';


Title 10 Part 1047

Title 10 → Chapter X → Part 1047

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations e-CFR

Title 10 Part 1047

e-CFR data is current as of August 13, 2018

Title 10Chapter X → Part 1047


Title 10: Energy


PART 1047—LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS


Contents

General Provisions

§1047.1   Purpose.
§1047.2   Scope.
§1047.3   Definitions.
§1047.4   Arrest authority.
§1047.5   Exercise of arrest authority—general guidelines.
§1047.6   Use of physical force when making an arrest.
§1047.7   Use of deadly force.

Authority: Sec. 2201, Pub. L. 83-703, 68 Stat. 919 (42 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.); Department of Energy Organization Act, Pub. L. 95-91, 91 Stat. 565 (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.).

Source: 50 FR 30929, July 31, 1985, unless otherwise noted.

return arrow Back to Top

General Provisions

§1047.1   Purpose.

The purpose of this part is to set forth Department of Energy (hereinafter “DOE”) policy and procedures on the exercise of arrest authority and use of force by protective force personnel.

return arrow Back to Top

§1047.2   Scope.

This part applies to DOE and DOE contractor protective force personnel armed pursuant to section 161.k. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.) to protect nuclear weapons, special nuclear material, clasified matter, nuclear facilities, and related property.

return arrow Back to Top

§1047.3   Definitions.

(a) Act means section 161.k. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, (42 U.S.C. 2201.k.).

(b) Arrest means any act, including taking, seizing or detaining of a person, that indicates an intention to take a person into custody and that subjects the person to the control of the person making the arrest.

(c) Citizen's Arrest means that type of arrest which can be made by citizens in general and which is defined in the statutory and case law of each state.

(d) Contractor means contractors and subcontractors at all tiers.

(e) LLEA means local law enforcement agencies: city, county; and state.

(f) Offender means the person to be arrested.

(g) Protective Force Officer means any person authorized by DOE to carry firearms under section 161.k. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

(h) Special Nuclear Material (SNM) means: (1) Plutonium, uranium enriched in the isotope 233 or in the isotope 235, and any other material which DOE, pursuant to the provisions of Section 51 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, determines to be special nuclear material, but does not include source material; or (2) any material artificially enriched by any of the foregoing, but does not include source material.

return arrow Back to Top

§1047.4   Arrest authority.

(a) Under the Act, the authority of a DOE protective force officer to arrest without warrant is limited to the performance of official duties and should be exercised only in the enforcement of:

(1) The following laws only if property of the United States which is in the custody of the DOE or its contractors is involved:

(i) Felonies: (A) Arson—18 U.S.C. 81—(only applicable to “special maritime and territorial jurisdiction of the United States” as defined by 18 U.S.C. 7).

(B) Building or property within special maritime and territorial jurisdiction—18 U.S.C. 1363—(only applicable to “special maritime and territorial jurisdiction of United States” as defined by 18 U.S.C. 7).

(C) Civil disorder—18 U.S.C. 231.

(D) Communication lines, stations or systems—18 U.S.C. 1362.

(E) Concealment, removal or mutilation generally—18 U.S.C. 2071.

(F) Conspiracy—18 U.S.C. 371—(violation of this section is a felony if the offense which is the object of the conspiracy is a felony).

(G) Destruction of motor vehicles or motor vehicle facilities—18 U.S.C. 33.

(H) Explosives—18 U.S.C. 844(f).

(I) Government property or contracts—18 U.S.C. 1361—(violation of section is a felony if property damage exceeds $100).

(J) Military, naval or official passes—18 U.S.C. 499—(pertains to forging or altering official passes).

(K) Personal property of the United States—18 U.S.C. 2112.

(L) Public money, property, or records—18 U.S.C. 641—(violation of section is a felony if the property value exceeds $100).

(M) Sabotage—18 U.S.C. 2151, 2153-2156.

(N) Violation under Physical Security Convention—18 U.S.C. 831.

(ii) Misdemeanors: (A) Conspiracy—18 U.S.C. 371—(violation of section is a misdemeanor if the offense which is the object of the conspiracy is a misdemeanor).

(B) Explosives—18 U.S.C. 844(g).

(C) Government property or contracts—18 U.S.C. 1361—(violation of section is a misdemeanor if the property damage does not exceed $100).

(D) Official badges, identification cards, other insignia—18 U.S.C. 701—(pertains to the manufacture, sale, and possession of official insignia).

(E) Public money, property or records—18 U.S.C. 641—(violation of section is a misdemeanor if the property value does not exceed $100).

(iii) Assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers or employees—18 U.S.C. 111. Both the felony and misdemeanor level offenses may only be enforced by protective force officers that are federal employees.

(2) The following criminal provisions of the Atomic Energy Act:

(i) Felonies: (A) Section 222. Violation of Specific Sections—42 U.S.C. 2272.

(B) Section 223. Violation of Sections Generally. 42 U.S.C. 2273.

(C) Section 224. Communication of Restricted Data—42 U.S.C. 2274.

(D) Section 225. Receipt of Restricted Data—42 U.S.C. 2275.

(E) Section 226. Tampering with Restricted Data—42 U.S.C. 2276.

(ii) Misdemeanors: (A) Section 227. Disclosure of Restricted Data—42 U.S.C. 2277.

(B) Section 229. Trespass Upon Commission (DOE) Installations—42 U.S.C. 2278.

(C) Section 230. Photographing, etc., of Commission (DOE) Installations—42 U.S.C. 2278.b.

