports 30 individual dwelling units.

4. Best information available. A financial institution may rely on the best information readily available to the financial institution at the time final action is taken and on the financial institution's own procedures in reporting the information required by §1003.4(a)(31). Information readily available could include, for example, information provided by an applicant that the financial institution reasonably believes, information contained in a property valuation or inspection, or information obtained from public records.

Paragraph 4(a)(32)

1. Affordable housing income restrictions. For purposes of §1003.4(a)(32), affordable housing income-restricted units are individual dwelling units that have restrictions based on the income level of occupants pursuant to restrictive covenants encumbering the property. Such income levels are frequently expressed as a percentage of area median income by household size as established by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development or another agency responsible for implementing the applicable affordable housing program. Such restrictions are frequently part of compliance with programs that provide public funds, special tax treatment, or density bonuses to encourage development or preservation of affordable housing. Such restrictions are frequently evidenced by a use agreement, regulatory agreement, land use restriction agreement, housing assistance payments contract, or similar agreement. Rent control or rent stabilization laws, and the acceptance by the owner or manager of a multifamily dwelling of Housing Choice Vouchers (24 CFR part 982) or other similar forms of portable housing assistance that are tied to an occupant and not an individual dwelling unit, are not affordable housing income-restricted dwelling units for purposes of §1003.4(a)(32).

2. Federal affordable housing sources. Examples of Federal programs and funding sources that may result in individual dwelling units that are reportable under §1003.4(a)(32) include, but are not limited to:

i. Affordable housing programs pursuant to Section 8 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f);

ii. Public housing (42 U.S.C. 1437a(b)(6));

iii. The HOME Investment Partnerships program (24 CFR part 92);

iv. The Community Development Block Grant program (24 CFR part 570);

v. Multifamily tax subsidy project funding through tax-exempt bonds or tax credits (26 U.S.C. 42; 26 U.S.C. 142(d));

vi. Project-based vouchers (24 CFR part 983);

vii. Federal Home Loan Bank affordable housing program funding (12 CFR part 1291); and

viii. Rural Housing Service multifamily housing loans and grants (7 CFR part 3560).

3. State and local government affordable housing sources. Examples of State and local sources that may result in individual dwelling units that are reportable under §1003.4(a)(32) include, but are not limited to: State or local administration of Federal funds or programs; State or local funding programs for affordable housing or rental assistance, including programs operated by independent public authorities; inclusionary zoning laws; and tax abatement or tax increment financing contingent on affordable housing requirements.

4. Multiple properties. See comment 4(a)(9)-2 regarding transactions involving multiple properties with more than one property taken as security.

5. Best information available. A financial institution may rely on the best information readily available to the financial institution at the time final action is taken and on the financial institution's own procedures in reporting the information required by §1003.4(a)(32). Information readily available could include, for example, information provided by an applicant that the financial institution reasonably believes, information contained in a property valuation or inspection, or information obtained from public records.

6. Scope of requirement. A financial institution reports that the requirement is not applicable if the property securing the covered loan or, in the case of an application, proposed to secure the covered loan is not a multifamily dwelling.

Paragraph 4(a)(33)

1. Agents. If a financial institution is reporting actions taken by its agent consistent with comment 4(a)-4, the agent is not considered the financial institution for the purposes of §1003.4(a)(33). For example, assume that an applicant submitted an application to Financial Institution A, and Financial Institution A made the credit decision acting as Financial Institution B's agent under State law. A covered loan was originated and the obligation arising from a covered loan was initially payable to Financial Institution A. Financial Institution B purchased the loan. Financial Institution B reports the origination and not the purchase, and indicates that the application was not submitted directly to the financial institution and that the transaction was not initially payable to the financial institution.

Paragraph 4(a)(33)(i)

1. General. Section 4(a)(33)(i) requires a financial institution to indicate whether the applicant or borrower submitted the application directly to the financial institution that is reporting the covered loan or application. The following scenarios demonstrate whether an application was submitted directly to the financial institution that is reporting the covered loan or application.

i. The application was submitted directly to the financial institution if the mortgage loan originator identified pursuant to §1003.4(a)(34) was an employee of the reporting financial institution when the originator performed the origination activities for the covered loan or application that is being reported.

ii. The application was also submitted directly to the financial institution reporting the covered loan or application if the reporting financial institution directed the applicant to a third-party agent (e.g., a credit union service organization) that performed loan origination activities on behalf of the financial institution and did not assist the applicant with applying for covered loans with other institutions.

iii. If an applicant contacted and completed an application with a broker or correspondent that forwarded the application to a financial institution for approval, an application was not submitted to the financial institution.

Paragraph 4(a)(33)(ii)

1. General. Section 1003.4(a)(33)(ii) requires financial institutions to report whether the obligation arising from a covered loan was or, in the case of an application, would have been initially payable to the institution. An obligation is initially payable to the institution if the obligation is initially payable either on the face of the note or contract to the financial institution that is reporting the covered loan or application. For example, if a financial institution reported an origination of a covered loan that it approved prior to closing, that closed in the name of a third-party, such as a correspondent lender, and that the financial institution purchased after closing, the covered loan was not initially payable to the financial institution.

2. Applications. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(33)(ii) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable if the institution had not determined whether the covered loan would have been initially payable to the institution reporting the application when the application was withdrawn, denied, or closed for incompleteness.

Paragraph 4(a)(34)

1. NMLSR ID. Section 1003.4(a)(34) requires a financial institution to report the Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System and Registry unique identifier (NMLSR ID) for the mortgage loan originator, as defined in Regulation G, 12 CFR 1007.102, or Regulation H, 12 CFR 1008.23, as applicable. The NMLSR ID is a unique number or other identifier generally assigned to individuals registered or licensed through NMLSR to provide loan originating services. For more information, see the Secure and Fair Enforcement for Mortgage Licensing Act of 2008, title V of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (S.A.F.E. Act), 12 U.S.C. 5101 et seq., and its implementing regulations (12 CFR part 1007 and 12 CFR part 1008).

2. Mortgage loan originator without NMLSR ID. An NMLSR ID for the mortgage loan originator is not required by §1003.4(a)(34) to be reported by a financial institution if the mortgage loan originator is not required to obtain and has not been assigned an NMLSR ID. For example, certain individual mortgage loan originators may not be required to obtain an NMLSR ID for the particular transaction being reported by the financial institution, such as a commercial loan. However, some mortgage loan originators may have obtained an NMLSR ID even if they are not required to obtain one for that particular transaction. If a mortgage loan originator has been assigned an NMLSR ID, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(34) by reporting the mortgage loan originator's NMLSR ID regardless of whether the mortgage loan originator is required to obtain an NMLSR ID for the particular transaction being reported by the financial institution. In the event that the mortgage loan originator is not required to obtain and has not been assigned an NMLSR ID, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(34) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable.

3. Multiple mortgage loan originators. If more than one individual associated with a covered loan or application meets the definition of a mortgage loan originator, as defined in Regulation G, 12 CFR 1007.102, or Regulation H, 12 CFR 1008.23, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(34) by reporting the NMLSR ID of the individual mortgage loan originator with primary responsibility for the transaction as of the date of action taken pursuant to §1003.4(a)(8)(ii). A financial institution that establishes and follows a reasonable, written policy for determining which individual mortgage loan originator has primary responsibility for the reported transaction as of the date of action taken complies with §1003.4(a)(34).

4. Purchased loans. If a financial institution purchases a covered loan that satisfies the coverage criteria of Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.36(g), and that was originated prior to January 10, 2014, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(34) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable. In addition, if a financial institution purchases a covered loan that does not satisfy the coverage criteria of Regulation Z, 12 CFR 1026.36(g), and that was originated prior to January 1, 2018, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(34) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable. Purchasers of both such types of covered loans may report the NMLSR ID.