(b) Felony Arrests. A protective force officer is authorized to make an arrest for any felony listed in paragraph (a)(1)(i) or (a)(2)(i) of this section if the offense is committed in the presence of the protective force officer or if he or she has reasonable grounds to believe that the individual to be arrested has committed or is committing the felony.

(c) Misdemeanor Arrest. A protective force officer is authorized to make an arrest for any misdemeanor listed in paragraph (a)(1)(ii) or (a)(2)(ii) of this section if the offense is committed in the presence of the protective force officer.

(d) Other Authority. The Act does not provide authority to arrest for violations of state criminal statutes or for violations of federal criminal statutes other than those listed in paragraph (a) of this section. Therefore, arrests for violations of such other criminal statutes shall be made by other peace officers (e.g., U.S. Marshals or Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agents for federal offenses; LLEA officers for state or local offenses) unless:

(1) The protective force officer can make a citizen's arrest for the criminal offense under the law of the state,

(2) The protective force officer is an authorized state peace officer or otherwise deputized by the particular state to make arrests for state criminal offenses, or

(3) The protective force officer has been deputized by the U.S. Marshals Service or other federal law enforcement agency to make arrests for the criminal offense.

(e) In those locations which are within the “special maritime and territorial jurisdiction of the United States,” as defined in 18 U.S.C. 7, the Assimilative Crimes Act (18 U.S.C. 13) adopts the law of the state for any crime under state law not specifically prohibited by Federal statute and provides for federal enforcement of that state law. The local DOE Office of Chief Counsel, in coordination with contractor legal counsel, as appropriate, shall provide guidance in this matter.

[50 FR 30929, July 31, 1985, as amended at 80 FR 23692, Apr. 29, 2015]

return arrow Back to Top

§1047.5   Exercise of arrest authority—general guidelines.

(a) In making an arrest, the protective force officer should announce his or her authority (e.g., “Security Officer”) and that the person is under arrest prior to taking the person into custody. If the circumstances are such that making such announcements would be useless or dangerous to the officer or others, the protective force officer may dispense with these announcements.

(b) The protective force officer at the time and place of arrest may search any arrested person for weapons and criminal evidence and the area into which the arrested person might reach for a weapon or to destroy evidence. Guidance on the proper conduct and limitations in scope of search and seizure of evidence shall be obtained from the local DOE Office of Chief Counsel, in coordination with contractor legal counsel, as appropriate.

(c) After the arrest is effected, the arrested person shall be advised of his or her constitutional right against self-incrimination (Miranda warnings). If the circumstances are such that making such advisement is dangerous to the officer or others, this requirement may be postponed until the immediate danger has passed.

(d) Custody of the person arrested should be transferred to other federal law enforcement personnel (i.e., U.S. Marshals or FBI agents) or to LLEA personnel, as appropriate, as soon as practicable. The arrested person should not be questioned or required to sign written statements unless:

(1) Questioning is necessary for security or safety reasons (e.g., questioning to locate a bomb), or

(2) Questioning is authorized by other federal law enforcement personnel or LLEA officers responsible for investigating the crime.

return arrow Back to Top

§1047.6   Use of physical force when making an arrest.

(a) When a protective force officer has the right to make an arrest as discussed above, the protective force officer may use only that physical force which is reasonable and necessary to apprehend and arrest the offender; to prevent the escape of the offender; or to defend himself or herself or a third person from what the protective force officer believes to be the use or threat of imminent use of physical force by the offender. It should be noted that verbal abuse alone by the offender cannot be the basis under any circumstances for use of physical force by a protective force officer.

(b) Protective force officers shall consult the local DOE Office of Chief Counsel and contractor legal counsel, as appropriate, for additional guidance on use of physical force in making arrests.

return arrow Back to Top

§1047.7   Use of deadly force.

(a) Deadly force means that force which a reasonable person would consider likely to cause death or serious bodily harm. Its use may be justified only under conditions of extreme necessity, when all lesser means have failed or cannot reasonably be employed. A protective force officer is authorized to use deadly force only when one or more of the following circumstances exists:

(1) Self-Defense. When deadly force reasonably appears to be necessary to protect a protective force officer who reasonably believes himself or herself to be in imminent danger of death or serious bodily harm.

(2) Serious offenses against persons. When deadly force reasonably appears to be necessary to prevent the commission of a serious offense against a person(s) in circumstances presenting an imminent danger of death or serious bodily harm (e.g. sabotage of an occupied facility by explosives).

(3) Nuclear weapons or nuclear explosive devices. When deadly force reasonably appears to be necessary to prevent the theft, sabotage, or unauthorized control of a nuclear weapon or nuclear explosive device.

(4) Special nuclear material. When deadly force reasonably appears to be necessary to prevent the theft, sabotage, or unauthorized control of special nuclear material from an area of a fixed site or from a shipment where Category II or greater quantities are known or reasonably believed to be present.

(5) Apprehension. When deadly force reasonably appears to be necessary to apprehend or prevent the escape of a person reasonably believed to: (i) have committed an offense of the nature specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4)1 of this section; or (ii) be escaping by use of a weapon or explosive or who otherwise indicates that he or she poses a significant threat of death or serious bodily harm to the protective force officer or others unless apprehended without delay.

1These offenses are considered by the Department of Energy to pose a significant threat of death or serious bodily harm.

(b) Additional Considerations Involving Firearms. If it becomes necessary to use a firearm, the following precautions shall be observed:

(1) A warning, e.g. an order to halt, shall be given, if feasible, before a shot is fired.

(2) Warning shots shall not be fired.

return arrow Back to Top