Paragraph 4(a)(35)

1. Automated underwriting system data—general. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting, except for purchased covered loans, the name of the automated underwriting system (AUS) used by the financial institution to evaluate the application and the result generated by that AUS. The following scenarios illustrate when a financial institution reports the name of the AUS used by the financial institution to evaluate the application and the result generated by that AUS.

i. A financial institution that uses an AUS, as defined in §1003.4(a)(35)(ii), to evaluate an application, must report the name of the AUS used by the financial institution to evaluate the application and the result generated by that system, regardless of whether the AUS was used in its underwriting process. For example, if a financial institution uses an AUS to evaluate an application prior to submitting the application through its underwriting process, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of the AUS it used to evaluate the application and the result generated by that system.

ii. A financial institution that uses an AUS, as defined in §1003.4(a)(35)(ii), to evaluate an application, must report the name of the AUS it used to evaluate the application and the result generated by that system, regardless of whether the financial institution intends to hold the covered loan in its portfolio or sell the covered loan. For example, if a financial institution uses an AUS developed by a securitizer to evaluate an application and intends to sell the covered loan to that securitizer but ultimately does not sell the covered loan and instead holds the covered loan in its portfolio, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of the securitizer's AUS that the institution used to evaluate the application and the result generated by that system. Similarly, if a financial institution uses an AUS developed by a securitizer to evaluate an application to determine whether to originate the covered loan but does not intend to sell the covered loan to that securitizer and instead holds the covered loan in its portfolio, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of the securitizer's AUS that the institution used to evaluate the application and the result generated by that system.

iii. A financial institution that uses an AUS, as defined in §1003.4(a)(35)(ii), that is developed by a securitizer to evaluate an application, must report the name of the AUS it used to evaluate the application and the result generated by that system, regardless of whether the securitizer intends to hold the covered loan it purchased from the financial institution in its portfolio or securitize the covered loan. For example, if a financial institution uses an AUS developed by a securitizer to evaluate an application and the financial institution sells the covered loan to that securitizer but the securitizer holds the covered loan it purchased in its portfolio, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of the securitizer's AUS that the institution used to evaluate the application and the result generated by that system.

iv. A financial institution, which is also a securitizer, that uses its own AUS, as defined in §1003.4(a)(35)(ii), to evaluate an application, must report the name of the AUS it used to evaluate the application and the result generated by that system, regardless of whether the financial institution intends to hold the covered loan it originates in its portfolio, purchase the covered loan, or securitize the covered loan. For example, if a financial institution, which is also a securitizer, has developed its own AUS and uses that AUS to evaluate an application that it intends to originate and hold in its portfolio and not purchase or securitize the covered loan, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of its AUS that it used to evaluate the application and the result generated by that system.

2. Definition of automated underwriting system. A financial institution must report the information required by §1003.4(a)(35)(i) if the financial institution uses an automated underwriting system (AUS), as defined in §1003.4(a)(35)(ii), to evaluate an application. To be covered by the definition in §1003.4(a)(35)(ii), a system must be an electronic tool that has been developed by a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or a Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit. A person is a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit, respectively, if it has securitized, provided Federal government insurance, or provided a Federal government guarantee for a closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit at any point in time. A person may be a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit, respectively, for purposes of §1003.4(a)(35) even if it is not actively securitizing, insuring, or guaranteeing closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit at the time a financial institution uses the AUS to evaluate an application. Where the person that developed the electronic tool has never been a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit, respectively, at the time a financial institution uses the tool to evaluate an application, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable because an AUS was not used to evaluate the application. If a financial institution has developed its own proprietary system that it uses to evaluate an application and the financial institution is also a securitizer, then the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of that system and the result generated by that system. On the other hand, if a financial institution has developed its own proprietary system that it uses to evaluate an application and the financial institution is not a securitizer, then the financial institution is not required by §1003.4(a)(35) to report the use of that system and the result generated by that system. In addition, for an AUS to be covered by the definition in §1003.4(a)(35)(ii), the system must provide a result regarding both the credit risk of the applicant and the eligibility of the covered loan to be originated, purchased, insured, or guaranteed by the securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor that developed the system being used to evaluate the application. For example, if a system is an electronic tool that provides a determination of the eligibility of the covered loan to be originated, purchased, insured, or guaranteed by the securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor that developed the system being used by a financial institution to evaluate the application, but the system does not also provide an assessment of the creditworthiness of the applicant—such as an evaluation of the applicant's income, debt, and credit history—then that system does not qualify as an AUS, as defined in §1003.4(a)(35)(ii). A financial institution that uses a system that is not an AUS, as defined in §1003.4(a)(35)(ii), to evaluate an application does not report the information required by §1003.4(a)(35)(i).

3. Reporting automated underwriting system data—multiple results. When a financial institution uses one or more automated underwriting systems (AUS) to evaluate the application and the system or systems generate two or more results, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting, except for purchased covered loans, the name of the AUS used by the financial institution to evaluate the application and the result generated by that AUS as determined by the following principles. To determine what AUS (or AUSs) and result (or results) to report under §1003.4(a)(35), a financial institution follows each of the principles that is applicable to the application in question, in the order in which they are set forth below.

i. If a financial institution obtains two or more AUS results and the AUS generating one of those results corresponds to the loan type reported pursuant to §1003.4(a)(2), the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting that AUS name and result. For example, if a financial institution evaluates an application using the Federal Housing Administration's (FHA) Technology Open to Approved Lenders (TOTAL) Scorecard and subsequently evaluates the application with an AUS used to determine eligibility for a non-FHA loan, but ultimately originates an FHA loan, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting TOTAL Scorecard and the result generated by that system. If a financial institution obtains two or more AUS results and more than one of those AUS results is generated by a system that corresponds to the loan type reported pursuant to §1003.4(a)(2), the financial institution identifies which AUS result should be reported by following the principle set forth below in comment 4(a)(35)-3.ii.

ii. If a financial institution obtains two or more AUS results and the AUS generating one of those results corresponds to the purchaser, insurer, or guarantor, if any, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting that AUS name and result. For example, if a financial institution evaluates an application with the AUS of Securitizer A and subsequently evaluates the application with the AUS of Securitizer B, but the financial institution ultimately originates a covered loan that it sells within the same calendar year to Securitizer A, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of Securitizer A's AUS and the result generated by that system. If a financial institution obtains two or more AUS results and more than one of those AUS results is generated by a system that corresponds to the purchaser, insurer, or guarantor, if any, the financial institution identifies which AUS result should be reported by following the principle set forth below in comment 4(a)(35)-3.iii.

iii. If a financial institution obtains two or more AUS results and none of the systems generating those results correspond to the purchaser, insurer, or guarantor, if any, or the financial institution is following this principle because more than one AUS result is generated by a system that corresponds to either the loan type or the purchaser, insurer, or guarantor, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the AUS result generated closest in time to the credit decision and the name of the AUS that generated that result. For example, if a financial institution evaluates an application with the AUS of Securitizer A, subsequently again evaluates the application with Securitizer A's AUS, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of Securitizer A's AUS and the second AUS result. Similarly, if a financial institution obtains a result from an AUS that requires the financial institution to underwrite the loan manually, but the financial institution subsequently processes the application through a different AUS that also generates a result, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of the second AUS that it used to evaluate the application and the AUS result generated by that system.

iv. If a financial institution obtains two or more AUS results at the same time and the principles in comment 4(a)(35)-3.i through .iii do not apply, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of all of the AUSs used by the financial institution to evaluate the application and the results generated by each of those systems. For example, if a financial institution simultaneously evaluates an application with the AUS of Securitizer A and the AUS of Securitizer B, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of both Securitizer A's AUS and Securitizer B's AUS and the results generated by each of those systems. In any event, however, the financial institution does not report more than five AUSs and five results. If more than five AUSs and five results meet the criteria in this principle, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by choosing any five among them to report.

4. Transactions for which an automated underwriting system was not used to evaluate the application. Section 1003.4(a)(35) does not require a financial institution to evaluate an application using an automated underwriting system (AUS), as defined in §1003.4(a)(35)(ii). For example, if a financial institution only manually underwrites an application and does not use an AUS to evaluate the application, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable since an AUS was not used to evaluate the application.

5. Purchased covered loan. A financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable when the covered loan is a purchased covered loan.

6. Non-natural person. When the applicant and co-applicant, if applicable, are not natural persons, a financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable.

7. Determination of securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor. Section 1003.4(a)(35)(ii) provides that an “automated underwriting system” means an electronic tool developed by a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit that provides a result regarding the credit risk of the applicant and whether the covered loan is eligible to be originated, purchased, insured, or guaranteed by that securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor. A person is a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit, respectively, if it has ever securitized, insured, or guaranteed a closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit. If a financial institution knows or reasonably believes that the system it is using to evaluate an application is an electronic tool that has been developed by a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit, then the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of that system and the result generated by that system. Knowledge or reasonable belief could, for example, be based on a sales agreement or other related documents, the financial institution's previous transactions or relationship with the developer of the electronic tool, or representations made by the developer of the electronic tool demonstrating that the developer of the electronic tool is a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit. If a financial institution does not know or reasonably believe that the system it is using to evaluate an application is an electronic tool that has been developed by a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit, the financial institution complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable, provided that the financial institution maintains procedures reasonably adapted to determine whether the electronic tool it is using to evaluate an application meets the definition in §1003.4(a)(35)(ii). Reasonably adapted procedures include attempting to determine with reasonable frequency, such as annually, whether the developer of the electronic tool is a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit. For example:

i. In the course of renewing an annual sales agreement the developer of the electronic tool represents to the financial institution that it has never been a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit. On this basis, the financial institution does not know or reasonably believe that the system it is using to evaluate an application is an electronic tool that has been developed by a securitizer, Federal government insurer, or Federal government guarantor of closed-end mortgage loans or open-end lines of credit and complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting that the requirement is not applicable.

ii. Based on their previous transactions a financial institution is aware that the developer of the electronic tool it is using to evaluate an application has securitized a closed-end mortgage loan or open-end line of credit in the past. On this basis, the financial institution knows or reasonably believes that the developer of the electronic tool is a securitizer and complies with §1003.4(a)(35) by reporting the name of that system and the result generated by that system.

Paragraph 4(a)(37)

1. Open-end line of credit. Section 1003.4(a)(37) requires a financial institution to identify whether the covered loan or the application is for an open-end line of credit. See comments 2(o)-1 and -2 for a discussion of open-end line of credit and extension of credit.

Paragraph 4(a)(38)

1. Primary purpose. Section 1003.4(a)(38) requires a financial institution to identify whether the covered loan is, or the application is for a covered loan that will be, made primarily for a business or commercial purpose. See comment 3(c)(10)-2 for a discussion of how to determine the primary purpose of the transaction and the standard applicable to financial institution's determination of the primary purpose of the transaction. See comments 3(c)(10)-3 and -4 for examples of excluded and reportable business- or commercial-purpose transactions.

4(f) Quarterly Recording of Data

1. General. Section 1003.4(f) requires a financial institution to record the data collected pursuant to §1003.4 on a loan/application register within 30 calendar days after the end of the calendar quarter in which final action is taken. Section 1003.4(f) does not require a financial institution to record data on a single loan/application register on a quarterly basis. Rather, for purposes of §1003.4(f), a financial institution may record data on a single loan/application register or separately for different branches or different loan types (such as home purchase or home improvement loans, or loans on multifamily dwellings).

2. Agency requirements. Certain State or Federal regulations may require a financial institution to record its data more frequently than is required under Regulation C.

3. Form of quarterly records. A financial institution may maintain the records required by §1003.4(f) in electronic or any other format, provided the institution can make the information available to its regulatory agency in a timely manner upon request.

Section 1003.5—Disclosure and Reporting

5(a) Reporting to Agency

1. [Reserved]

2. [Reserved]

3. [Reserved]

4. [Reserved]

5. Change in appropriate Federal agency. If the appropriate Federal agency for a covered institution changes (as a consequence of a merger or a change in the institution's charter, for example), the institution must report data to the new appropriate Federal agency beginning with the year of the change.

6. Subsidiaries. An institution is a subsidiary of a bank or savings association (for purposes of reporting HMDA data to the same agency as the parent) if the bank or savings association holds or controls an ownership interest that is greater than 50 percent of the institution.

7. Transmittal sheet—additional data submissions. If an additional data submission becomes necessary (for example, because the institution discovers that data were omitted from the initial submission, or because revisions are called for), that submission must be accompanied by a transmittal sheet.

8. Transmittal sheet—revisions or deletions. If a data submission involves revisions or deletions of previously submitted data, it must state the total of all line entries contained in that submission, including both those representing revisions or deletions of previously submitted entries, and those that are being resubmitted unchanged or are being submitted for the first time. Depository institutions must provide a list of the MSAs or Metropolitan Divisions in which they have home or branch offices.

5(b) Disclosure Statement

1. Business day. For purposes of §1003.5(b), a business day is any calendar day other than a Saturday, Sunday, or legal public holiday.

2. Format of notice. A financial institution may make the written notice required under §1003.5(b)(2) available in paper or electronic form.

3. Notice—suggested text. A financial institution may use any text that meets the requirements of §1003.5(b)(2). The following language is suggested but is not required:

Home Mortgage Disclosure Act Notice

The HMDA data about our residential mortgage lending are available online for review. The data show geographic distribution of loans and applications; ethnicity, race, sex, age, and income of applicants and borrowers; and information about loan approvals and denials. These data are available online at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's Web site (www.consumerfinance.gov/hmda). HMDA data for many other financial institutions are also available at this Web site.

4. Combined notice. A financial institution may use the same notice to satisfy the requirements of both §1003.5(b)(2) and §1003.5(c).

5(c) Modified loan/application Register

1. Format of notice. A financial institution may make the written notice required under §1003.5(c)(1) available in paper or electronic form.

2. Notice—suggested text. A financial institution may use any text that meets the requirements of §1003.5(c)(1). The following language is suggested but is not required:

Home Mortgage Disclosure Act Notice

The HMDA data about our residential mortgage lending are available online for review. The data show geographic distribution of loans and applications; ethnicity, race, sex, age, and income of applicants and borrowers; and information about loan approvals and denials. These data are available online at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's Web site (www.consumerfinance.gov/hmda). HMDA data for many other financial institutions are also available at this Web site.

3. Combined notice. A financial institution may use the same notice to satisfy the requirements of both §1003.5(c) and §1003.5(b)(2).

5(e) Posted Notice of Availability of Data

1. Posted notice—suggested text. A financial institution may post any text that meets the requirements of §1003.5(e). The Bureau or other appropriate Federal agency for a financial institution may provide a notice that the institution can post to inform the public of the availability of its HMDA data, or an institution may create its own notice. The following language is suggested but is not required:

Home Mortgage Disclosure Act Notice

The HMDA data about our residential mortgage lending are available online for review. The data show geographic distribution of loans and applications; ethnicity, race, sex, age, and income of applicants and borrowers; and information about loan approvals and denials. HMDA data for many other financial institutions are also available online. For more information, visit the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's Web site (www.consumerfinance.gov/hmda).

Section 1003.6—Enforcement

6(b) Bona Fide Errors

1. Bona fide error—information from third parties. An institution that obtains the property-location information for applications and loans from third parties (such as appraisers or vendors of “geocoding” services) is responsible for ensuring that the information reported on its HMDA/LAR is correct.

[80 FR 66317, Oct. 28, 2015, as amended at 82 FR 43136, Sept. 13, 2017; 82 FR 61146, Dec. 27, 2017]

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